San  Jose Mercury News (San Jose, Calif.: daily circulation  230,870)

“Researchers  find use for recycled cigarette butts”

May 28,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

 

Some researchers have found a good  use for those billions of cigarette butts that line our streets and foul our  environment. They can be recycled into an anti-corrosive agent for steel,  according to a recent issue of the American Chemical Society's Industrial & Engineering Chemistry  Research. "Cigarette butts, one of the most ubiquitous forms of  garbage in the world, have been found to be toxic to saltwater and freshwater  fish," the researchers write. "Still, humans are inadvertently carpeting the  planet in cigarette butts. That is billions of cigarettes flicked, one at a  time, on our sidewalks, beaches, nature trails, gardens, and other public places  every single day." The article says one estimate is that 4.5 trillion cigarette  butts are cast off into the environment every year.

 

 

KGET-TV (Bakersfield, Calif.: 3.5 million monthly unique  users)

“INTERPOL,  U.S. EPA and 20 Countries Target Illegal E-Waste  Trade”

May 28,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Identifying and implementing a  worldwide strategy to combat the illegal traffic in electronic waste was the  focus of an INTERPOL Global E-Waste Crime Group meeting which concluded today.  The three-day meeting co-hosted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's  Office of Criminal Enforcement provided a forum for more than 100  representatives and experts from 21 countries and 12 nongovernmental  organizations, the largest ever such gathering of involved countries and  agencies. A study published in April by scientists at Arizona State University shows that developing countries  will be producing at least twice as much electronic waste as developed countries  within the next 20 years. Published in American Chemical Society's journal  Environmental Science &  Technology, the study projects that in 2030 developing countries will  be discarding 400 to 700 million obsolete personal computers per year compared  to 200 to 300 million in developed countries.

 

 

Treehugger (New York, N.Y.: 2.2 million monthly unique  users)

“New  Study Suggests Cancer-causing Chemicals in Drinking Water Comes from Shampoo,  Detergent”

May 28,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Ingredients commonly found in  shampoo, detergents and fabric softener may be the precursor of a suspected  cancer-causing chemical in treated wastewater. In a study published in Environmental Science & Technology,  researchers reported that harmful nitrosamines form from quaternary amines,  which are found in many consumer products, and since pretreatment with ozone or  chlorine does not reduce the amount of nitrosamines that form, many of these  nitrosamines end up in drinking water, wastewater and recreational water. One nitrosamine, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), is of particular  interest because it is a toxic organic chemical and a suspected human  carcinogen.

 

 

Medical  News Today (U.K.:  1.2 million monthly unique users)

“Better Animal-Free  Test For Chemicals That Can Cause Contact  Dermatitis”

May 28,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists are reporting development  of a fast, simple, inexpensive method for determining whether chemicals in  consumer products and workplaces may cause skin allergies in people -- a method  that does not involve use of animals. Their study appears in ACS' Chemical Research in Toxicology, a monthly  journal. Chemicals cause dermatitis by bonding to proteins in the skin, and then  aggravating the immune system so that redness, irritation, itching, and other  symptoms occur. Existing chemical tests use substances like glutathione that  mimic skin proteins and bond to allergy-causing ingredients. None, however, are  suitable for use in detecting the critical early stages of skin sensitization,  the scientists say. When used on 20 different chemicals known to cause skin  irritation, the test produced positive results. It produced negative results  when used to test substances that usually do not produce skin  sensitization.

 

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen,  Va.: 1.5  million monthly unique users)

“ACS  webinar focuses on how to improve technical writing  skills”

May 27,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

 

News media and others interested in  the chemical sciences are invited to join the next in a series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars™,  focusing on tips on how to improve your ability to write technically, the  "pain-free" way. Scheduled for Thursday, June 3, from 2 - 3 p.m. EDT, the free  ACS Webinar™ will feature Aline "Lindy" Harrison, the instructor for "Effective  Technical Writing Short Course" offered by the ACS Office of Professional  Education. She will speak on "Effective Technical Writing -- Tips and Strategies  Every Scientist Should Know."

 

 

AOL  News’ Kitchen Daily (New York, N.Y.: 6.2 million monthly unique  users)

“Three  Drinks to Lower Blood Pressure”

May 27,  2010

 

 

When you want to lower your blood  pressure, think beyond slashing salt, calories and fat -- and also consider what  you can add to your diet. More vegetables, fruits and lean protein, says the  Institute of  Medicine in a February 2010  report on preventing and controlling high blood pressure. Plus, recent research  points to three beverages that also may help to lower blood pressure. At your  next celebration, raise a glass of...cranberry juice? Turns out, cranberry juice  has the same blood pressure–lowering effects as red wine, according to a 2010  study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food  Chemistry.

 

 

MSN  Health & Fitness (New York, N.Y.: 1.7 million monthly unique  users)

“Is  Your Produce Losing Its Health Power?”

May 27,  2010

 

 

While we've been dutifully eating  our fruits and vegetables all these years, a strange thing has been happening to  our produce. It's losing its nutrients. That's right: Today's conventionally  grown produce isn't as healthful as it was 30 years ago—and it's only getting  worse. The decline in fruits and vegetables was first reported more than 10  years ago by English researcher Anne-Marie Mayer, Ph.D., who looked at the  dwindling mineral concentrations of 20 UK-based crops from the 1930s to the  1980s. A different story is playing out with organic produce. "By avoiding  synthetic fertilizers, organic farmers put more stress on plants, and when  plants experience stress, they protect themselves by producing phytochemicals,"  explains Alyson Mitchell, Ph.D., a professor of nutrition science at the  University of California, Davis. Her 10-year study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry showed that organic tomatoes can have as much as 30 percent more  phytochemicals than conventional ones.

 

 

New  Scientist (London, England: weekly circulation  170,000)

“DNA  replication... without life”

May 27,  2010

 

 

The precursor of life may have  learned how to copy itself thanks to simple convection at the bottom of the  ocean. Lab experiments reveal how DNA replication could have occurred in tiny  pores around undersea vents. One of the initial steps towards life was the first  molecule capable of copying itself. In the open ocean of early Earth, strands of  DNA and loose nucleotides would have been too diluted for replication to occur.  So how did they do it? Inside many undersea hydrothermal vents, magnesium-rich  rocks react with sea water. Such reactions create a heat source that could drive  miniature convection currents in nearby pores in the rock, claim Christof Mast  and Dieter Braun of Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany. Last year,  a team at Harvard  University found that fatty  acids driven by convection will form membranes. Such membranes could trap the  concentrated genetic material and transport it, he says in the Journal of the American Chemical  Society.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Green  Car Congress (34,400 monthly unique  users)

“Study Finds  That Air Traffic Could Become a Major Factor in Global  Warming”

May 27,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

A new study by a team at the Dalton  Research Institute in the UK projects that carbon dioxide and  other gases from air traffic will become a significant source of global warming  as they double or triple by 2050. The study was published in the in ACS journal  Environmental  Science &  Technology.

 

 

Discuss  Cancer

“Taking  Aim At Mysterious DNA Structures In The Battle Against  Cancer”

May 27,  2010

 

Designers of anti-cancer drugs are  aiming their arrows at mysterious chunks of the genetic material DNA that may  play a key role in preventing the growth and spread of cancer cells, according  to an article in a recent issue of Chemical  & Engineering News, ACS’ weekly  newsmagazine.

Thaindian.com (Bangkok, Thailand: 2.8 million monthly unique  users)

“Shampoos,  detergents ‘form harmful substance in  wastewater’”

May 27,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

 

Certain ingredients in shampoo,  detergents and other household cleaning agents may be a source of precursor  materials for formation of a suspected cancer-causing contaminant in water  supplies that receive water from sewage treatment plants, claim scientists. The  study, published in ACS’ Environmental  Science & Technology, sheds new light on possible environmental  sources of this poorly understood water contaminant, called NDMA. Their  laboratory research showed that when mixed with chloramine, some household  cleaning products - including shampoo, dishwashing detergent and laundry  detergent - formed NDMA. The report notes that sewage treatment plants may  remove some of quaternary amines that form NDMA. However, quaternary amines are  used in such large quantities that some still may persist and have a potentially  harmful effect in the effluents from sewage treatment  plants.

 

 

Indian  Express (New Delhi, India: 2 million monthly unique  users)

“Air  traffic set to become major factor in global  warming”

May 27,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

A study has found that airplanes,  which are a source of carbon dioxide emissions, are set to become a major factor  in global warming in the future. The first new projections of future aircraft  emissions in 10 years predicts that carbon dioxide and other gases from air  traffic will become a significant source of global warming as they double or  triple by 2050. Bethan Owen and colleagues note that aviation is not now one of  the main drivers of global warming, with international aviation (source of 60  percent of carbon dioxide emissions from aircraft) not even included in the  Kyoto Protocol. Global air traffic currently contributes to between 2 and 3  percent of carbon dioxide emissions — the main “greenhouse” gas linked to global  warming. The study has been published in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology, a  semi-monthly journal.

 

 

Medical  News Today (U.K.:  1.2 million monthly unique users)

“Potential Test For  Gum Disease Using Little-Known Mouth Fluid”

May 27,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

A little-known fluid produced in  tiny amounts in the gums, those tough pink tissues that hold the teeth in place,  has become a hot topic for scientists trying to develop an early, non-invasive  test for gum disease, the No. 1 cause of tooth loss in adults. It's not saliva,  a quart of which people produce each day, but gingival crevicular fluid (GCF),  produced at the rate of millionths of a quart per tooth. The study, the most  comprehensive analysis of GCF to date, appears in ACS' monthly Journal of Proteome Research. The  scientists collected GCF samples from 12 patients with a history of gum disease.  Using high-tech instruments, they identified 66 proteins, 43 of which they found  in the fluid for the first time. The fluid contained proteins from several  sources, including bacteria and the breakdown products of gum tissue and bone,  they note. They also identified antibacterial substances involved in fighting  infection.

 

 

R  & D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly  circulation 80,000)

“Giving  credit to the right Dr. Wong: Seeking a unique ID for  scientists”

May 26,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Which D. K. Wong gets credit for the  next miracle cure? Is it Daniel Keith Wong, Danny Karl Wong, or Danellia Kay  Wong? Scientists and publishers are trying to develop a new identity system -  similar to a social security number - that would eliminate the alphabet soup of  uncertainty that exists among authors of scientific papers with easily-confused  names. That's the topic of an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN),  ACS' weekly newsmagazine. One possible approach to such unique identifiers  involves setting up a central registry where every scientist could obtain an ID  upon publication of their first paper and use it throughout a lifetime of  publishing papers, applying for grants, and conducting other scientific  business.

 

 

The  Medical News (Sydney, Australia: 487,600 monthly unique  users)

“Scientists  develop inexpensive method for determining chemicals that may cause skin  allergies”

May 27,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists are reporting development  of a fast, simple, inexpensive method for determining whether chemicals in  consumer products and workplaces may cause skin allergies in people -- a method  that does not involve use of animals. Their study appears in ACS' Chemical Research in Toxicology, a monthly  journal. Itai Chipinda and his colleagues note the existence of public sentiment  against the use of animals to determine whether ingredients in consumer soaps,  shampoos and other consumer products, and workplace chemicals, may cause skin  sensitization and contact dermatitis. Instead of glutathione, Chipinda and his  team developed a test with nitrobenzenethiol as the skin protein surrogate. When  used on 20 different chemicals known to cause skin irritation, the test produced  positive results. It produced negative results when used to test substances that  usually do not produce skin sensitization.

 

 

United  Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.6 million monthly unique  users)

“Fuel  cell technology advance reported”

May 27,  2010

 

 

U.S. chemists  say a nanoparticle with a palladium core and an iron-platinum shell can  outperform commercially available pure-platinum fuel cell catalysts. The  scientists at Brown University and the Oak Ridge National  Laboratory said their finding could move fuel cells a step closer to reality.  The researchers said creating catalysts that can operate efficiently and last a  long time has been a big barrier in fuel-cell technology. Platinum has been the  choice for many researchers, but platinum has two major downsides: It's  expensive, and it breaks down over time in fuel-cell reactions. In the new  research led by Professor Shouheng Sun, the scientists said they created a  unique core and shell nanoparticle that uses far less platinum, yet performs  more efficiently and lasts longer than commercially available pure-platinum  catalysts at the cathode end of fuel-cell reactions. The research appears in The  Journal of the American Chemical  Society.

 

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen,  Va.: 1.5  million monthly unique users)

“Nanoporous Particles Deliver  Novel Molecular Therapies to Tumors”

May 26,  2010

 

 

Using nanoporous silicon particles,  two teams of investigators have created drug delivery vehicles capable of  ferrying labile molecular therapies deep into the body. Both groups believe  their new drug delivery vehicles create new opportunities for developing  innovative anticancer therapies. Mauro Ferrari, of the University of Texas  Health Sciences Center at Houston, led a research team aiming to develop  new methods of delivering therapeutic small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules to  tumors. He and his colleagues published their results of their studies in the  journal Cancer Research. Karl Erik Hellstrom, of the University of Washington, and Jun Liu and Chenghong Lei,  both of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), led the research group  developing methods for delivering therapeutic antibodies to tumors. Their  research was published in the Journal of the  American Chemical Society.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

QueenZine

“How  to improve your brain health”

May 27,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Consumption of blueberries helps to  keep the brain sharp. A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that blueberries rich in anthocyanins (antioxidant source of the bright  blue color in blueberries) encourage the communication of neurons in the brain.  This function delays memory loss.

 

 

Everyday  Science

“The sting of the scorpion could  save your life”

May 27,  2010

 

 

Researchers at the Universidad Rey  Juan Carlos have developed a new generation of primary materials in the  architecture of cardiac tissues and bone in humans, using molecules that mimic  the bite of a scorpion. These studies were published in several articles in  recent issues of the journals of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Inorganic Chemistry and Organometallics.

 

Merinews (Gurgaon, India: 1.6 million monthly unique users)

“Organic Insecticides from unroasted coffee beans-is it sustainable?”

May 26, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

 

A research study done by some Brazilian scientists have found out that unroasted coffee beans contain proteins that can kill insects, paving way to develop new insecticides for protecting food crops. Coffee is considered one of the most important tropical food crops and hence has varied uses. Leguminous crops like peas and beans contain proteins called globulins. An 11S legumin, a type of protein found in the coffee, represents 45%of the total protein content. They are sought to ward off insects, pests and other herbivores. Paulo Mazzafera and his team from Brazil experimented on two species of coffee- C. arabica and C. racemosa. Mazzafera wrote in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry date of publication saying, scientists in future can insert genes for these insect-killing proteins into important food crops, such as grains like wheat and maize which are more susceptible to insect attack, and can produce their own insecticides.

 

 

United Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.6 million monthly unique users)

“Silica particles may improve drug delivery”

May 25, 2010

 

 

U.S. scientists say they've found packaging anti-cancer drugs in chemically modified silica particles hikes the drugs' ability to fight skin cancer in mice. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington said they found the honeycombed particles can help anti-cancer antibodies prevent tumor growth and prolong the lives of mice. "We are very excited by our preliminary results," said biochemist Chenghong Lei, one of the researchers. "The silica's mesoporous nature provides honeycomb-like structures that can pack lots of individual drug molecules," said PNNL researcher Jun Liu. "We've been exploring the material for energy and environmental problems, but it seemed like a natural fit for drug delivery." The study appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

 

 

Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.5 million monthly unique users)

“Outstanding in Their Field Effect: Researchers Print Field-Effect Transistors With Nano-Infused Ink”

May 25, 2010

 

Rice University researchers have discovered thin films of nanotubes created with ink-jet printers offer a new way to make field-effect transistors (FET), the basic element in integrated circuits. While the technique doesn't exactly scale down to the levels required for modern microprocessors, Rice's Robert Vajtai hopes it will be useful to inventors who wish to print transistors on materials of any kind, especially on flexible substrates. In results reported in the online edition of ACS Nano, Rice scientists working with researchers in Finland, Spain and Mexico have created nanotube-based circuitry using high-end ink-jet printers and custom inks.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique users)

“Graphane yields new potential”

May 25, 2010

 

Graphane is the material of choice for physicists on the cutting edge of materials science, and Rice University researchers are right there with the pack – and perhaps a little ahead. Researchers mentored by Boris Yakobson, a Rice professor of mechanical engineering and materials science and of chemistry, have discovered the strategic extraction of hydrogen atoms from a two-dimensional sheet of graphane naturally opens up spaces of pure graphene that look – and act – like quantum dots. That opens up a new world of possibilities for an ever-shrinking class of nanoelectronics that depend on the highly controllable semiconducting properties of quantum dots, particularly in the realm of advanced optics. The theoretical work by Abhishek Singh and Evgeni Penev, both postdoctoral researchers in co-author Yakobson's group, was published online last week in the journal ACS Nano and will be on the cover of the print version in June. Graphane is simply graphene modified by hydrogen atoms added to both sides of the matrix, which makes it an insulator.

 

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.5 million monthly unique users)

“New study shows silver nanoparticles mitigate cell damage caused by ethanol”

May 26, 2010

 

The cover story of the most recent edition of the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS) describes how nanoparticles formed by very small numbers of silver atoms can protect against the cell damage caused by ethanol. The study was led by researchers from the University of Barcelona (Spain) and conducted in conjunction with the Magnetism and Nanotechnology laboratory of the University of Santiago de Compostela. "The results of the study show that these clusters of small numbers of silver atoms catalyze ethanol oxidation at similar concentrations to those found in the blood of alcoholics and at values of membrane potential and pH that are compatible with those exhibited by mammalian cells", explains Gustavo Egea, a professor with the Department of Cell Biology, Immunology and Neurosciences of the Faculty of Medicine at the UB and an affiliated researcher for the Institute of Nanosciences and Nanotechnology (IN2UB) and the August Pi i Sunyer Miomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS).

