Daily  Mail (London, England: daily circulation 1.99  million)

“New  super-strong painkiller developed from snail  spit”

July 29,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

Scientists have developed a new  pain-relief pill from a chemical used by sea snails to catch their prey. It was  found to be as effective as morphine for relieving the most severe forms of pain  but without the added risk of addiction. Marine cone snails produce saliva that  contains a deadly dose of peptide toxins to help the slow-moving creatures catch  prey. They inject passing victims with needle-like teeth that shoot out of their  mouths. Now researchers in Australia, led by David Craik of the University of Queensland, have developed a form of the  painkiller that can be taken orally. The modified chemical was found to reduce  severe pain in rats at a much lower dose than existing medications, according to  an article in Chemical & Engineering  News.

 

CNET  News (San Francisco, Calif.: 15 million monthly unique  users)

“Possible new fuel  sources: Urine, bad butter”

July 29,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Add urine and old butter to the list  of waste products that could be used to make fuel in the future. Researchers at  the U.K.'s Bristol Robotics Laboratory, a  collaborative University of Bristol/University of the West of England facility,  have been working on yet another project that could convert human urine into  power. But what about butter? The Journal of  Agricultural and Food Chemistry has published a study that says that  spoiled, surplus, or non-food grade butter is a good candidate as a "food  source" for biodiesel, a fuel that's expected to have a rising global demand in  the near future. Scientists at the USDA's Agricultural Research Service took a  quarter-ton of butter and converted it to a rough version of biodiesel. It  wasn't perfect, but when fortified with other types of biodiesel fuel or  purified further, they say, waste butter would make a suitable source of fuel in  the future.

 

MinnPost (Minneapolis, Minn