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

Business Articles

“Coffee Drinkers with Sensitive Stomachs Rejoice!”

May 25, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

 

In a recent study done by the American Chemical Society, food chemists examined dark roasted coffee to find that it naturally produces a chemical compound that prevents cells in the stomach from creating excess acid that is often exacerbated by drinking coffee. If you have ever struggled with having a sour stomach after drinking coffee in the morning, drinking a dark roast instead may be the solution that you have been looking for.

 

 

Article directory

“Different career options in the field of chemistry”

May 26, 2010

 

 

Are you looking forward to making your career in the field of chemistry? If yes, then all you need is a bachelor degree in chemistry. However, positions such as, environmental chemistry job and Analytical chemistry job needs higher qualification to perform research in their respective area… In a recent survey conducted by American Chemical Society the job opportunities for chemists is quite strong. The survey further reveals that median salary for environmental chemistry job escalated by nearly 9 percent while for other careers in chemistry it was nearly 6 per cent.

 

The Tennessean (Nashville, Tenn.: daily circulation 214,863)

“Program that invests in ingenuity needs approval”

May 23, 2010

 

The only sustainable source of U.S. economic development is American ingenuity. We have a unique gift for exploring opportunity, turning potential to innovation and creating prosperity. Think of Orville and Wilbur Wright, who designed the first aircraft on the plains near Dayton, Ohio, or Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak creating the first personal computers in California. These inventors didn’t simply create a product—they created world of growth and prosperity… The 2007 America COMPETES Act invests in science, technology, engineering and education—research and development to fuel the kind of brilliant ideas and start-up companies that will reinvigorate our economy. COMPETES must be reauthorized by Congress in 2010 or it will expire. The House of Representatives is poised to vote on the bill in May, and the Senate is working on its own version of the bill… Bruce E. Bursten is dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and distinguished professor of chemistry at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and past president of the American Chemical Society.

 

 

Chemistry World (London, England: “read by 65,000 scientists monthly”)

“US scientific body seeks national climate change strategy”

May 25, 2010

 

 

The US National Research Council (NRC) is urging its government to act immediately to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and develop a national strategy for adapting to the impacts of global warming. NRC, which is the operating arm of the US National Academies, made the plea on 19 May, when it released the first three of five reports requested by Congress more than two years ago to analyse the climate change situation. Bob Peoples, who heads the American Chemical Society's Green Chemistry Institute, agrees with  the NRC that harmonisation of the US approach to climate change is urgently needed. 'It is really critical that we have some kind of a national strategy and policy going forward, because industry needs stability and guidance in making the business decisions about technology development,' he says. Peoples notes that there are currently too many dispersed rules representing a patchwork of requirements and regulations that are difficult to satisfy. 'There is a huge infrastructure in place in energy, transportation, and chemical manufacturing - trillions of dollars in capital - and industry wants to know that green chemistry and engineering solutions will be viable.'

 

 

Chemie.de (Berlin, Germany: 385,000 monthly unique users)

“Biodiesel from sewage sludge within pennies a gallon of being competitive”

May 25, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

Existing technology can produce biodiesel fuel from municipal sewage sludge that is within a few cents a gallon of being competitive with conventional diesel refined from petroleum, according to an article in ACS' Energy & Fuels. Sludge is the solid material left behind from the treatment of sewage at wastewater treatment plants. David M. Kargbo points out in the article that demand for biodiesel has led to the search for cost-effective biodiesel feedstocks, or raw materials. The report, however, cautions that to realize these commercial opportunities, huge challenges still exist, including challenges from collecting the sludge, separation of the biodiesel from other materials, maintaining biodiesel quality, soap formation during production, and regulatory concerns. With the challenges addressed, "Biodiesel production from sludge could be very profitable in the long run," the report states. "Currently the estimated cost of production is $3.11 per gallon of biodiesel. To be competitive, this cost should be reduced to levels that are at or below [recent] petro diesel costs of $3.00 per gallon."

 

 

Forbes (New York, N.Y.: 4.3 million monthly unique users)

“PROVEN Partner Discusses How to Negotiate Salary on American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinar(TM)”

May 24, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

 

PROVEN Staffing Consultants' Senior Partner, Meredith Dow is the featured subject matter expert in the next in the series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars(TM). Scheduled for Thursday, May 27, 2 -- 3 p.m. EDT, the free ACS Webinar(TM) will feature Dow, who is the Senior Partner with PROVEN's Life Sciences practice, speaking on "Knowing Your Worth: Strategies to Negotiate for Salary or Pay for Chemical Professionals." Dow's topics will include: How to assess your worth in the current market and negotiable elements of a compensation package (salary, stock, vacation).

 

 

RedOrbit (Dallas, Tex.: 4.1 million monthly unique users)

“Cotton Candy Machine Inspires New Spin On Creating Tiny Nanofibers”

May 25, 2010

 

Hailed as a "cross between a high-speed centrifuge and a cotton candy machine," bioengineers at Harvard have developed a new, practical technology for fabricating tiny nanofibers. The reference by lead author Mohammad Reza Badrossamay to the fairground treat of spun sugar is deliberate, as the device literally—and just as easily—spins, stretches, and pushes out 100 nanometer-diameter polymer-based threads using a rotating drum and nozzle. The invention, reported in the May 24 online edition of Nano Letters, could be a boon for industry, with potential applications ranging from artificial organs and tissue regeneration to clothing and air filters. The researchers have filed a patent on their discovery. "This is a vastly superior method to making nanofibers as compared to typical methods, with production output many times greater," says co-author Kit Parker, Thomas D. Cabot Associate Professor of Applied Science and Associate Professor of Bioengineering in the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS); a core faculty member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard; and member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute.

 

 

United Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.6 million monthly unique users)

“Dioxins from triclosan are increasing”

May 24, 2010

 

 

U.S. researchers say they've found increasing dioxin levels from the antibacterial agent triclosan in Mississippi River sediments. University of Minnesota scientists said the levels of the four dioxins derived from triclosan -- used in many hand soaps, and other consumer products -- have risen as much as 300 percent during the last 30 years, while levels of all other dioxins have dropped by up to 90 percent. Triclosan was first added to commercial liquid hand soap in 1987, and by 2001 about 76 percent of commercial liquid hand soaps contained it, the researchers said. The study -- a collaboration with Pace Analytical Services Inc., the Science Museum of Minnesota and Virginia Tech -- appears in the May 18 online edition of the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

 

 

AsiaOne (Toa Payoh, Singapore: 1.2 million monthly unique users)

“Painless, cheaper way to diagnose bladder cancer”

May 25, 2010

 

Doctors here may have found a way of detecting bladder cancer through a simple urine sample, instead of the current method of having an invasive scope exam. If the team is successful, the test will not only be cheaper and far less painful, but it could also be more effective, as early studies have shown it to be 100 per cent sensitive. By comparison, a cystoscopy has only 33 per cent sensitivity, the study found. The researchers from the National University Health System and the National University of Singapore (NUS) received a $400,000 grant to start clinical trials for their method, which is called non-invasive urinary metabonomic diagnosis of bladder cancer. A study carried out between December 2008 and August last year on 24 patients who had the cancer and 51 who did not found the method to be 100 per cent accurate. Dr Chan added that the results also showed the potential of assessing which stage the cancer is at. The findings were published online by the Journal of Proteome Research, an American peer-reviewed scientific journal, in March this year.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

Science Codex (39,800 monthly unique users)

“Mercury levels are increasing in popular species of game fish in Lake Erie”

May 20, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Scientists are reporting that mercury levels in a popular species of game fish in Lake Erie are increasing after two decades of steady decline. The study, the most comprehensive to date on mercury levels in Great Lakes fish, is in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology, a semi-monthly journal.

 

 

Lab spaces (17,600 monthly unique users)

“Chemists report promising advance in fuel-cell technology”

May 25, 2010

 

 

Creating catalysts that can operate efficiently and last a long time is a big barrier to taking fuel-cell technology from the lab bench to the assembly line. The precious metal platinum has been the choice for many researchers, but platinum has two major downsides: It is expensive, and it breaks down over time in fuel-cell reactions. In a new study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, chemists at Brown University report a promising advance. They have created a unique core and shell nanoparticle that uses far less platinum yet performs more efficiently and lasts longer than commercially available pure-platinum catalysts at the cathode end of fuel-cell reactions.

 

Zimbio (San Carlos, Calif.: 21.7 million monthly unique users)

“Novel breath sensor detects Type-1 diabetes instantly”

May 22, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

Scientists have developed and successfully tested a sensor that can instantly tell whether someone has Type-I diabetes. It could also be used by emergency room doctors to determine whether a patient has developed diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially serious complication that occurs when diabetics do not take enough insulin. In the future, the technology may also be used by diabetics, in their own homes, to determine whether they need more insulin. Sotiris E. Pratsinis, professor and colleagues at ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology), explain that everyone has a little bit of acetone in their breath… Pratsinis' team found this new sensor can detect acetone in extremely moist air, an attribute that is critical for any breath test, said an American Chemical Society (ACS) release.

 

 

United Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.6 million monthly unique users)

“Mercury level rises in Lake Erie walleye”

May 21, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Mercury levels in Lake Erie walleye appear to be increasing after two decades of steady decline, Canadian scientists said. The researchers analyzed 5,807 fish samples collected from the Great Lakes between the 1970s and 2007. Mercury levels in the fish steadily declined from the mid-1970s to 2007 in the upper Great Lakes of Superior and Huron and leveled-off in Lake Ontario walleye between 1990 and 2007, said Satyendra Bhavsar, a researcher with the Ministry of the Environment in Ontario. In Lake Erie, however, walleye, a popular game fish, showed increased concentrations of mercury, Bhavsar and his team wrote in a recent issue of the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

 

 

Ars Technica (San Francisco, Calif.: 493,800 monthly unique users)

“Manure, sewage as biofuel materials”

May 24, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

If you look at any single source of biofuels, the numbers can seem depressing, as it's very difficult to obtain enough raw material to account for more than a small percentage of the United   States' liquid fuel use. The good news is that it's possible to feed a variety of raw materials into a limited number of outputs, such as bioethanol and biodiesel, meaning that a portfolio approach that combines multiple sources of biofuels may actually be able to put a dent in our fossil fuel consumption. A couple of recent articles have taken a look at one very promising source of raw materials: waste that we have a tough time disposing of in the first place. A recent issue of the American Chemical Society's Energy & Fuels looks at the potential for harvesting biofuels from municipal waste streams. As it turns out, raw municipal sewage has a substantial amount of lipids in it that lends itself to the production of biodiesel. Right now, biodiesel is largely produced from vegetable or seed oils, and the cost of agricultural products accounts for roughly 80 percent of the production costs. In contrast, municipal waste is something we currently pay to get rid of.

 

 

NSF’s Science360 News (Arlington, Va.: 163,400 monthly unique users)

“Proteins in unroasted coffee beans may become next-generation insecticides”

May 24, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Scientists in Brazil are reporting for the first time that coffee beans contain proteins that can kill insects and might be developed into new insecticides for protecting food crops against destructive pests. Their study, which suggests a new use for one of the most important tropical crops in the world, appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a bi-weekly publication. Their tests against cowpea weevil larva, insects used as models for studying the insecticidal activity of proteins, showed that tiny amounts of the coffee proteins quickly killed up to half of the insects. In the future, scientists could insert genes for these insect-killing proteins into important food crops, such as grains, so that plants produce their own insecticides, the researchers suggest. The proteins appear harmless to people.

 

 

Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.5 million monthly unique users)

“Silica Cages Help Anti-Cancer Antibodies Kill Tumors in Mice”

May 24, 2010

 

Packaging anti-cancer drugs into particles of chemically modified silica improve the drugs' ability to fight skin cancer in mice, according to new research. Results published May 3 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society online show the honeycombed particles can help anti-cancer antibodies prevent tumor growth and prolong the lives of mice. "We are very excited by our preliminary results," said biochemist Chenghong Lei of the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, part of the team of PNNL and University of Washington scientists. "We plan to do some additional, larger studies with animals. We hope the results hold up well enough to take it to clinical trials somewhere down the road."

 

 

Discovery News (Silver Spring, Md.: 2.2 million monthly unique users)

“Silver, Gold Makes for Cheap, Flexible Touch Screens”

May 24, 2010

 

 

Cheap, flexible touch screens made with silver and gold nanowires could soon be rolling off the presses and into cell phones, computers and more. The same technology could even be used in solar panels. Writing in the journal ACS Nano, scientists from Stanford  University say the new technology could be "immediately" used in consumer electronics. "It's a roll-to-roll process, just like printing newspapers," said Yu Cui, a scientist at Stanford  University and co-author of the paper. "It's extremely fast and can be done at a very low cost." Today, most touch screens and solar panels are glass-based. The hard, insulating glass helps protect and support the thin coating of electrically conductive metals. But glass is also brittle and heavy. When an object strikes a solar panel, or a person drops a cell phone, the glass can shatter. Touch screens made from thin plastic coated with silver and gold would be weigh less, take up less volume, would be more flexible and could be produced much faster than glass plates -- up to 100 times faster in fact.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique users)

“Excessive use of toxic materials in medical nanotechnology could be avoided”

May 24, 2010

 

 

Metal nanomaterials are often synthesized using the toxic reagent formaldehyde at concentrations thousands of times higher than necessary. Many of these same nanomaterials are being investigated for use in cancer treatment – however, there is a risk that they could do more harm than good. The large excess of formaldehyde that is used originates from methods developed 100 years ago… "The observation that previous synthetic routes for nanoshell and core-shell nanoparticles utilize a large excess of formaldehyde suggested an opportunity for minimizing the quantity of formaldehyde used," Scott Reed, an assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Colorado at Denver, tells Nanowerk. In a recent paper in the May 19, 2010 online edition of Chemistry of Materials, Reed's team and colleagues from Portland  State University describe an effort to minimize the amount of formaldehyde used for coating silver onto gold nanoparticles. They describe a strategy where formaldehyde use can be reduced 100-fold from prior routes and this minimization strategy can be applied to other nanoparticle syntheses.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

Skinshop

“Soybean Oil is new wonder ingredient for healthier sun creams”

May 24, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

 

A new method of converting soybean oil into an effective natural sunscreen could mean healthier sunscreens that are just as effective but much kinder and more beneficial to your skin than chemical sun creams. Scientists at the 239th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society suggested that the new bio-sunscreen could replace petroleum-based sunscreens which can caused irritation and dryness to sensitive skin as well as causing environmental damage through water contamination due to the non-organic chemicals in most sunscreens.

 

 

Green Car

“Can sewage be the replacement for petrol?”

May 21, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

According to Dr David Kargbo, who is with the US EPA’s Office of Innovation, Environmental Assessment and Innovation Division, biodiesel fuel can be produced from municipal sewage sludge and is within a few cents of a gallon of being as competitive as conventional diesel refined from petroleum. The analysis, published in Energy & Fuels, suggests that while conventionally pure vegetable or seed oils are used as raw materials for biodiesel they are expensive and constitute 70 and 85 per cent of the overall biodiesel production cost. Sludge however, would be a good source of raw materials for biodiesel.

 

Reuters (London, England: “viewed by more than 1 billion monthly”)

“A New Geological Epoch Is Upon Us: The Anthropocene”

May 20, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

The Holocene - or "wholly recent" epoch - is what geologists call the 11,000 years or so since the end of the last ice age. As epochs go, the Holocene is barely out of diapers; its immediate predecessor, the Pleistocene, lasted more than two million years, while many earlier epochs, like the Eocene, went on for more than 20 million years. Still, the Holocene may be done for. People have become such a driving force on the planet that many geologists argue a new epoch - informally dubbed the Anthropocene - has begun. In a recent paper titled "The New World of the Anthropocene," which appeared in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, a group of geologists listed more than a half dozen human-driven processes that are likely to leave a lasting mark on the planet - lasting here understood to mean likely to leave traces that will last tens of millions of years.

 

 

Times of India (New Delhi,  India: daily circulation 3.15 million)

“Proteins in coffee beans pave way for insecticides”

May 21, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

Scientists in Brazil have found that unroasted coffee beans contain proteins that can kill insects, a finding that may lead to new insecticides for protecting food crops. The study suggests a new use for one of the most important tropical crops in the world. Peas, beans and some other plant seeds contain proteins, called globulins, which ward off insects. Coffee beans contain large amounts of globulins, and Paulo Mazzafera and colleagues wondered whether those coffee proteins might also have an insecticidal effect. The high heat of roasting destroys globulins, so that they do not appear in brewed coffee. The study appears in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a bi-weekly publication.

 

 

Daily Caller (Washington D.C.: 594,100 monthly unique users)

“This tree’s a lady!”

May 20, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

Scientists have discovered the female sex hormone progesterone in a walnut tree, shaking up what’s known about the difference between plants and animals. Until now, scientists thought that only animals could make progesterone. A steroid hormone secreted by the ovaries, progesterone prepares the uterus for pregnancy and maintains pregnancy. A synthetic version, progestin, is used in birth control pills and other medications. “The significance of the unequivocal identification of progesterone cannot be overstated,” write ***** F. Pauli and colleagues in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Natural Products. “While the biological role of progesterone has been extensively studied in mammals, the reason for its presence in plants is less apparent.”

 

 

WHYY.org (Philadelphia, Pa.: 73,400 monthly unique users)

“From sludge to fuel”

May 20, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

An alternative energy expert at Temple  University says what we send down our drains could be processed and used to power farm equipment and heavy machinery. The budding biodiesel industry is mostly fueled by vegetable seeds such as soybeans and canola. But Philadelphia researcher David Kargbo says green experts are looking for alternatives to those petroleum alternatives. Kargbo: You know, energy is everywhere. And sometimes where we get the energy from can be very expensive, and also not good for the environment. Therefore we have to look for other means, and one of them is right in front of us, which is using sewage sludge. Sludge that smelly, soupy stuff that comes from sewage treatment plants is rich with energy-packed lipids and can be processed into biodiesel fuel. Kargbo is a scientist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (Energy & Fuels)

 

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.5 million monthly unique users)

“ACS webinar focuses on how to negotiate salary or pay for chemistry professionals”

May 20, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

 

News media and others interested in the chemical sciences are invited to join the next in a series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars™, focusing on strategies for negotiating pay or salaries for chemistry professionals. Scheduled for Thursday, May 27, 2 - 3 p.m. EDT, the free ACS Webinar™ will feature Meredith Dow, Senior Partner with PROVEN, a scientific staffing and consulting firm, speaking on "Knowing Your Worth: Strategies to Negotiate for Salary or Pay for Chemical Professionals." Dow's topics will include: How to assess your worth in the current market, negotiable elements of a compensation package (salary, stock, vacation), and how to negotiate the best possible compensation in a down market.

 

 

Financial Times (London, England: daily circulation 432,944)

“Oil hits Louisiana wetlands, confirming worst fears of locals”

May 21, 2010

 

 

Louisiana’s wetlands are quiet except for the sound of the occassional bird or spash of a fish or other animal along its marshy banks. The grasses are high, making it difficult to spot prey and, therefore, a good hiding place for the shrimp, crabs and other animals that grow up in the maze of waterways that run through it… The US Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday issued a directive requiring BP to identify and use a less toxic and more effective dispersant from the list of EPA authorized dispersants… Ruth Hathaway, a member of the American Chemical Society Division of Environmental Chemistry, said she believes it is worth it to use the dispersants to break up the oil and keep it from endangering potentially more wildlife. She likened it to how cancer patients use chemotherapy and radiation: “Most people would take the risk and go through it if they could have a longer life.”

 

 

Associated Content (Denver, Colo.: 23.8 million monthly unique users)

“Storing Vitamins Wrong Reduces Their Effectiveness”

May 20, 2010

 

 

More people than ever are taking vitamin and nutritional supplements of some type - and most store them in the kitchen or bathroom to make them more accessible when they need a glass of water to swallow them. On the other hand, according to a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, storing vitamins in the kitchen or bathroom may not be such a good idea. Exposing vitamins to these humid areas of the house can decrease their effectiveness. University  of Purdue researchers found that when vitamin pills are exposed to the high humidity in bathrooms and kitchens, it causes the outer layer of the vitamin to gradually dissolve - a phenomenon known as deliquescence. This process is accelerated at warmer temperatures, which makes the kitchen a particularly bad place to store vitamins since kitchens heat up when stoves and ovens are turned on. So effective is this breakdown process that storing vitamins in areas of high humidity can completely destroy their effectiveness.

 

 

Medical News Today (U.K.: 1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Arsenic In Playgrounds Nothing To Worry About: University Of Alberta Study”

May 21, 2010

 

 

Pressure treated wooden playground structures do not live up to the bad reputation they have earned as being harmful to children, according to the findings of a new University  of Alberta study. Chris Le, a scientist in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, can put to rest any safety concerns regarding playgrounds made of chromated copper arsenate-treated wood. This is good news to parents planning to begin the summer ritual of taking their children to the local playground. The study compared arsenic levels in urine and saliva samples of children playing in eight pressure treated wooden playgrounds and those in eight playgrounds made of other materials. The study found no significant difference in the concentration of arsenic species in children playing on playgrounds with or without the chemically-treated wood. Le's findings are published in the May 15 edition of Environmental Science & Technology.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

Oral Cancer News

“New biomarker technique could provide early detection for cancer”

May 19, 2010

 

Modern genetic testing can predict your risk of contracting particular diseases based on predispositions discovered in your DNA. But what if similar biotechnology could tell you that you’ve got a disease before you notice any symptoms? What if it could even tell you, before any signs of a tumor, that you have cancer? Jim Rusling, professor of chemistry at UConn and professor of cell biology at the UConn Health  Center, ponders these questions on a daily basis. In a recent publication in the journal Analytical Chemistry, Rusling and his colleagues describe a system they developed to detect with record sensitivity the bloodstream levels of a protein associated with several types of oral cancer, including head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

 

 

Science Stage

“Evidence of increasing antibiotic resistance”

May 20, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

A team of scientists in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands are reporting disturbing evidence that soil microbes have become progressively more resistant to antibiotics over the last 60 years. Surprisingly, this trend continues despite apparent more stringent rules on use of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture, and improved sewage treatment technology that broadly improves water quality in surrounding environments. Their report appears in ACS' bi-weekly journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Seattle Times (Seattle, Wash.: daily circulation  263,588)

“Researchers  use ubiquitous cigarette butts”

May 19,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

 

Some researchers have found a good  use for those billions of cigarette butts that line our streets and generally  foul our environment. They can be recycled into an anti-corrosive agent for  steel, according to the researchers in the American Chemical Society's March  issue of Industrial & Engineering  Chemistry Research. "Cigarette butts, one of the most ubiquitous  forms of garbage in the world, have been found to be toxic to saltwater and  freshwater fish," the researchers write. "Still, humans are inadvertently  carpeting the planet in cigarette butts. That is billions of cigarettes flicked,  one at a time, on our sidewalks, beaches, nature trails, gardens, and other  public places every single day." The article says one estimate is that 4.5  trillion cigarette butts are cast off into the environment every  year.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique  users)

“Nanotechnology breath  sensor detects diabetes and potentially serious  complication”

May 19,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists are reporting development  and successful testing of a sensor that can instantly tell whether someone has  Type I diabetes. It could also be used by emergency room doctors to determine  whether a patient has developed diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially serious  complication that happens when diabetics do not take enough insulin. Someday the  technology may also be used by diabetics, in their own homes, to determine  whether they need more insulin. A report on the sensor appears in ACS’ Analytical Chemistry. The device acts like  an electrical resistor. When it gets hit with a puff of acetone-filled air, its  resistance drops, allowing more electricity to pass between the electrodes. If a  diabetic were to breathe on the sensor, its resistance would suddenly drop. When  a healthy person exhales onto the nanoparticles, their resistance will not  change very much.

 

 

Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Ill.:  daily circulation 516,032)

“Toothpaste  chemical raises concerns”

May 20,  2010

 

 

Toothpaste containing triclosan, an  antibacterial agent, is better than regular fluoride toothpaste at reducing  plaque and gingivitis, according to a study published in the journal of General  Dentistry. But any benefit comes with a risk of chemical exposure, said Rolf  Halden, an associate professor at the Center for Environmental Biotechnology at  Arizona  State University, who was not involved with the  toothpaste study. In April, the Food and Drug Administration announced it would  study the safety of triclosan, which has been linked to disruptions of hormonal  function and may also play a role in the evolution of bacterial resistance to  antibiotics. In the Mississippi River, dioxins  derived from triclosan are increasing, according to new research published  online in the journal Environmental Science  and Technology. The University of Minnesota researchers found that over the  last 30 years, levels of the four dioxins derived from triclosan have risen by  200 to 300 percent in the river, while levels of all the other dioxins have  dropped by 73 to 90 percent.

 

 

United  Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.7 million monthly unique  users)

“Broccoli,  tomato benefits can be hiked”

May 19,  2010

 

 

U.S. scientists  say they've discovered specific agronomic practices can greatly increase the  cancer-preventive chemicals found in broccoli and tomatoes. "We enriched  pre-harvest broccoli with different bioactive components, then assessed the  levels of cancer-fighting enzymes in rats that ate powders made from these  crops," said University of Illinois  Professor Elizabeth Jeffery. She said the highest  levels of detoxifying enzymes were found in rats that ate selenium-treated  broccoli. The amount of one of the cancer-fighting compounds in broccoli was six  times higher in selenium-enriched broccoli than in standard broccoli powder, she  said. The study that included researchers Ann Liu and Sonja Volker appears in  the Journal of Agricultural and Food  Chemistry.

 

 

Diabetes  Health (Novato, Calif.: bi-monthly circulation  150,000)

“Glucose  Monitoring Medical Tattoo”

May 20,  2010

 

 

Tattoos aren't just an art form or a  way of making a personal statement anymore: They are beginning to save lives.  Scientists from the Draper Laboratory are developing a medical tattoo that would  do away with needle sticks to measure glucose levels. "We can follow the same  trends as a finger stick glucometer," said Heather Clark, a scientist at the  Draper Laboratory near Boston, in Discovery News. Her study, recently  published in the journal Analytical  Chemistry, describes the team's glucose monitoring tattoo, which  isn't a true tattoo. Clark's prototype medical  tattoo, however, would use a single stick from a hollow needle to stain the  first few layers of skin yellowish orange for about a week. The yellow-orange  dye contains tiny nanosensors, little balls about 100 nanometers across. Glucose  is drawn into the heart of the sensors, where it changes the color of a tiny  pigment molecule.

 

 

South  Bend Tribune (South Bend, Ill.: daily circulation  70,703)

“Notre  Dame researcher doing groundbreaking work on drug  design”

May 19,  2010

 

 

A new study by a team of researchers  led by Jeffrey Peng, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the  University of Notre Dame, is using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), to move  drug design into groundbreaking consideration of the dynamic flexibility of  drugs and their targets. The research, which was published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society,  contributes to the growing attention given toward the shape-shifting movement of  molecules, a feature that potentially could help drug designers overcome issues  of resistance, transportation of drugs to targets and oral bioavailability. “The  new focus is that it's not enough just to look at the protein motion,” Peng  said. “Of course, we've studied protein motions for some time, as many  disease-related proteins are flexible. But we've also realized that in order to  impact drug discovery, we also have to look at the candidate drug molecule that  is being designed, that is, the ‘ligand.' It can move  too.”

 

 

Medical  News Today (U.K.:  1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Diagnostic Use A  Step Closer With Low-Cost, Ultra-Fast DNA  Sequencing”

May 20,  2010

 

 

Sequencing DNA could get a lot  faster and cheaper - and thus closer to routine use in clinical diagnostics -  thanks to a new method developed by a research team based at Boston University. The team has demonstrated the  first use of solid state nanopores - tiny holes in silicon chips that detect DNA  molecules as they pass through the pore - to read the identity of the four  nucleotides that encode each DNA molecule. In addition, the researchers have  shown the viability of a novel, more efficient method to detect single DNA  molecules in nanopores. "We have employed, for the first time, an  optically-based method for DNA sequence readout combined with the nanopore  system," said Boston University biomedical engineer Amit Meller, who  collaborated with other researchers at Boston University, and at the University of Massachusetts  Medical School in Worcester. "This allows us to probe multiple  pores simultaneously using a single fast digital camera. Thus our method can be  scaled up vastly, allowing us to obtain unprecedented DNA sequencing  throughput." The research is detailed in Nano  Letters.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

The  Global Warming Statistics

“The  Anthropocene Debate: Marking Humanity’s Impact”

May 18,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Is human activity altering the  planet on a scale comparable to major geological events of the past? Scientists  are now considering whether to officially designate a new geological epoch to  reflect the changes that **** sapiens have wrought: the Anthropocene. In a  recent paper titled “The New World of the Anthropocene,” which appeared in the  journal Environmental Science and  Technology, a group of geologists listed more than a half dozen  human-driven processes that are likely to leave a lasting mark on the planet —  lasting here understood to mean likely to leave traces that will last tens of  millions of years. These include: habitat destruction and the introduction of  invasive species, which are causing widespread extinctions; ocean acidification,  which is changing the chemical makeup of the seas; and urbanization, which is  vastly increasing rates of sedimentation and  erosion.

 

 

Peak  Oil

“Researchers  Invent More Efficient Solar Cells”

May 20,  2010

 

By achieving a power conversion  efficiency of 9.5%, the new design boasts a superior performance compared with  its silicon counterparts, such as solar cells that incorporate nanowires,  nanotubes, and other optically active nanostructures. The best of these designs  has an efficiency of a little more than 5%. The researchers of the new study,  Kui-Qing Peng of Beijing Normal University, Shuit-Tong Lee of the City  University of Hong Kong, and their coworkers, have published their results in a  recent issue of the Journal of the American  Chemical Society.

john simpson

May 19, 2010

Posted by john simpson May 19, 2010

NSF’s  Science360 News Service (Arlington, Va.: 163,400 monthly unique  users)

“New Today on Science360 Radio: Global  Challenges/Chemistry Solutions”

May 19,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) Podcast

 

 

Although internationally publicized  oil spills like the Exxon Valdez incident publicly highlight the importance of  ecological protection and preservation, these disasters aren’t the only  environmental challenges due to oil contamination. Complex problems also occur  on a smaller-scale. For example, experts estimate that people dump more than 200  million gallons of used oil each year into sewers, streams, and backyards,  resulting in a problem that has plagued wastewater treatment plants for decades.  But an answer might be found in a material sometimes referred to as “frozen  smoke.” Super-lightweight solids, also known aerogels, could serve as the  ultimate sponge for capturing oil from wastewater and effectively soaking up  environmental oil spills. (Industrial &  Engineering Chemistry Research)

 

 

eHow.com (Bellevue, Wash.: 70.3 million monthly unique  users)

“What Are  the Benefits of Tropical Fruits?”

May 17,  2010

 

 

Tropical fruits not only taste good,  they provide nutritional benefits. Some of the most widely available tropical  fruits are coconuts, bananas, grapefruit, kiwis, limes, mangoes, pineapple,  guava and papaya. Adding these and other fruits to your diet will benefit your  health… Tropical fruits, like most fruits, are high in antioxidants.  Antioxidants help to neutralize the free radicals that form during the normal  process of oxidation that takes place continuously as your body metabolizes  oxygen. Free radicals can damage healthy cells and have been shown to promote  cancerous growths, asthma attacks, heart disease, and hardening and plaque  build-up in the arteries. Free radicals also contribute to joint pain and  arthritis inflammation. (Journal of  Agricultural and Food Chemistry)

 

 

Science  News (Washington D.C.: bi-weekly circulation  130,000)

“A  new source of dioxins: Clean hands”

May 18,  2010

 

 

Manufacturers have been adding the  germ fighter triclosan to soaps, hand washes, and a range of other products for  years. But here’s a dirty little secret: Once it washes down the drain, that  triclosan can spawn dioxins. Dioxins come in 75 different flavors, distinguished  by how many chlorine atoms dangle from each and where those atoms have attached  (their locations indicated by the numbers in the front part of a dioxin’s name).  The most toxic is 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, or TCDD. Some related kin  bearing four to eight chlorines are also toxic, just less so. The genesis of  these compounds isn’t just some laboratory curiosity. Triclosan's odd dioxins  also develop in the environment — big time, Arnold’s group reported May 18 online, ahead of  print, in Environmental Science &  Technology.

 

 

Softpedia (Bellevue, Wash.: 4.4 million monthly unique  users)

“Advanced  Microlens to Improve Infrared Imaging  Technology”

May 19,  2010

 

 

Taking a quantum dot-based infrared  detector as a starting point, a group of American researchers managed to produce  a new, advanced microlens that can boost the strength of an infrared signal. The  main accomplishment here is that this is done with a nanoscale device that does  not increase the noise (scrambled, unwanted data) of the signal as well. The  science group, based at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), basically  created a lens-less microlens, that harness the peculiar behavior that gold  exhibits at the nanoscale to create the amplification effect… The investigation  was funded mainly by the US Air Force (USAF) Office of Scientific Research. The  full details are published in a paper entitled “A Surface Plasmon Enhanced  Infrared Photodetector Based on InAs Quantum Dots,” which appears in the latest  online issue of the highly-regarded scientific journal Nano Letters.

 

 

Tampa Bay  Newspapers (Seminole, Fla.: weekly circulation  119,009)

“Lecher  named outstanding USF graduate”

May 18,  2010

 

 

Alanna Lecher, a 2006 graduate of  Seminole  High School, has earned the  Outstanding Graduate Award for the spring semester at the University of South  Florida-St. Petersburg. Lecher, who will be entering the doctorate program in  earth and planetary sciences this fall at the University of California-Santa  Cruz, won the award based on her work in and outside the classroom as a student,  researcher and volunteer. She also was active in research, using radiochemistry  to study the effect of effluent from the Mississippi River on the Gulf of Mexico dead zone. She also studied submarine  groundwater discharge along the continental shelf off the West Coast of Florida  and presented her findings at the American  Chemical Society Meeting.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique  users)

“Carbon  nanotube/biopolymer composites show promise as artificial  muscles”

May 19,  2010

 

 

The development of artificial  muscles is one of the key areas for bionic enhancements or replacements. The  quest to build artificial muscles using inherently conducting polymers can be  traced to Ray H. Baughman's paper "conducting polymer electromechanical  actuators" at the 1989 NATO Advanced Research Workshop "Conjugated polymeric  materials: opportunities in electronics, optoelectronics and molecular  electronics". "Recently, a new class of active system, carbon nanotube/polymer  composite actuators, has received great attention with regard to macroscopic  artificial muscle applications," Wei Chen tells Nanowerk. Reporting their  findings in the May 13, 2010 online edition of ACS Nano, the team demonstrated that the  energy conversion in the CNT/CS composite material results in a controllable  actuation and a new electromechanical property of the composite which doesn't  exist in either individual component.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Cigarettes  Digest

“Chinese scientists  claim cigarette butts can be useful”

May 19,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists from China stated they  have discovered a method to use millions of cigarette butts discarded by smokers  everywhere – on streets, parks, playgrounds and other places – the butts can be  used as corrosion protection for steel pipes. The results of the study can be  read in the Industrial & Engineering  Chemistry Research Journal published by the American Chemical  Society.

 

 

Research  Explainer

“Please  Explain: Training Scientists to Be  Better Communicators”

May 16,  2010

 

 

When it comes to persuading the  American public about some of the most controversial issues of our time, today’s  scientists too often get failing grades… Also, more scientific associations  should follow the lead of the American Association for the Advancement of  Science and the American Chemical  Society in establishing programs to encourage scientists’ public  involvement. The AAAS operates a Center for Public Engagement With Science &  Technology, and the ACS has established a Chemistry Ambassadors  program.

john simpson

May 18, 2010

Posted by john simpson May 18, 2010

 

Chemistry World (London, England: “read by more than 65,000 scientists monthly”)

“Congress pulls bill to increase science budgets”

May 17, 2010

 

 

A political fight between Democrats and Republicans in the US Congress has derailed legislation authorising funding for basic research and innovation. The bill in question reauthorises the America Competes Act, which expires on 30 September. It aims to keep the US National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on a 10-year budget-doubling trajectory to 2016. The reauthorisation legislation was pulled from consideration in the House of Representatives on 13 May after Republicans offered a last minute motion that cut funding for basic research programmes beyond a 10.3 per cent reduction from the levels in the original bill... The Democrats plan to bring the bill back for consideration in the House in the coming weeks, but it is unclear whether they will succeed. The American Chemical Society (ACS), which supports the bill, agrees that the price tag is a hard sell given the current budget situation. US debt has reached $13 trillion, and its budget deficit has increased 50 per cent in three years. ACS is primarily concerned that the bill retains bipartisan support - the original measure, passed in August 2007, enjoyed an overwhelming bipartisan vote. ACS also says it is a good barometer for how both political parties are willing to work together in the interest of national science and innovation. 

 

 

CNNgo.com (New York, N.Y.: 8 million monthly unique users)

“Smoking is good... for China's infrastructure”

May 17, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

 

The newest recyclable material in China? Cigarette butts. The Shanghai government might want to question the newly proposed smoking ban, as Chinese scientists announce that they’ve found a new use for the countless cigarette butts that litter local streets every day, leaching into the local environment: use them to protect steel piping, a key part of the Middle Kingdom's ever-increasing infrastructure. The recently released Chinese study, reported in the China Post, shows that remnants of used cigarettes butts, one of the world’s most common kinds of trash, “soaked in water can help guard against corrosion in a type of steel commonly used in the oil industry.” The study, published in “Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research,” explains the finding: “The scientists showed that extracts of cigarette butts in water, applied to a type of steel (N80) widely used in the oil industry, protected the steel from rusting even under the harsh conditions, preventing costly damage and interruptions in oil production. They identified nine chemicals in the extracts, including nicotine, which appear to be responsible for this anti-corrosion effect.”

 

 

United Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.7 million monthly unique users)

“Study: Handwashing prevents disease spread”

May 17, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

U.S. scientists report new evidence supporting the idea that handwashing can prevent the spread of water-borne disease. Researchers at Stanford University led by Associate Professor Alexandria Boehm and Assistant Professor Jenna Davis said their study showed a connection between fecal bacteria contamination on hands, fecal contamination of stored drinking water and health in households in a developing country in Africa. The scientists said their new study found a strong link between fecal contamination on the hands of household residents and bacterial contamination in stored water in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Stored water contained nearly 100 times more fecal bacteria than the source where it was collected. The study appears in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

 

 

MedGadget (El Granada, Calif.: 109,600 monthly unique users)

“New Polymers to Suppress Bacterial Virulence”

May 17, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Dr. Elena Piletska of Cranfield University and colleagues have come up with an innovative new technology to help control bacterial virulence and biofilm production - a method unlikely to induce resistance that could reduce nosocomial infections significantly. The group has developed a new polymer designed to attenuate quorum sensing by bacteria. This is based on the observation that bacteria are able to sense population density (quorum sensing) and use signaling molecules dependent on that information to regulate virulence and biofilm production. By creating a polymer that absorbs these signaling molecules, the expression of virulence genes could be reduced or prevented completely. The group suggests that the polymer could be applied to various surfaces, e.g. prostheses or catheters, and that specific polymers could be developed to target problematic bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. (Biomacromolecules)

 

 

WTAM.com (Cleveland, Ohio)

“Sniffing anesthetic may replace injection”

May 17, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

A sniff may replace an injection when getting a local anesthetic in the dentist's chair, U.S. researchers say. William H. Frey II, Leah Hanson and Neil Johnson at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minn., found anesthetic administered to the nose -- as nasal drops or spray -- travels through the nerve in the face and collects in the structures of the jaw, including the teeth. The study, published in the American Chemical Society's Molecular Pharmaceutics, suggests intra-nasal drug administration may change dentistry and be expanded for use with other conditions such as migraine.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

How to get Focused

“Focus and Food”

May 17, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

It’s 3pm in the afternoon. Your co-worker barges in for the zillionth time while your phone incessantly rings… Peppermint has also been touted as a aid to wake up the senses, and a recent study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found positive memory effects of blueberry juice on elderly subjects at risk of dementia versus the control group.

 

 

ScienceBlogs.com (1.5 million monthly unique users)

“Announcing the Winners of Science Idol...”

May 17, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

 

You voted and we listened: the winner of the USA Science & Engineering Jingle Contest is Ryan Miyakawa and his song "Come and Play at the USA Science & Engineering Festival". The runner-up was so close behind, that we created a 2nd prize for Daniel Rubalsky and his band, State the Name. Prof. Bokor encouraged Ryan to enter the contest with Ryan's music partner Glory Liu, a Berkeley student who had studied voice and sung competitively in high school. Since meeting as teaching assistants in a Physics of Music class four years ago, Ryan and Glory have teamed up as songwriting partners various times, including writing the catchy "Nano Song" - a song they penned for a video contest for the American Chemical Society. The song went viral on YouTube last year.

 

USA Today (McLean,  Va.: daily circulation 1.8 million)

“Study finds recycled cigarette butts make steel stronger”

May 15, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

Recycle cigarette butts? The estimated 4.5 trillion butts that are tossed each year into the environment can be recycled to make steel stronger, according to a new study. Chinese researchers found that nine chemicals in cigarette butts, including nicotine, protect a type of steel from rusting under even harsh conditions. Their cigarette-derived cocktail reduced corrosion between 90% and 94%. This steel (N80) is used widely in the oil industry, and its corrosion costs oil producers millions annually, say the scientists from Xi'an Jiaotong University. Their study appeared in a recent edition of the American Chemical Society's Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, a biweekly journal.

 

 

Huffington Post (New York, N.Y.: 28.7 million monthly unique users)

“Meatless Monday: The Meat People Hit Back”

May 17, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

 

In his paper "Clearing the Air," presented to the American Chemical Society, UC Davis air quality professor Frank Mitloehner says Sir Paul can't go selling meatlessness as a solution to global warming… The heart of his argument is the way greenhouse gas emissions were calculated "Livestock's Long Shadow," the seminal 2006 UN report which links animal production to global warming. The data went viral and the meat folks of the world seized on it as ammunition to dismiss our role in climate change. Mitloehner says the answer to global warming isn't less meat and milk, it's more. By way of factory farming. "The developed world should focus on increasing efficient meat production in developing countries, we should adopt more efficient Western-styled farming practices to make more food with less greenhouse gas production."

 

 

Kansas City Star (Kansas City,  Mo.: daily circulation 260,724)

“Greener exercise = better mood”

May 17, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

We all know the "aaaah" feeling that comes from being out in nature. I even get the same feeling from sitting on my front porch, looking at the birds and trees. But recently, a group of researchers quantified just how much "aaaah" benefit we get, as long as we're exercising at the same time. They found that just five minutes of walking in a pretty woodland setting, or gardening, or cycling around a lake - indeed, anything you do to get exercise while in a "natural" setting - could boost your mood and your mental health. Their study in the American Chemical Society's semi-monthly journal, Environmental Science & Technology, found that "green exercise" promotes personal well-being, and five minutes is all the dose you need.

 

 

AOL Health (New York, N.Y.: 977,000 monthly unique users)

“‘Sniff' Could Replace Novocaine Needle for Dental Surgeries”

May 14, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

A trip to the dentist may soon be a little less dreadful for the many people who fear the chair -- well mostly the drilling noises, funky-tasting toothpaste and, of course, the needles. Scientists have reported there is a new alternative in the form of a nasal spray that's in the works for administering local anesthesia to patients. The local anesthesia is given as nose drops or a spray then travels thought the main nerve in the face and gathers at the teeth, jaw and other areas of the mouth, Science Daily reported. Dr. Gerald Curatola, a practicing dentist and clinical asssociate professor at N.Y.U. College of Dentistry, told AOL Health that needle phobia is a very real and common fear that afflicts many patients, and not until recently have significant changes in local anesthesia been available. This breakthrough could be the first step toward intranasal drugs for noninvasive treatment for dental pain, migraine and other conditions, the researchers said in a statement. The scientists report will be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.

 

 

Associated Content (Denver, Colo.: 22.7 million monthly unique users)

“Expert Gives Opinion on How Gas Caused Deep Horizon Rig Explosion in Gulf of Mexico”

May 15, 2010

 

 

Many suggestions are no doubt being made on how to stop the oil leaking into the Gulf of Mexico and now even being found on beaches in Alabama. A natural gas bubble is thought to have triggered the Deep Horizon rig explosion that has resulted in deaths, injuries, and millions of gallons of oil leaking into the Gulf of Mexico. Michael Lynch, an energy and industrial expert, provides his analysis at Gerson Lehrman Group (GLG), a consulting firm that connects industries with experts in many fields. "According to one of the emails in circulation and I stress that these accounts cannot be verified and may be in error, a dispute arose between the BP Drilling Supervisor and one or more BP drilling engineers." The dispute concerned displacement of the heavy mud in the hole with sea water before beginning the cementation of the final plug. In the event, it was finally agreed to replace the heavy mud with sea water. This appears to have been the fatal mistake. The displacement reduced the hydrostatic head by about 3,000 pounds per square inch. This greatly reduced the safety factor… In 2005, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory recreated the high-pressure, low-temperature conditions of the seafloor in a tabletop apparatus for the study of methane-hydrates, an abundant but currently out-of-reach source of natural gas trapped within sediments below the ocean floor. The symposium on Gas Hydrates and Clathrates is being co-sponsored by the Petroleum and Fuel Divisions of the American Chemical Society.

 

 

Discover Magazine (New York, N.Y.: monthly circulation 700,000)

“Scientists Craft Tiny Transistor Powered by Your Own Cellular Fuel”

May 14, 2010

 

The structure of Aleksandr Noy’s new transistor is unimpressively simple: just a carbon nanotube connecting two metal electrodes. But what makes it special is what he and his team use to control it: adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the fuel from our own cells. The project, published in a study in Nano Letters, achieves a key step in unifying man and machine. The way it works: An insulator coats the ends of the nanotube, but not the middle—it’s left exposed. The entire device is then coated again, this time with a lipid bi-layer similar to those that form the membranes surrounding our body’s cells.” Finally, the team poured a solution of ATP plus potassium and sodium across the transistor. That created an electric current, one that was stronger the more ATP they poured.

 

 

Arkansas Democrat Gazette (Little Rock,  Ark.: daily circulation 182,212)

“Outdoors: Little Stinkers”

May 17, 2010

 

 

The great naturalist and writer Ernest Thompson Seton once maintained that the striped skunk was the proper emblem of America. “It is, first of all, peculiar to this continent,” he wrote. “It has stars on its head and stripes on its body. It is an ideal citizen; minds its own business, harms no one, and is habitually inoffensive, as long as it is left alone; but it will face any one or any number when aroused. It has a wonderful natural ability to take the offensive; and no man ever yet came to grips with a Skunk without being sadly sorry for it afterward.” Enter Paul Krebaum, a chemist at Molex Inc. in Lisle, Ill. This ingenious individual is credited with developing the first real home remedy for skunk spray. Krebaum’s formula, distributed nationally on the Internet, is winning over converts who thought the only viable antidote was the passage of time. When a cat owned by one of Krebaum’s colleagues got sprayed by a skunk, Krebaum recommended a variation of the formula he used for getting rid of thiols in the lab. The stuff worked like magic, and the next day, every trace of skunk odor was gone from the cat. The professional journal Chemical and Engineering News published Krebaum’s formula.

 

 

Medical News Today (U.K.: 1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Health Benefits Of Broccoli And Tomatoes Can Be Boosted By Growers”

May 17, 2010

 

A University of Illinois study has demonstrated that agronomic practices can greatly increase the cancer-preventive phytochemicals in broccoli and tomatoes. "We enriched preharvest broccoli with different bioactive components, then assessed the levels of cancer-fighting enzymes in rats that ate powders made from these crops," said Elizabeth Jeffery, a U of I professor of food science and human nutrition. The highest levels of detoxifying enzymes were found in rats that ate selenium-treated broccoli. The amount of one of the cancer-fighting compounds in broccoli was six times higher in selenium-enriched broccoli than in standard broccoli powder, she said. Selenium-treated broccoli was also most active in the liver, reaching a level of bioactivity that exceeded the other foods used in the experiment. The study was published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Liu and Sonja E. Volker co-authored the paper with Jeffery and Erdman.

 

 

Broadcast TV

 

 

WISN-MKE (ABC) (Milwaukee, Wisc.: daily viewers 45,177)

“Cigarette butts can be used to protect steel pipes”

May 17, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

Chinese scientists have found that chemical extracts from cigarette butts can be used to protect steel pipes from rusting. The oil industry spends millions to repair the corrosion of steel pipes. The study appears in the American Chemical Society’s journal.

 

 

WVLT (CBS) (Knoxville, Tenn.: daily viewers 12,359)

“A new use for cigarette butts”

May 17, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

Chinese scientists have found a new use for cigarette butts -- the chemical extracts can be used to protect steel pipes from rusting. In a paper published in the American Chemical Society's bi-weekly journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, the scientists in China said they identified nine chemicals after immersing cigarette butts in water. The chemicals, including nicotine, appear to be responsible for this anti-corrosion effect. China, which has 300 million smokers, is the world's largest smoking nation and it consumes a third of the world's cigarettes.

 

 

KGTV-SD (ABC) (San Diego, Calif.: daily viewers 32,283)

“Benzene build up inside parked cars?”

May 14, 2010

 

 

We’re looking at a warning being emailed around. It claims the toxic chemical benzene can build up inside parked cars and suggests you roll down your windows to ventilate the interior before turning on the air conditioning. This email is not supported by the research. The American Chemical Society studied the matter in 2007 and found there was no evidence the air inside parked cars posed a health hazard. This warning may have been sparked by a report out of Australia in 2001, which found high levels of toxic air emissions in new cars up to six months after they leave the showroom. But the research was only conducted on three cars made in Australia and one, unnamed, imported car.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

Green Agenda

“New plastic-like materials may say ’shhhh’ to hush disease-causing microbes”

May 17, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Scientists are reporting success in a first attempt to silence the biochemical conversations that disease-causing bacteria use to marshal their forces and cause infections. In a study in ACS’ journal, Biomacromolecules, they describe use of specially designed plastic-like materials to soak up the substances that bacteria produce and pass to one another as messages.

 

 

Nanotechnology Now

“Molecule-sized bait used by UCLA research team to fish for new drug targets”

May 15, 2010

 

 

UCLA researchers and their collaborators have developed a method that could open the door for investigations into the function of half of all proteins in the human body. In a paper published last month in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, an interdisciplinary team of researchers from UCLA and the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) report on their investigation of the interactions between large biomolecules, which include DNA and proteins, and small molecules, which include hormones and neurotransmitters such as serotonin.

The  Associated Press (New York, N.Y.: published by more than 1,700 newspapers  and more than 5,000 television and radio  broadcasters)

“China  scientists say cigarette butts protect steel”

May 14,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

 

[More than 650 media outlets,  including the Washington  Post (Washington D.C.: daily circulation 673,180), MSNBC (New York, N.Y.: 39.9 million monthly unique users), the Los  Angeles Times (Los Angeles, Calif.: daily circulation 723,181), BBC  World Service (London, England: 14 million monthly unique users), the New  York Post (New York, N.Y.: daily circulation 508,042), FOX  News (New York, N.Y.: 16.8 million monthly unique users), the Houston  Chronicle (Houston, Tex.: daily circulation 494,131), the Austin  American-Statesman (Austin, Tex.: daily circulation 151,520) and the Washington  Times (Washington D.C.: daily circulation 102,258), also carried the  story.]

 

 

Chinese scientists say they have  found a way for the countless cigarette butts that are tossed every day on  streets, beaches and other public places to be reused — in protecting steel  pipes from rusting. The remnants of used cigarettes, among the world's most  common form of trash, leak chemicals that have been shown to kill fish and  damage the environment. The problem could be alleviated if new uses are found  for the cigarette butts. "When people walk on the streets, they usually see  cigarette butts scattered everywhere, on the ground or the grass," said Jun  Zhao, a Ph.D. student at the Xi'an Jiaotong University, by telephone. "I felt it  was quite significant to do a project related to environmental protection." The  study is particularly relevant to China, where about 30 percent of the world's  smokers live, a number roughly equal to the entire U.S. population.  The country is home to both the world's largest tobacco grower and cigarette  producer. Zhao and other researchers in northwest China  said Friday they have found that cigarette butts soaked in water can help guard  against corrosion in a type of steel commonly used in the oil industry. The  finding was recently published in the American Chemical Society journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry  Research.

 

 

Times  of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.15  million)

“Local  anesthetic may replace dentist’s needle”

May 14,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

 

A new discovery may replace the  needle used to give local anesthetic in the dentist's chair for many procedures.  Boffins have reported that a common local anesthetic, when administered to the  nose as nose drops or a nasal spray, travels through the main nerve in the face  and collects in high concentrations in the teeth, jaw, and structures of the  mouth. The discovery could lead to a new generation of intranasal drugs for  noninvasive treatment for dental pain, migraine, and other conditions, the  scientists suggest in American Chemical Society's bi-monthly journal Molecular Pharmaceutics. The article is  scheduled for the journal's May-June issue.

 

 

Scientific  American (New York, N.Y.: monthly circulation  676,000)

“Fungi  Take A Bite Out Of BPA”

May 14,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Bisphenol A. Also called BPA, it’s  used to make shatter-proof plastic known as polycarbonate, found in everything  from water bottles to medical devices to the lining of food packaging. As much  as 2.7 million tons of plastics are manufactured each year with BPA. But – it’s  also an endocrine disruptor posing a threat to fetuses and young children. And  it’s been linked to cancer and metabolic disorders leading to obesity. So how  can plastics be properly disposed of to avoid releasing BPA into the  environment? Some fungus may help. So say researchers publishing in the journal  Biomacromolecules. The scientists  selected three fungi that are already used for environmental cleanup. They  wanted to optimize conditions for the fungi to break down polycarbonate, so  first they treated the plastic with ultraviolet light and heat. Untreated  polycarbonate served as a control.

 

 

Medical  News Today (U.K.:  1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Thwarting  Disease-Causing Microbes With The Help Of New Plastic-Like  Materials”

May 13,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists are reporting success in  a first attempt to silence the biochemical conversations that disease-causing  bacteria use to marshal their forces and cause infections. In a study in ACS'  monthly journal, Biomacromolecules, they describe use of  specially designed plastic-like materials to soak up the substances that  bacteria produce and pass to one another as messages. Elena Piletska and  colleagues point out that more and more disease-causing bacteria are developing  resistance to the effects of antibiotics. The scientists designed special  plastics, similar to those dentists use to repair damaged teeth, to capture  signaling molecules in laboratory experiments and thwart microbes' attempts to  start an infection. The plastics also reduced the ability of the bacteria to  form biofilms.

 

 

New  Scientist (London, England: weekly circulation  170,000)

“Nanotube  transistor will help us bond with machines”

May 12,  2010

 

 

A novel transistor controlled by the  chemical that provides the energy for our cells' metabolism could be a big step  towards making prosthetic devices that can be wired directly into the nervous  system. Transistors are the fundamental building blocks of electronic gadgets,  so finding ways to control them with biological signals could provide a route  towards integrating electronics with the body. Aleksandr Noy at the Lawrence  Livermore National Laboratory in California and colleagues chose to control  their transistor with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) – the molecular fuel found in  nearly all living cells. The new transistor is made up of a carbon nanotube,  which behaves as a semiconductor, bridging the gap between two metal electrodes  and coated with an insulating polymer layer that leaves the middle section of  the nanotube exposed. (Nano  Letters)

 

 

Science  Magazine (Washington D.C.: weekly circulation  125,000)

“Go  With The Flow: A Wave of Water-Related  Opportunities”

May 14,  2010

 

 

"Water supply is where climate  change hits the ground," declares a Natural Resources Defense Council policy  analyst. The imminent crisis of Earth's shrinking freshwater supply is rapidly  attaining the wide awareness of global climate change. Proliferating water  problems are building a wave of opportunities for scientific expertise,  knowledge, and innovative solution. Here's a look at the growing pool of diverse  needs… The American Chemical  Society's largest division, environmental chemistry, focuses mostly  on water, says Deborah Swackhamer of the University of Minnesota, recommending a visit to your  nearest chapter or regional meeting.

 

 

Broadcast  TV

 

 

WTHR-IN (NBC)  (Indianapolis, Ind.: daily audience  36,469)

“A  use for old cigarette butts”

May 14,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientist in China  say they have a use for old cigarette butts. In a paper published in the American Chemical Society's journal, the scientists say  chemicals inside the cigarette butts can actually protect steel used in oil  pipes from rusting. Corrosion of steel pipes costs oil producers millions of  dollars each year. According to the paper, 4.5 trillion cigarette butts find  their way into the environment each year.

 

 

KSEE-FRES (NBC)  (Fresno, Calif.: daily audience  23,022)

“Cigarette  butts to protect steel pipes?”

May 13,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

A study in China  finds cigarette butts can be used to protect steel pipes from rusting. This from  the American Chemical Society's bi-weekly journal. Scientists immersed the butts in water, then they applied the  extracts to a steel called "n-80". They found that they protected the steel from  rusting. China is the world's largest smoking  nation with 300 million smokers.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Steel

“Cigarette  butts used to prevent steel rusting in China”

May 14,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists in China  say they have found a potentially cheap way to protect steel from rust, by  extracting chemicals from discarded cigarette butts. In research published by a  journal of the American Chemical  Society, the scientists said cigarette filters produced nine  different chemicals when immersed in water.

 

 

University of Buffalo

“UB  Chemist to Receive Solid-State Award from American Chemical  Society”

May 13,  2010

 

 

A chemist at the University at  Buffalo has been  recognized by the American Chemical  Society for his research of a material that could be used for the  next generation of transistors. Sarbajit Banerjee, PhD, assistant professor of  chemistry, will be awarded the ExxonMobil Solid-State Chemistry Award at the  American Chemical Society Fall meeting in August. The award will be presented by  the ACS Division of Inorganic  Chemistry.

Reuters (New York, N.Y.: “viewed by more than 1 billion  monthly”)

“China scientists  find use for cigarette butts”

May 13,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

 

[More than 60 media outlets,  including the New  York Times (New York, N.Y.: daily circulation 928,000), Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 37.9 million monthly unique users), Zimbio (San Carlos, Calif.: 21.6 million monthly unique users), ABC News (New  York, N.Y.: 12.2 million monthly unique users) and Discovery  News (Silver Spring, Md.: 3.2 million monthly unique users), also carried  the story.]

 

 

Chemical extracts from cigarette  butts -- so toxic they kill fish -- can be  used to protect steel pipes from rusting, a study in China  has found. In a paper published in the American Chemical Society's bi-weekly  journal Industrial & Engineering  Chemistry Research, the scientists in China  said they identified nine chemicals after immersing cigarette butts in water.  They applied the extracts to N80, a type of steel used in oil pipes, and found  that they protected the steel from rusting. "The metal surface can be protected  and the iron atom's further dissolution can be prevented," they wrote. The  chemicals, including nicotine, appear to be responsible for this anti-corrosion  effect, they added.

 

 

Yahoo!  News (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 37.9 million monthly unique  users)

“National Lab Day  Teams With the White House for National Launch”

May 12,  2010

 

 

Today, National Lab Day (NLD) joined  with Obama Administration officials to participate in hands-on discovery  activities at schools throughout the Washington Metropolitan area. As a part of  National Lab Day's official launch, today's events highlight the wide range of  projects and matches between K-12 classes and experts achieved through the NLD  website – www.nationallabday.org.  "National Lab Day is a phenomenal program  which has already brought together more than 4000 volunteers to work with  educators and students across the country," said Secretary of Education Arne  Duncan. "Too often our students think of math and science as something to read  about but today's launch exposes them to new career fields and shows that  learning can be fun, hands-on and engaging." Partners and sponsors of National  Lab Day include the MacArthur Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation,  National Science Teachers Association, National Institutes of Health, American Chemical Society, National Science  Foundation.

 

 

AOL  News (Dulles, Va.:  6.3 million monthly unique users)

“Outdoor  Workouts: How a Little Green Time Could Save Your  Life”

May 4,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

 

Now that spring has sprung, it's  time to trade your regular gym sessions for some outdoor activity. Recent  studies suggest that even just a few minutes outdoors can have an amazing impact  on your body and soul. Five minutes of fresh air is all it takes to give your  self-esteem a lift, boost your mood and increase your lifespan, according to  researchers from the University of  Essex in England. The findings, to be  published in the upcoming edition of Environmental Science and Technology, were  compiled by analyzing the outdoor habits of over 1,200 people with differing  ages, genders and mental health issues, paying attention to activities like  walking, gardening, horseback riding and cycling. What they discovered was that  spending time outdoors led to improvements in both the physical and mental  health of the individual.

 

 

Yahoo!  Shine (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 5.3 million monthly unique  users)

“Smart  Ways to Stop Worrying”

May 12,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Got worries? Whether they’re small  (did I lock my keys in the car—again?!) or big (what if this lump is…cancer?),  if left unchecked, worries have a way of growing out of control. And when they  do, they can wreak havoc on our bodies—even leading to physical symptoms ranging  from dry mouth and rapid heartbeat to nausea and panic attacks. You may not be  able to prevent daily worries from cropping up, but you can change the way you  deal with them. Here are expert strategies for preventing, managing and stopping  worries dead in their tracks. Eat a mango. According to Japanese researchers,  the simple act of peeling, slicing and eating a mango, which contains a compound  called linalool, could help you chill out faster. In a study that appeared in a  recent issue of the Journal of Agricultural  and Food Chemistry, research found that simply inhaling the scent of  linalool-rich foods (others include basil and lemons) may help the body deal  with worry-related stress. Grab a square of chocolate. You love chocolate, but  could it actually help you worry less? Possibly, according to a study published  last year in the Journal of Proteome  Research. Scientists found that subjects who ate an ounce of dark  chocolate every day for two weeks experienced a reduction of stress hormones in  the body.

 

 

Times  of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.15  million)

“Schizophrenia  drugs turn up brain's key”

May 13,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Schizophrenia drugs raise the volume  of a key signalling system in the brain, a new research has found. Eric J.  Aamodt and colleagues say: "This is the first example of a common but specific  molecular effect produced by all antipsychotic drugs in any biological system."  Writing in the current edition of ACS  Chemical Neuroscience, a monthly journal, the team explains that  scientists know little about how antipsychotic drugs work, aside from the  drugs'' effects on one signalling chemical called dopamine. New studies, for  instance, suggested that medications like olanzapine, quetiapine, and clozapine  also affect other signalling systems in the brain.

 

 

Oneindia (Bangalore, India: 7.3 million monthly unique  users)

“New  guidelines may boost 'go green' practices”

May 13,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

A new movement is under way to  develop universal guidelines for determining whether chemical products and  chemical processes are environmentally friendly. The American Chemical Society's  Green Chemistry Institute (GCI) plans to create a "Greener Chemical Products and  Processes Standard", which will allow anyone to evaluate the relative  environmental performance of chemical products and their manufacturing  technologies. The next step could be an information label, similar to nutrition  information labels now used on foods, that manufacturers can apply to product  packaging to describe the product's eco-friendly attributes. For  business-to-business markets and for consumers, this should make choosing  "greener" products a lot easier. The article is published in Chemical and Engineering News, ACS' weekly  newsmagazine.

 

 

Thaindian  News (Bangkok, Thailand: 3 million monthly unique  users)

“Fungi  shows promise in decomposing toxic plastic”

May 13,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Pretreating polycarbonate plastic,  source of a huge ecological headache because of its bisphenol A (BPA) content,  with the help of fungi may be the key to disposing of the waste in an  eco-friendly way. Scientists pretreated polycarbonate with ultraviolet light and  heat and exposed it to three kinds of fungi, including the fabled white-rot  fungus used commercially for environmental remediation of the toughest  pollutants. The scientists found that fungi grew better on pretreated plastic,  using its BPA and other ingredients as a source of energy and breaking down the  plastic, an American Chemical  Society (ACS) release said. After 12 months, there was almost no  decomposition of the untreated plastic, compared to substantial decomposition of  the pretreated plastic, with no release of BPA.

 

 

Broadcast  TV

 

 

C-SPAN (Washington D.C.)

“American  Chemical Society on C-SPAN”

May 12,  2010

 

 

Last are the sponsors of this  important legislation. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Business Roundtable,  the National Association of Manufacturers, the Council of Competitiveness, the  Task Force of American Ovation, the American Chemical Society as well as a growing list of  over 1,000 major companies, universities, trade associations and professional  organizations. All understanding the benefits to U.S.  companies of making a sustained commitment to research and STEM education.  COMPETES is and will continue to be a bipartisan, bicameral effort that every  member of this house can feel ownership of and should take bragging rights  on.

 

 

C-SPAN (Washington D.C.)

“ACS,  green chemistry on C-SPAN”

May 12,  2010

 

 

I want to thank my colleague from  the Energy and Commerce Committee, Mr. Welch, for his support and leadership on  the issue. And I'd also like to thank the American Chemical Society for its endorsement of this  amendment. Actually, and certainly not least, I'd like to commend both science  committee chairman Bart Gordon and Ranking Member Hall on their leadership on  green chemistry and their willingness to work with us on this particular  amendment.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Biology  and Medicine

“New plastic-like materials may  say ’shhhh’ to hush disease-causing  microbes”

May 12,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists are reporting success in  a first attempt to silence the biochemical conversations that disease-causing  bacteria use to marshal their forces and cause infections. In a study in ACS'  monthly journal, Biomacromolecules, they describe use of  specially designed plastic-like materials to soak up the substances that  bacteria produce and pass to one another as  messages.

 

 

Go  Green

“ACS Green Chemistry Institute  To Host Green Chemistry Conference”

May 12,  2010

 

 

The American Chemical Society's (ACS) Green Chemistry  Institute will host the 14th Annual Green Chemistry and Engineering  Conference from June 21-23 in Washington, D.C.

Psychology  Today (New York, N.Y.: bi-monthly circulation  300,000)

“Ecopsychology:  An Idea Whose Times Has Come”

May 11,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) press release

 

 

In his 1982 book "Nature and  Madness," Professor of Human Ecology at Pitzer College in Claremont, California, the late Paul Shepard, argues that  there are profound and innate connections between the human mind and the natural  world. His thinking starts with the idea that evolution shaped the brain to  shrink complexity by categorization… But even stronger proof comes out of new  meta-analysis published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.  These authors were looking at the impact contact with the natural world had on  self-esteem (a fairly broad but good measure of our mind's innate connectivity  to the natural world). Their results were downright startling. The study  analyzed 1200 people involved in 10 separate studies done in the UK and  found that a five-minute "dose" of nature was enough to improve self-esteem. The  study also showed that this effect held across a variety of outdoor  activities-from hiking through fishing through gardening (and even  farming).

 

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen,  Va.: 1.5  million monthly unique users)

“ACS  Green Chemistry Institute to host green chemistry conference in Washington,  D.C., June 21-23”

May 11,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

 

The American Chemical Society's (ACS) Green Chemistry  Institute will host the 14th Annual Green Chemistry and Engineering  Conference from June 21-23 in Washington, D.C. The annual conference, which regularly  attracts scientific leaders from around the world, will be held at the Capital  Hilton Hotel, just two blocks north of the White House. With an overarching  theme of "Innovation and Application," this year's conference will celebrate  recent innovations and applications at the cutting edge of green chemistry. The  conference also will address environmental challenges and explore sustainable  solutions of today for future generations, which will heighten the efforts of  D.C. city officials. The program includes more than 15 technical sessions,  including bio-fuels, education, energy, entrepreneurship, environmental health  sciences, pharmaceuticals, and sustainable design. "Whether interested in a wide  variety of topics or focused on a specific area of green chemistry and  engineering, we are confident you will find plenty to capture your imagination  and curiosity," said John Warner, this year's Conference Chair and President and  CTO of the Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry, in Wilmington, Mass.

 

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen,  Va.: 1.5  million monthly unique users)

“Save  the date: American Chemical Society National Meeting in Boston, Aug.  22-26”

May 11,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

 

What better venue than Boston — with its famed  medical institutions — for a major scientific conference with the theme  "Chemistry for Preventing & Combating Disease"? This historic Northeast city  will, in fact, be the setting for such an event ― the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 240th National  Meeting & Exposition, Aug. 22-26. In addition to focusing on  health, the gathering will offer print, broadcast, and online journalists a rich  assortment of spot news and feature possibilities with nearly 8,000  presentations on new discoveries that span science's horizons — from astronomy  to zoology. The topics include food and nutrition, medicine, health, energy, the  environment, and other fields where chemistry plays a central role.  Presentations will take place at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center and at downtown  hotels.

 

 

MSNBC (New York, N.Y.: 39.9 million monthly unique  users)

“‘Sports  Science & Medicine’ Topic of Next Science  Café”

May 11,  2010

 

 

The Science Caf Little Rock,  co-sponsored by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), will  hold its next public forum, Sports Science Medicine on May 25th. Panelists will  discuss the physics involved in various sports, as well as the mental and  medical aspects of competitive sports. Held from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at Vieux  Carr Restaurant/Afterthought Bar in Little Rocks Hillcrest area, the Science Caf  is a relaxed opportunity for monthly exchanges with various experts. Admission  is free and no reservations are needed. A variety of food and beverages are  available for purchase. Science Caf was created in partnership with UAMS,  Arkansas Biosciences Institute, University of Arkansas at Little Rock College of Science and  Mathematics, Southwestern Energy, Arkansas INBRE, Central Arkansas Section - American Chemical  Society, UAMS-Graduate School, KUAR-FM89, Vieux Carr/The  Afterthought, and the Arkansas Academy of Sciences.

 

 

Science  Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.7 million monthly unique  users)

“Cancer:  Trapping the Escape Artist”

May 11,  2010

 

 

Cancer uses devious means to evade  treatment and survive. One prime example is the way tumors express anti-cell  death (anti-apoptotic) proteins to resist chemotherapy and radiation. In a paper  published online in the journal Cell Death and Disease on May 6, Maurizio  Pellecchia, Ph.D., and colleagues outline how the six anti-apoptotic proteins in  the Bcl-2 family are expressed differently in different cancers. As a result,  any therapy designed to defeat these proteins, and thus enhance the cell death  caused by most cancer treatments, must target the exact anti-apoptotic protein  the cancer is expressing to be effective. However, even targeting the right  protein might not be enough, as cancers often express more than one and can  select for an "escape" protein and continue to thrive. Related research may have  solved that problem. The Pellecchia laboratory, in collaboration with Coronado  Biosciences and Virginia Commonwealth University, has been working on just such  a pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor, and may have found it in a compound called BI-97C1. A  paper published online on May 5 in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry describes  how BI-97C1, an optically pure derivative of a cottonseed extract called  gossypol, inhibits all six anti-apoptotic Bcl -2 family proteins. This broad  spectrum approach could make current cancer treatments more effective by  controlling all six of these proteins and allowing malignant cells to  die.

 

 

National  Science Foundation (Arlington, Va.: 163,400 monthly unique  users)

“NSF  Launches Website in Support of National Lab Day”

May 11,  2010

 

 

The National Science Foundation has  launched a Web-based resource for scientists seeking guidance on how to  effectively interact with K-12 teachers as part of National Lab Day, a  grassroots effort to invigorate science education. National Lab Day is a  volunteer effort designed to form local "communities of support" around science,  technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) teachers and to connect them with  STEM professionals who will share their expertise as well as their excitement  and passion for their disciplines. NSF is a partner in National Lab Day, along  with other federal science agencies and the National Science Teachers  Association, the American Chemical  Society, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the John D. and  Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. National Lab Day is a response to a call to  action made by President Obama at the National Academy of Sciences in April,  2009. The President said during his address, "I want to persuade you to spend  time in the classroom, talking and showing young people what it is that your  work can mean, and what it means to you ... to think about new and creative ways  to engage young people in science and engineering ... encourage young people to  be makers of things, not just consumers of things."

 

 

Shreveport Times (Shreveport, La.: daily circulation  52,267)

“Community  news: Byrd grad presents research at meeting”

May 12,  2010

 

 

Jonathan N. Taylor, a 2006 graduate  of C.E. Byrd Math/Science Magnet, presented his research at the 43rd annual  "Meeting-in-Miniature" of the Dallas-Fort  Worth section of the American Chemical Society. His research involved  the development and synthesis of light activated amyloid peptides. Amyloid  peptides are short chains of amino acids that cause insoluble plaque formations,  a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This  research allows the formation of these amyloid plaques to be turned on or off  using pulses of light.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Carbon  Capture Journal

“US scientists’ plan to  eliminate coal power CO2 emissions by  2030”

May 11,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

 

A team including members from NASA  Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University Earth Institute have  outlined a way to phase out US CO2 emissions from coal use by 2030. The global  climate problem becomes tractable if CO2 emissions from coal use are phased out  rapidly and emissions from unconventional fossil fuels (e.g., oil shale and tar  sands) are prohibited, says the paper in the June edition of the American  Chemical Society’s journal Environmental  Science & Technology.

 

 

Nanotechnology  Now

“Cobalt catalysts for simple  water splitting”

May 11,  2010

 

Researchers from UC Davis and the  Massachusetts Institute of Technology are studying how a simple cobalt catalyst  can split water molecules. Such inexpensive catalysts could one day be used to  convert sunlight into fuel that can run domestic fuel cells. A paper describing  the work is published online this month by the Journal of the American Chemical  Society.

Reuters (New York, N.Y.: “viewed by more than 1 billion  monthly”)

“Oasys  Water Commercializing Forward Osmosis Membrane”

May 10,  2010

 

 

Oasys Water Inc., today announced  the commercialization of a high performance forward osmosis (FO) membrane as a  next step towards the introduction of disruptive, lower cost desalination and  water reuse technology. Forward osmosis is well known to be an emerging  alternative for lower cost desalination, but thus far two developments have  limited its widespread adoption; a recoverable solute and a membrane with both  high flow rates and high salt rejection… A publication in this month’s Environmental Science and Technology (ES&T) journal entitled High Performance Thin-Film Composite Forward Osmosis  Membrane authored by Professor Menachem Elimelech, Chair of Chemical Engineering  at Yale  University, details the  specifications and performance of the FO membrane. Through an exclusive license  and sponsored research agreement, Oasys has rights to patented technology from  Yale and is now expanding the collaboration to further promote industry  standards for forward osmosis.

 

 

WDIV-TV (Detroit. Mich.: 1 million monthly  unique users)

“Study Finds  'Green' Exercise Boosts Mood”

May 10,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) press release

 

 

New research suggests "green"  exercise might help lift a blue mood. Experts said green exercise is any  physical activity done outside, in nature. This can include typical exercises,  like jogging or biking, or less intense activities, such as gardening.  Researchers pooled data from 10 studies and found that just five minutes of such  green exercise a day benefited mental health. The study also found being near  water seemed to help the most. According to the research, both men and women had  similar improvements in self-esteem after green exercise, but the biggest boost  was seen in the youngest participants. This review of research is published in  the American Chemical Society's Environmental  Science & Technology journal.

 

 

Science  Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.7 million monthly unique  users)

“New  Technique Permits Development of Enzyme Tool  Kit”

May 10,  2010

 

 

An Arizona State University graduate student, Jinglin Fu,  in collaboration with Biodesign Institute researchers Neal Woodbury and Stephen  Albert Johnston, has pioneered a technique that improves on scientists' ability  to harness and modulate enzyme activity. The new approach, reported in the  Journal of the American Chemical  Society could have wide applicability for designing a range of  industrial catalysts, health care diagnostics and therapies centered on  understanding the control of enzymatic activity. Enzymes, key catalysts that  speed up the reactions inside every cell, are critical for life. As Neal  Woodbury, chief scientist the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University notes, "all the processes that  happen inside of your body, essentially without exception, are run by enzymes."  Enzymes are also a prized tool in biomedical research, aiding the development of  diagnostic tests and therapeutics for a range of human  diseases.

 

 

RedOrbit (Dallas, Tex.: 1.8 million monthly unique  users)

“Nano  Parfait A Treat For Scientists”

May 10,  2010

 

 

In two new papers, Rice University researchers report using  ultracentrifugation (UCF) to create highly purified samples of carbon nanotube  species. One team, led by Rice Professor Junichiro Kono and graduate students  Erik Haroz and William Rice, has made a small but significant step toward the  dream of an efficient nationwide electrical grid that depends on highly  conductive quantum nanowire. The other, led by Rice Professor Bruce Weisman and  graduate student Saunab Ghosh, employed UCF to prepare structurally sorted  batches of semiconducting nanotubes that could find critical uses in medicine  and electronics. The process involves suspending mixtures of single-walled  carbon nanotubes in combinations of liquids of different densities. When spun by  a centrifuge at up to 250,000 g – that's 250,000 times the force of gravity –  the nanotubes migrate to the liquids that match their own particular densities.  After several hours in the centrifuge, the test tube becomes a colorful parfait  with layers of purified nanotubes. Each species has its own electronic and  optical characteristics, all of which are useful in various ways. Kono's lab  reported its results recently in the online edition of ACS Nano. Kono is a professor in electrical  and computer engineering and professor of physics and  astronomy.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique  users)

“Nanotechnology sensor  detects type 1 diabetes in breath”

May 11,  2010

 

 

Acetone is found in a healthy  person’s breath, but the concentration is only about 900 ppb (particles per  billion); in people suffering from type 1 diabetes, however, the concentration  is double that; and in the case of a ketoacidosis it can be even higher. That’s  why the sensor developed at ETH Zurich works so well: it can detect as few as  20 ppb of acetone and even works at extremely high humidity levels of over 90  percent – like in the human breath. Sotiris Pratsinis, professor of particle  technology at the Institute of Process  Engineering, and his team showcased the novel sensor  on May 1 in the journal Analytical  Chemistry of the American Chemical Society. They used a substrate  with gold electrodes for the sensor and coated it with an ultra-thin  semiconductor film made of nanoparticles. These particles consisted of tungsten  oxide mixed with silicon, thus greatly improving the sensitivity of the sensor.  The mixture is produced in a flame at a temperature of over 2200°  C.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Our  Beloved Earth

“Misleading Pesticide Labels May  Be Dangerous to Your Health”

May 11,  2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press  release

 

 

Often when people notice an  infestation of bugs—pesky ants in the corner of the kitchen, for instance—their  first reaction is to blast them in a smothering cloud of pesticide spray.  Unfortunately, the labels on many pesticides don't do much to deter people from  overdoing it. Research presented at a recent meeting of the American Chemical Society finds that most  pesticide labels imply that "if a little bit is good, more is better." Thus  comes the pesticide cloud, which puts you at risk of dangerous chemical  exposure.

 

 

Science  Magazine News

“Advanced Engine-Control System  Reduces Biodiesel Fuel Consumption and  Emissions”

May 10,  2010

 

Operating truck engines on a blend  of biodiesel and ordinary diesel fuel dramatically reduces the emission of  particulate matter, or soot. However, the most modern and efficient diesel  engines burning biodiesel emit up to 40 percent more nitrogen oxides at some  operating conditions, and fuel economy declines by as much as 20 percent. Unlike  conventional diesel, biodiesel contains oxygen, and the researchers have shown  that this presence of oxygen is responsible for the majority of the higher  emission of nitrogen oxides, said Gregory Shaver, an assistant professor of  mechanical engineering. The researchers found that nitrogen oxide emissions rise  by a higher percentage in engines equipped with this exhaust-recirculation  technology compared with older engines that do not. Findings are detailed in a  research paper that has been posted online and that will appear in an upcoming  issue of the American Chemical Society journal Energy &  Fuels.

The  Independent (London, England: daily circulation  183,547)

“Peter  Stanford: How to change your life in five minutes a day. Go  outside”

May 9,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) press release

 

 

The first week of May, the gardening  bibles intone, is when those cascades of grape-like petals on the hitherto bare,  twisted branches of wisteria turn overnight into a chorus of violet-blue  flowers. And this year, for once, nature has played by the rules: the wisteria  blossom has magically arrived with all the punctuality of Mussolini-era trains.  Right now, houses and gardens are clothed in it, and there is something about  the spectacle of stone walls, fences, gable ends or even whole (ideally,  thatched), cottages cloaked in these exotic, ostentatious, outsized and very  indiscreet blooms that pleases the eye, lifts the spirit and draws attention  away – briefly – from worries about hung parliaments, double-dip recessions,  crises in the eurozone and bitter economic medicine ahead… But the benefits of  spotting an eye-catching wisteria, whether it be on a Notting Hill mansion or a  council house in Kirkcaldy, may also improve our mental and physical health,  according to a study published last week by a team from Essex University, headed by Professor Jules  Pretty, in the American Chemical Society's  journal Environmental Science & Technology. "We all feel," says  Pretty, an environmental scientist, "that spring is a wonderful time for nature,  but what we have been trying to do is measure that feeling accurately and  therefore lift it out of the realms of quackery."

 

 

OneIndia (Bangalore, India: 7.3 million monthly unique  users)

“Skin  cancer-treating prescription drug could boost effects of HIV  vaccines”

May 6,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

A new weapon in the fight against  hepatitis C and HIV is available in the form of a prescription drug, say  researchers. The drug already approved to treat genital warts and skin cancer  can apparently boost the effectiveness of future vaccines for these bacterial  and viral diseases. John Pesce and colleagues at the Naval Medical Research Center and UC-Berkeley note that vaccines  prepared from weakened or inactivated viruses or bacteria have had enormous  success in preventing polio, influenza, and other diseases. However, vaccines  containing living or weakened viruses cannot be used for HIV, hepatitis C, and  other devastating diseases due to safety concerns. Scientists are instead trying  to develop a new generation of vaccines, made with DNA or proteins from  infectious agents that can prevent illness without carrying a risk of causing  the diseases. These findings appear in ACS' Molecular Pharmaceutics, a bi-monthly  journal.

 

 

ContactLenses.co.uk

“Green  tea `is good for the eyes`”

May 10,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

People who regularly drink green tea  may benefit from improved vision, according to a new study. Research published  in the Journal of Agricultural and Food  Chemistry showed that regular consumption of the substance is  effective in penetrating the tissues of the eye, which could help fight glaucoma  and other eye diseases. Experts have long thought that antioxidants found in  green tea, known as catechins, are capable of protecting the eye, but until now  it was unknown whether they could actually penetrate the organ. Study leader Chi  Pui Pang said that the effects of the drink may last up to 20 hours, as the  retina is the part of the eye which absorbs the highest concentration of  catechins from the tea.

 

 

St.  Petersburg Times (St. Petersburg, Fla.: daily circulation  278,888)

“You  have oil spill questions, we have answers”

May 8,  2010

 

 

What would happen to Tampa Bay  Water's expensive desalination plant if the oil spill reached here? If any bit  of oil got into the plant, it would be bad. But so far, officials do not expect  the oil to reach TECO's Big Bend plant, where the desal plant pulls its water  from, said Tampa Bay Water spokeswoman Michelle Rapp…What's in the chemical  they're pouring on the oil and will it do more harm than good? Corexit is one of  the main dispersants, which break up oil into tiny droplets that sink below the  water's surface, where naturally occurring bacteria consume them. Without  dispersants, oil stays on the surface, where bacteria can't get at it, according  to Nalco, the Illinois manufacturer. Nalco officials say  Corexit's active ingredient is an emulsifier found in ice cream and is not  harmful to marine life. Many scientists and environmentalists strongly disagree.  Tarpon Springs' Southern Shrimp Alliance recently sent a letter to the  Environmental Protection Agency and NOAA arguing that while the dispersants may  reduce the oil's effect on shoreline habitat they may be harming countless  species of marine life in the process. Sources: Reuters, Slate.com,  International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation Limited, Chemical & Engineering News, the  Sunshine and Shores Foundation, Discovery News, New York  Times.

 

 

Discovery  News (Silver Spring, Md.: 3.1 million monthly unique  users)

“Prescription  Tattoos: Coming to a Pharmacy Near You”

May 7,  2010

 

 

Getting inked could save your life.  Scientists from Microsoft and The Draper Laboratory are developing medical  tattoos that would stop hackers from messing with pacemakers and drastically  reduce the number of needle sticks needed to monitor glucose levels. Medical  tattoos could also be adapted to monitor any number of other medically important  molecules. "We can follow the same trends as a finger stick glucometer," said  Heather Clark, a scientist at the Draper Laboratory near Boston and a co-author of a  recent article in the journal Analytical  Chemistry that describes her team's glucose monitoring  tattoo.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique  users)

“New nanocatalyst improves  fuel cell technology”

May 9,  2010

 

 

Long hampered by high manufacturing  costs and durability issues, fuel cell technology could overcome those obstacles  and take a significant step towards mainstream adoption thanks to a finding by a  Texas  A&M University chemical engineering professor.  Investigating the use of alternative materials as catalysts in fuel cells, Perla  Balbuena, professor in the university’s Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical  Engineering, has found a class of composite materials that show early  indications of being just as effective — and even more durable — than the costly  platinum catalysts typically used in fuel cells. The findings from her work,  which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), appear in the January  edition of the Journal of Physical Chemistry  Letters. Because of their potential as a clean source of virtually  continuous energy, fuel cells are a chief area of interest to a wide variety of  entities, including automobile manufacturers and the U.S.  government, which has invested nearly a billion dollars in research and  development of the technology.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Joyfully  Fit

“Aromatherapy Boosts Immune  Response”

May 7,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Stop and smell the roses or the  orange, lavender or basil. Recent research done at the University of Tokyo and published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry reveals how fragrances are able to reduce the negative impact of stress on our  immune system.

 

 

 

Atomic  City Underground (Knoxville, Tenn.)

“A  better way to test groundwater”

May 9,  2010

 

A new technology for testing  contaminated groundwater offers potential for speeding monitoring efforts,  lowering costs and producing highly accurate results. According to information  released by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the proprietary system is called  membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry. "The system combines a membrane  tube and an ion mobility analysis system, or analyzer, creating a single  procedure for in-situ monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water." The  research effort was published in the journal, Analytical Chemistry. ORNL's lead researcher, Jun Xu, said in a statement, "Our  technology represents a low-cost yet highly accurate way to monitor contaminants  in water and air."

 

Medical News Today (U.K.: 1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Effects Of Vaccines For HIV And Other Diseases Could Be Boosted By Prescription Drug”

May 6, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

A prescription drug already approved to treat genital warts and skin cancer may have a new use in boosting the effectiveness of future vaccines for bacterial and viral diseases, such as hepatitis C and HIV (the AIDS virus). These findings appear in ACS' Molecular Pharmaceutics, a bi-monthly journal. John Pesce and colleagues at the Naval Medical  Research Center and UC-Berkeley note that vaccines prepared from weakened or inactivated viruses or bacteria have had enormous success in preventing polio, influenza, and other diseases. However, vaccines containing living or weakened viruses cannot be used for HIV, hepatitis C, and other devastating diseases due to safety concerns… The report identifies a promising candidate in the form of imiquimod, an immune-boosting drug already in general use. The scientists coated imiquimod with dextran-based microparticles in hopes of increasing the efficiency of cellular uptake by cells associated with immune response initiation. Sure enough, the coated drug significantly boosted levels of inflammatory cytokines in laboratory cultures of immune cells from mice.

 

 

Thaindian News (Bangkok, Thailand: 2.9 million monthly unique users)

“Hand washing ‘improves quality of stored drinking water in poor countries’”

May 6, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

Hand-washing, long recognized as an effective germ-fighting practice, also appears to play an important role in improving the quality of stored drinking water in poor countries, say researchers. Boffins have reported a dramatic new real-world evidence supporting the idea that hand washing can prevent the spread of water-borne disease. It appears in a new study showing a connection between fecal bacteria contamination on hands, fecal contamination of stored drinking water, and health in households in a developing country in Africa. The study is in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology, a semi-monthly journal. The scientists found a strong link between fecal contamination on the hands of household residents and bacterial contamination in stored water in Dar   es Salaam, Tanzania. Stored water contained nearly 100 times more fecal bacteria than the source where it was collected.

 

 

The Medical News (Sydney, Australia: 517,900 monthly unique users)

“New combination eye drops effective in treating bacterial keratitis”

May 6, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Scientists are reporting development of a potential new way of enabling patients with bacterial keratitis to stick with the extraordinarily intensive treatment needed for this potentially blinding eye infection. The disease affects more than 500,000 people each year worldwide, including 30,000 people in the United States. The study is in ACS' Molecular Pharmaceutics, a bi-monthly journal. Howida Kamal Ibrahim and colleagues explain that bacterial keratitis is a rapidly-progressing infection of the cornea, the clear tissue covering the front of the eye. The scientists describe the development of a new two-in-one formula that combines the antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drug into a single medication. In tests with lab animals, the drops delivered five times more medication to the eye and it remained there three times longer than existing medicine, the scientists say.

 

 

New Scientist (London, England: weekly circulation 170,000)

“Is water the key to cheaper nanoelectronics?”

May 6, 2010

 

Water and electronics don't usually mix. But a splash of the wet stuff could help make nanoelectronic manufacturing both quicker and cheaper. Today's electronic circuit boards already include nanoscale components, but they are tricky to make. To get complicated nanostructures on a silicon chip it is sometimes necessary to grow them in separate layers and then transfer these one by one onto the final chip to build them into working components. Grégory Schneider and Cees Dekker at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience in Delft, the Netherlands, have found a way to use water to quickly and easily transfer layers from one surface to another. They exploit the fact that different materials have different hydrophilicity – the tendency to attract water through transient hydrogen bonds. (Nano Letters)

 

 

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (New Rochelle,  N.Y.: bi-monthly circulation 65,000)

“Peptides may hold 'missing link' to life”

May 6, 2010

 

Emory University scientists have discovered that simple peptides can organize into bi-layer membranes. The finding suggests a "missing link" between the pre-biotic Earth's chemical inventory and the organizational scaffolding essential to life. Chemistry graduate student Yan Liang captured images of the peptides as they aggregated into molten globular structures, and self-assembled into bi-layer membranes. The results of that experiment were recently published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society. "In order to form nuclei, which become the templates for growth, the peptides first repel water," says Liang, who is now an Emory post-doctoral fellow in neuroscience. "Once the peptides form the template, we can now see how they assemble from the outer edges." In addition to providing clues to the origins of life, the findings may shed light on protein assemblies related to Alzheimer's disease, Type 2 diabetes, and dozens of other serious ailments.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique users)

“Quantum dots go with the flow”

May 6, 2010

 

Quantum dots may be small. But they usually don’t let anyone push them around. Now, however, JQI Fellow Edo Waks and colleagues have devised a self-adjusting remote-control system that can place a dot 6 nanometers long to within 45 nm of any desired location. That’s the equivalent of picking up golf balls around a living room and putting them on a coffee table – automatically, from 100 miles away. QDs can be moved with “optical tweezers” – a system that sets up a gradient of forces from multiple laser beams – or by electrophoresis, in which a microscopic object with a surface charge can be pushed through a fluid or gel by applying a constant electric field. But now a research team headed by Waks and Benjamin Shapiro of UMD’s Fischell Department of Bio-Engineering has invented a fully automated apparatus that controls the position of a single QD by manipulating the fluid in which the dots are immersed. The system exploits a phenomenon called electroosmosis, in which liquids with polar molecules such as water are pulled in specific directions by applied electrical fields. (Nano Letters)

 

 

Water Technology Online (Latham, N.Y.)

“Jerald Schnoor, leader in water sustainability, to receive the 2010 Clarke Prize”

May 6, 2010

 

 

The National Water Research Institute (NWRI) announced today that environmental engineer Jerald L. Schnoor, Ph.D., of the University of Iowa will be the seventeenth recipient of the NWRI Athalie Richardson Irvine Clarke Prize for excellence in water research. Schnoor was selected because of his leadership and impact on promoting the sustainable use of water. The 2010 Clarke Prize will be presented to Schnoor on Thursday, July 15, 2010, at the Seventeenth Annual Clarke Prize Lecture and Award Ceremony, to be held at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Orange   County, California. Schnoor is not just a leader in environmental science and engineering, but he is also considered a major intellectual leader in the world of scientific publishing. He is the author of over 150 peer-reviewed journal articles, edited or authored seven textbooks, and has served on the editorial board of several journals, such as Aquatic Sciences and Water Resources Research. He is best known, however, for his role as Editor-in-Chief of Environmental Science & Technology, the leading journal in the world on environmental engineering and science.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

University of Delaware’s UDaily

“Klein appointed Dan Rich Chair of Energy, director of UD Energy Institute”

May 6, 2010

 

Michael Klein has been named the University  of Delaware's Dan Rich Chair of Energy and director of the UD Energy Institute (UDEI), Provost Tom Apple announced today. The appointment is effective July 1. Klein, a native of Delaware and both a UD alumnus and former faculty member, currently is the Board of Governors Professor of Chemical Engineering at Rutgers University. He served as dean of engineering at Rutgers from 1998 to 2008. Ranked among the top 100 authors for citations in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research, Klein has written over 200 research articles. He is editor-in-chief of the American Chemical Society journal Energy and Fuels and the reaction engineering topical editor for the Encyclopedia of Catalysis.

 

 

Green Car Website

“Biodiesel problems exposed?”

May 7, 2010

 

A study by researchers from the US Naval Research Laboratory and the University  of Oklahoma has found biodiesel is susceptible to biological degradation from anaerobic bacteria – much more so than traditional hydrocarbons. According to their findings, the organisms hydrolyse biodiesel and convert it to fatty acid intermediates. As these intermediates are acidic the pitting corrosion is accelerated. Their paper, entitled Energy & Fuels, suggests that in a fuel environment anaerobic conditions prevail whenever heterotrophic microbial respiration consumes oxygen at a rate that surpasses diffusion.

Times  of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.15  million)

“Hand-washing  improves quality of stored water”

May 6,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

 

Hand-washing, long recognised as an  effective germ-fighting practice, also appears to play an important role in  improving the quality of stored drinking water in poor countries, say  researchers. Boffins have reported a dramatic new real-world evidence supporting  the idea that hand washing can prevent the spread of water-borne disease. It  appears in a new study showing a connection between fecal bacteria contamination  on hands, fecal contamination of stored drinking water, and health in households  in a developing country in Africa. The study is  in ACS’ Environmental Science &  Technology, a semi-monthly journal. The scientists found a strong  link between fecal contamination on the hands of household residents and  bacterial contamination in stored water in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Stored water contained  nearly 100 times more fecal bacteria than the source where it was  collected.

 

 

Times  of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.15  million)

“'Coffee  ring' may help detect disease”

May 6,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Ever noticed the spot that is left  behind after spilled coffee on a table evaporates? Well, the next time it  happens, try and observe that the spot has a darker ring around its perimeter  that contains a much higher concentration of particles than the center. Since  this 'coffee ring' phenomenon occurs with many liquids after they have  evaporated, scientists have suggested that such rings can be used for examining  blood or other fluids for disease markers by using biosensing devices.  "Understanding micro- and nano-particle transportation within evaporating liquid  droplets has great potential for several technological applications, including  nanostructure self-assembly, lithography patterning, particle coating, and  biomolecule concentration and separation," said study's lead author Chih-Ming  Ho, the Ben Rich-Lockheed Martin Professor at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of  Engineering and Applied Science. The research appears in the current issue of  the Journal of Physical Chemistry  B and is available online.

 

 

Science  News (Washington D.C.: bi-weekly circulation  130,000)

“Decon  Green can clean up the most toxic messes, developers  claim”

May 5,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

U.S. Army scientists have invented a  new cleaning product that can decontaminate surfaces tainted with nerve gas,  anthrax spores and other nasty substances — and they say it’s environmentally  friendly to boot. Until now, chemical and biological warfare agents such as  mustard gas, the nerve agent VX, anthrax spores or radioactive isotopes have  each required their own cleaning agents, says research chemist George Wagner of  the U.S. Army’s Edgewood Chemical Biological Center in Aberdeen, Md. “There  wasn’t really any broad-spectrum decontaminant,” he says. And some of the  cleaners that are typically used, such as products containing chlorine bleach,  aren’t very environmentally friendly. Wagner and his colleagues tested their  product on several surfaces, they report in the April 7 Industrial & Engineering Chemistry  Research, including plain panels of aluminum and panels covered in a  chemically resistant paint typically used on military  vehicles.

 

 

Associated  Content (Denver, Colo.:  23.8 million monthly unique users)

“Drink  Green Tea to Reduce the Risk of Glaucoma”

May 5,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

What would life be like without the  ability to see? Glaucoma is a disease that damages the optic nerve - slowly and  insidiously in many cases. According to a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry drinking green tea may help to protect the eye against oxidative damage which  can lead to glaucoma. Researchers gave rats a green tea extract and then looked  at their eye tissues. They found that the catechins in the green tea extract had  been taken up by the various tissues in the eye - including the retina - and  that the tissues were protected against oxidative stress for up to twenty hours  after being exposed to the green tea. Although this isn't a human study, it's  encouraging that the green tea catechins successfully reached the tissues of the  eye. Although this research is still unconfirmed in humans, a person would have  to drink four to six cups of green tea a day or take a green tea extract  supplement to prevent glaucoma.

 

 

Medical  News Today (U.K.:  1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Simplifying  Treatment Of A Serious Eye Infection”

May 6,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists are reporting development  of a potential new way of enabling patients with bacterial keratitis to stick  with the extraordinarily intensive treatment needed for this potentially  blinding eye infection. The disease affects more than 500,000 people each year  worldwide, including 30,000 people in the United  States. The study is in ACS' Molecular Pharmaceutics, a bi-monthly  journal. The scientists describe the development of a new two-in-one formula  that combines the antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drug into a single  medication. The eye drops contain nano-sized particles - each about 1/50,000th  the width of a human hair - of an antibiotic (gatifloxacin) and an  anti-inflammatory drug (prednisolone) coated with a substance that keeps the  medicine in the eye longer.

 

 

Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (Pittsburgh, Pa.: daily circulation  150,253)

“Young  Achiever: Nicholas Didycz”

May 6,  2010

 

 

Nicholas is a junior at North Hills High  School. He belongs to the Latin Club and is a member  of the fencing team. Nicholas placed first in the second-year category of the  2010 Secondary School Chemistry Contest sponsored by the Pittsburgh section of the  American Chemical Society. The  annual competition is open to students from Pennsylvania, West  Virginia and Ohio. "I wasn't expecting to win. A lot of the  questions on the test were really hard, so I was pleasantly  surprised."

 

 

KVAL.com (Eugene, Ore.: 84,400 monthly unique  users)

“Diet Detective's Summer  Fruit and Vegetable Picks: Sweet Bell Peppers, Red Raspberries and  Apricots”

May 6,  2010

 

 

Here are a couple of summer fruits  and a vegetable for you to enjoy. Red Raspberries. Why: Have you eaten a  sweet-tasting raspberry? Raspberries are much lower in calories than you would  think - only 64 calories for 1 cup. And just 1 cup provides 32.2 mg, or 54  percent of the recommended daily value, of vitamin C; 32 percent of your day's  supply of fiber; and 41 percent of the daily recommended value for manganese,  which is a trace mineral that helps to catalyze enzymes required for various  body functions. Health Perks: According to a study conducted by researchers A.  Venketeshwer Rao and Dawn M. Snyder from the Department of Nutritional Sciences  at the University of Toronto, Canada, and reported in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry,  red raspberries contain "a wide range of polyphenolic phytochemicals  (flavonoids, phenolic acids, lignans and tannins)," some of which may function  as anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic and protect against LDL oxidation,  thus reducing cardiovascular diseases.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Biofuels  Journal

“Herb Munsterman Joins DuPont  Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol as General Counsel and Senior Leadership Team  Member”

May 5,  2010

 

 

Herb Munsterman has joined DuPont  Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol as General Counsel and a member of the company's  Senior Leadership Team. Herb is an experienced general corporate attorney and a  registered patent attorney with law firm and corporate in-house experience. He  is a member of the American Chemical  Society.

 

 

Science  Magazine news

“Proteins in Unroasted Coffee  Beans May Become Next-Generation  Insecticides”

May 6,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

The study suggests a new use for one  of the most important tropical crops in the world, and it appears in ACS'  Journal of Agricultural and Food  Chemistry, a bi-weekly publication. Peas, beans and some other plant  seeds contain proteins, called globulins, which ward off insects. The  scientists’ tests against cowpea weevil larva, insects used as models for  studying the insecticidal activity of proteins, showed that tiny amounts of the  coffee proteins quickly killed up to half of the  insects.

iVillage (New York, N.Y.: 9.2 million monthly unique  users)

“Need a  Lift? Spend 5 Minutes Outdoors”

May 4,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) press release

 

 

Research released this past weekend  in the journal Environmental Science &  Technology suggests that spending time in nature can boost both mood  and self-esteem. No wonder bears and raccoons have so few complexes. According  to the study, just five minutes of exercise in the great outdoors can give you a  mental health lift. The researchers at the University of Essex examined data from 1,252 people, and  looked at activities as diverse as farming, gardening, walking, boating,  horseback-riding, cycling and fishing. Though everyone benefited from so-called  “green exercise,” younger people and those with mental health problems seemed to  have the most positive improvements to their mental states. If, like me, you  live in a bustling metropolis, fear not: frolicking in public parks and gardens  proved just as beneficial as working on a farm or hiking in a meadow. The only  natural environments that seemed to have an edge over the others were ones with  water. According to lead researcher Jules Pretty, “A blue and green environment  seems even better for health.” Past studies have shown that even a view of  natural landscape from your window can improve your  outlook.

 

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen,  Va.: 1.5  million monthly unique users)

“Save  the date: American Chemical Society National Meeting in Boston, Aug.  22-26”

May 4,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

 

What better venue than Boston — with its famed  medical institutions — for a major scientific conference with the theme  "Chemistry for Preventing & Combating Disease"? This historic Northeast city  will, in fact, be the setting for such an event - the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 240th National  Meeting & Exposition, Aug. 22-26. In addition to focusing on  health, the gathering will offer print, broadcast, and online journalists a rich  assortment of spot news and feature possibilities with nearly 8,000  presentations on new discoveries that span science's horizons — from astronomy  to zoology. The topics include food and nutrition, medicine, health, energy, the  environment, and other fields where chemistry plays a central role.  Presentations will take place at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center and at downtown  hotels.

 

 

American  Scientist (Research Triangle Park, N.C.: bi-monthly circulation  72,959)

“Infection, Kill  Thyself”

May 4,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists are turning harmful  bacteria into agents of their own destruction. In an effort to create  antibacterial wound dressings, a new material comes laden with microbial booby  traps that are triggered by the activity of harmful bacteria, scientists report  online April 20 in the Journal of the  American Chemical Society. Bacterial infections are a serious problem  for patients with burns and other wounds, says study coauthor Toby Jenkins of  the University of Bath in England. While many wound dressings  today contain silver to thwart microbial activity, the metal can hurt human  cells that are trying to regrow. The silver may also cull out weaker bacteria,  leaving the survivors even more of a threat than before. Jenkins and his  colleagues have set out to build a better dressing by peppering it with tiny  capsulelike vesicles that look to bacteria exactly like cells prime for  infection. But when the bacteria do attack, they release an antibacterial agent  that kills them and any of their kind that happen to be  nearby.

 

 

Yahoo!  Finance (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 9.2 million monthly unique  users)

“Idera  Pharmaceuticals Reports First Quarter 2010 Financial Results and Provides  Pipeline Update”

May 4,  2010

 

 

Idera Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq:  IDRA - News), a biotechnology company engaged in the discovery and development  of DNA- and RNA-based drug candidates targeted to Toll-like Receptors (TLR),  today reported financial results for the first quarter ended March 31, 2010. “We  are very encouraged by the interim clinical data with IMO-2125, a TLR9 agonist,  in the difficult-to-treat null responder HCV patients. The data presented at  EASL 2010 show that IMO-2125 monotherapy for four weeks was well tolerated and  induced dose-dependent increases in natural interferon-alpha and other antiviral  proteins,” said Sudhir Agrawal, D.Phil., Chief Executive Officer and Chief  Scientific Officer… Scientific Highlights A paper entitled “Peptide conjugation  at the 5'-end of oligodeoxynucleotides abrogates Toll-like receptor 9-mediated  immune stimulatory activity” appeared in Bioconjugate Chemistry, 2010. A paper  entitled “Impact of nature and length of linker incorporated in agonists on  Toll-like receptor 9-mediated immune responses” appeared in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 2010.

 

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen,  Va.: 1.5  million monthly unique users)

“Strategy to Quantify, Purify  Surface Proteins Also Shows Effects on Protein  Translocation”

May 4,  2010

 

 

It's always good when you can get  two discoveries for the price of one. A strategy developed by scientists at  Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to quantify and purify proteins on the  surface membranes of cells has also revealed other proteins that have  potentially novel roles in cell substrates. Even more important, the researchers  also found that deletion of a type II secretion protein had minimal effects on  total protein expression, but significant effects on protein translocation to  the cell membrane. Their results will appear in the Journal of Proteome Research… Developing a  strategy that can probe changes in membrane protein abundance will improve the  understanding of overall biological cellular functions. The PNNL team met this  challenge by first enriching surface membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella  oneidensis MR-1 using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe, which allowed  labeling of the surface exposed peptides.

 

 

TMCNet.com (Norwalk, Conn.: 973,000 monthly unique  users)

“Science trip to  D.C. a success”

May 4,  2010

 

 

Four students from St. Christopher  Middle School in the Town of Tonawanda were presented a 1st place trophy Monday by U.S.  Energy Secretary Steven Chu in Washington D.C. The model solar car they raced Sunday in  several heats beat out similar ones built by 37 participating middle schools  across the country to compete in this year's national Science Bowl competition…  The event was sponsored by the Department of Energy to encourage a generation of  students to apply their future talents to jobs in math and science. It is the  largest academic competition of its kind. The regional solar car competition  serving as a qualifier for the Science Bowl this year was organized by Canisius College's American Chemical  Society. The event took place at the St. Joe's Collegiate  Institute.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Tobacco  Use

“Coffee Beans May Be Newest  Stress-Buster”

May 4,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Just sniffing that first hot cup of  coffee in the morning may help ease some stresses you might be feeling, a South  Korean trial indicates. When rats inhaled the aroma of roasted coffee beans, a  number of genes were activated, including some that produce proteins with  healthful antioxidant activity, the researchers reported. “The meaning of it is  not totally clear yet,” said Dr. Peter R. Martin, director of the Institute of Coffee  Studies at Vanderbilt University. “What it does show is that  coffee smells do change the brain to some degree, and it behooves us to  understand why that is happening.” The findings, from a team led by Han-Seok Seo  at Seoul National University in South Korea, were expected to be  published in the June 25 issue of the Journal  of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

 

 

Spices  Online

“Ginger Spice Induces Hara-Kiri  In Leukemia Cells”

May 4,  2010

 

 

Wouldn’t it be nice to know that  every time you took a mouthful of healthy food any cancer cells lurking in your  body would take fright and commit suicide? Well that’s probably what happens  when you drink a bottle of REAL ginger ale, have a cup of ginger tea or eat a  bunch of those delicious slices of pink ginger with your sushi meal. This is  more or less what occurs according to new research published in the February  2010 edition of the Journal of Agricultural  and Food Chemistry. Those of us who keep an eye on these things have  known for many years that several compounds found in the ginger rhizome have  anti-cancer activity. Phytonutrients such as zingerone, gingerol, curcumin and  paradol have strong anti-mutagenic activity. Not only do they protect against  DNA damage and the inflammation that underlies most types of cancer, but they  also have the ability to kill existing cancer cells. Now researchers based in  Taiwan and the USA  have discovered that another ginger-based compound, shogaol also has powerful  anti-cancer activities.

USA Today (McLean, Va.:  daily circulation 1.8 million)

“How  to improve mood? Study touts green exercise”

May 3,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) press release

 

 

A simple, free way to boost mental  health is to exercise outdoors, whether walking, gardening or cycling, concludes  a recent study on "green" exercise. "Every green environment improved both  self-esteem and mood," even urban parks, says the study by Jo Barton and Jules  Pretty of the United  Kingdom's University of Essex. Places with water gave an extra  lift. As little as five minutes of "green" exercise -- activity in the presence  of nature -- benefited all types of people, according to the researchers, who  analyzed data on 1,252 people from ten prior British studies. Their findings  appear in the American Chemical Society's Environmental Science & Technology journal.

 

 

Yahoo!  News (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 37.9 million monthly unique  users)

“U.S.  could stop coal emissions in 20 years”

May 3,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

 

A new study claims that the  U.S. could be free of emissions from  coal-fired power plants in 20 years using only technologies that currently exist  or could be ready in the next decade.  The one thing holding us back, according  to the authors, is political will. The study, published in the latest issue of  Environmental Science and  Technology, lays out a plan to erase coal emissions that includes  cutting fossil fuel subsidies, applying a substantial fee on carbon emissions,  developing a smart grid, increasing energy efficiency, some carbon capture and  storage, and, of course, replacing coal with clean energy alternatives and new  (hopefully safer) nuclear technologies.

 

 

Mail  Online (London, England: daily circulation 1.99  million)

“Surprise  superfoods: Forget blueberries. Dieticians say popcorn and pork scratchings are  bursting with nutrients - and could be GOOD for  you”

May 4,  2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press  release

 

 

There's no doubt broccoli,  watercress and acai berries are overflowing with healthy vitamins and minerals,  but what about the foods we actually want to eat? As a new study reveals that  the once-demonised egg should be regarded as a 'superfood' (it's packed with  vital antioxidants and nutrients), we uncover the other surprising wonderfoods  sitting right under our noses... Popcorn. The humble cinema snack could prevent  cancer and help dieters. A study presented last August to the American Chemical Society suggests the real  health benefits could lie more in its 'surprisingly large' polyphenol content,  antioxidants thought to mop up free radicals, the potentially damaging chemicals  that cause diseases such as cancer and heart disease.


San Diego  Union-Tribune (San  Diego, Calif.: daily  circulation 296,331)

“Wellnews:  Pollution, in vitro fertilization and the end of  recycling”

May 4,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

The production of supersoft toilet  paper (much favored by Americans) is becoming increasingly imperiled by a  growing shortage of high-quality used paper, according to a report in the  current edition of Chemical & Engineering  News. The rise of electronic communications and broad efforts to  reduce paper consumption have reduced the amount of used paper available for  recycling. Confounding things further is the fact that much of the paper now  used in offices is, itself, the product of recycling. As a result, C&EN  says, there’s less good-quality paper available for conversion into toilet paper  soft enough to satisfy picky consumers.

 

 

United  Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.7 million monthly unique  users)

“Nanoscience  may help cancer researchers”

May 3,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists say a U.S.  government project is making progress in finding ways to use nanotechnology to  improve diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cancer. Piotr Grodzinski and  colleagues at the National Cancer Institute's Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer say the  $145 million project is producing innovations that will radically improve care  for the disease. Grodzinski says the alliance builds on more than 50 years of  advances in cancer care that, although substantial, still leave cancer as the  No. 1 cause of death worldwide. The researchers, in an update of the status of  the program, describe a range of advances, including some showing significant  promise in clinical trials that would have a big impact on cancer. They promise  earlier disease diagnosis, highly targeted treatments that kill cancer cells but  leave normal cells alone, fewer side effects and improved survival. The report  appears in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

 

 

Medical  News Today (U.K.:  1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Drug Discovery  Process For Small Molecule Therapeutics Is The Focus Of ACS  Webinar”

May 3,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

 

Those interested in the chemical  sciences are invited to join the next in a series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars™,  focusing on professional growth and development. Scheduled for Thursday, May 6,  2 - 3 p.m. EDT, the free ACS Webinars™ will feature Ann Newman, Ph.D., of  Seventh Street Development Group, specializing in solid state and pharmaceutical  services consulting and training., speaking on "From a Beaker to a Bottle:  Overview of the Drug Discovery and Development Process for Small Molecule  Therapeutics."

 

 

New  York Times (New York, N.Y.: daily circulation  928,000)

“Why  So Blue?”

May 3,  2010

 

 

Q. Why do “Martha Stewart” chickens  produce blue and green eggs? A. Araucana chickens, made famous by the household  style expert Martha Stewart, produce a pigment called oocyanin, a byproduct of  bile production. Fanciers of the Araucana breed, which has roots in Chile,  say it penetrates the entire shell, because it is added early in the formation  of the egg. For most color-egged chickens, the pigment is added to the outer  layer of the shell as the egg passes through the oviduct on its way to being  laid, according to a 2006 article in Chemical  and Engineering News. Brown and mottled-brown eggs, more common color  patterns, come from a class of pigments called porphyrins that are produced by  the breakdown of red blood cells.

 

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen,  Va.: 1.5  million monthly unique users)

“Study offers recipe for global  warming-free industrial materials”

May 3,  2010

 

 

Let a bunch of fluorine atoms get  together in the molecules of a chemical compound, and they're like a heavy metal  band at a chamber music festival. They tend to dominate the proceedings and not  always for the better. That's particularly true where the global warming  potential of the chemicals is concerned, says a new study by NASA and Purdue University researchers. "What we're hoping  is that these additional requirements for minimizing global warming will be used  by industry as design constraints for making materials that have, perhaps, the  most green chemistry," says Joseph  Francisco, a Purdue chemistry and earth and atmospheric sciences  professor.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Daily  Health Bulletin

“Treatments  for Obesity Could Include Eating Seaweed”

May 4,  2010

 

It seems that seaweed, or more  precisely a fiber found in sea kelp, reduces the body’s fat uptake by more than  75%, beating most anti-obesity treatments out there. The highly encouraging  findings have been presented at the American  Chemical Society’s spring 2010 meeting in San Francisco, a conference  that brings over 17,000 scientists together and offers reports on the latest in  the fields of health, food, medicine and chemistry.

 

 

Cosmetic  Surgery Today

“Scientists  Report on the Skin Benefits of Soybean Oil”

May 3,  2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press  release

 

A recent report presented at the  239th National Meeting of the American  Chemical Society (ACS) showcased the development of a new method of  converting soybean oil into a bio-based sunscreen active ingredient that could  not only shield the skin from harmful UV rays, but also supports the skin cells.  Certain formulations of sunscreen contain ingredients that may be harmful to the  skin and health in the long-term, and some dermatologists recommend using only  chemical-free products, including organic sunscreen and skin protecting  agents.

 

Reuters (“viewed by more than 1 billion monthly”)

“Five minutes in the green can boost self esteem”

May 1, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) press release

 

 

[More than 100 media outlets, including MSNBC (New York, N.Y.: 39.9 million monthly unique users), Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 37.9 million monthly unique users), BBC News (London, England: 50 million monthly unique users), ABC News (New York, N.Y.: 12.2 million monthly unique users) and the National Post (Toronto, Ontario: daily circulation 203,781), also covered the story.]

 

 

Just five minutes of exercise a day in the great outdoors can improve mental health, according to a study released on Saturday, and policymakers should encourage more people to spend time in parks and gardens. "We believe that there would be a large potential benefit to individuals, society and to the costs of the health service if all groups of people were to self-medicate more with green exercise," Barton said in a statement about the study, which was published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Many studies have shown that outdoor exercise can reduce the risk of mental illness and improve a sense of well-being, but Jules Pretty and Jo Barton, who led this study, said that until now no one knew how much time needed to be spent on green exercise for the benefits to show. Barton and Pretty looked at data from 1,252 people of different ages, genders and mental health status taken from 10 existing studies in Britain. They analyzed activities such as walking, gardening, cycling, fishing, boating, horse-riding and farming. They found that the greatest health changes occurred in the young and the mentally ill, although people of all ages and social groups benefited. The largest positive effect on self-esteem came from a five-minute dose of "green exercise."

 

 

USA Today (McLean,  Va.: daily circulation 1.8 million)

“Developing world will soon produce more e-waste than developed nations”

April 30, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

[The Voice of America (Washington D.C.: weekly global audience 125 million) also covered the item.]

 

Developing countries will produce at least twice as much electronic waste, or e-waste, as developed countries by2030, reports a new study. Sales of electronics are growing rapidly worldwide as technological advances shrink the lifetime of consumer products, thus generating more e-waste, according to the study published this week in the American Chemical Society's semi-monthly journal Environmental Science & Technology. The study projects that by 2016-18, developing nations will discard more obsolete personal computers than developed regions and by 2030, they'll discard 400 million to 700 million of them each year, compared with 200 million to 300 million in developed countries. "The new structure of global e-waste generation ... calls for a serious reconsideration of e-waste policy," says the team of four scientists from Arizona State University and China's Nankai University in Tianjin.

 

 

National Geographic (Washington D.C.: monthly circulation 5.6 million)

“Shampoo, Cosmetics May Form Cancer-Causing Substance in Water Supplies”

April 29, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Your shampoo may seem harmless, but it could be contributing to the formation of a mysterious, cancer-causing substance, a new study says. New research reveals that common household products such as shampoo can interact with disinfectants at U.S. wastewater treatment plants to form a little-studied class of cancer-causing substances. These substances, called nitrosamines, can end up in drinking water, experts say… For example, if 80 percent of people in an area served by a treatment plant used a typical amount of Suave shampoo daily, that amount of shampoo would account for up to 3 percent of nitrosamines in the treated wastewater, the authors wrote. Dawn detergent created 26 times more NDMA than Suave, according to the study in the January 19 edition of the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

 

 

Associated Content (Denver, Colo.: 23.3 million monthly unique users)

“The Future is Here: Top American Companies for Innovation”

April 30, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

 

The United States has some of the most technologically advanced companies in the world. While technology doesn't necessarily mean innovation, many of the most forward-thinking companies in America do rely heavily on technology to sell their wares. Here are the best of the best for imaginative concepts not only as a business model but also for being leaders in their field… Goodyear has partnered with Danish firm Genencor to produce new tires. Within five years we could see tires on the road maid from biological materials instead of petroleum rubber. Called Bio-Isoprene, this type of rubber is made from biomass instead of synthetic materials. The American Chemical Society estimates it takes seven gallons of petroleum to make one tire. This process will take that number down to zero. When you consider how many millions of cars are on the road think how much oil this would save.

 

 

Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.7 million monthly unique users)

“U.S. Could Eliminate CO2 Emissions from Coal in 20 Years, Experts Say”

May 2, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

The United States could completely stop emissions of carbon dioxide from coal-fired electric power plants -- a crucial step for controlling global warming -- within 20 years by using technology that already exists or could be commercially available within a decade, according to a group of scientists, engineers, and architects. That's the conclusion of an article published online, along with a news article on the topic, in the American Chemical Society's semi-monthly journal Environmental Science & Technology (ES&T). Both are scheduled for the June 1 print edition of ES&T. Pushker Kharecha and colleagues -- from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, the Columbia University Earth Institute, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and 2030 Inc./Architecture 2030 -- say that the global climate change problem becomes manageable only if society deals quickly with emissions of carbon dioxide from burning coal in electric power plants. "The only practical way to preserve a planet resembling that of the Holocene (today's world) with reasonably stable shorelines and preservation of species, is to rapidly phase out coal emissions and prohibit emissions from unconventional fossil fuels such as oil shale and tar sands," they state.

 

 

Broadcast TV

 

 

KCBS-LA (Los Angeles, Calif.: daily audience 55,623)

“Benefits of getting outdoors”

May 3, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

 

[KMGH-DEN (Denver, Colo.) and KWTV-OKC (Oklahoma City, Okla.) also carried the news.]

 

An important new study published in the journal "Environmental Science & Technology" shows the benefits of getting outdoors, shows five minutes of physical activity outside can boost your mood and self-esteem. Researchers found exercising near water has a greater effect.

 

 

News 12 CT (Hartford, Conn.)

“Green tea can help fight off glaucoma, other eye problems”

May 1, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

A new study shows the health benefits go further than expected. The findings just came out in the "Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry." And what makes this unique is that it specifically shows green tea can help fight off glaucoma and other eye problems. This new study shows that those antioxidants make their way to eye tissue and help ward off eye diseases.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

ScienceBlog

“In the green of health: Just 5 minutes of 'green exercise' optimal for good mental health”

May 1, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

How much "green exercise" produces the greatest improvement in mood and sense of personal well-being? A new study in the American Chemical Society's semi-monthly journal Environmental Science & Technology has a surprising answer. The answer is likely to please people in a society with much to do but little time to do it: Just five minutes of exercise in a park, working in a backyard garden, on a nature trail, or other green space will benefit mental health.

 

 

Green News

“Gypsy moths kept off of eco products with hormones”

April 30, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Eco products do not mean that aggressive and invasive species must be left to thrive, as the recent American Chemical Society national meeting in San Francisco revealed. At the event, David R Lance, assistant director at the US Department of Agriculture's Center for Plant Health Science & Technology, looked at the history of the gypsy moth and the way that it has been tackled. The society's weekly news magazine, Chemical & Engineering News, reports how early attempts to prevent the spread of the damaging moth focused on lacing trees with poisons including lead arsenate.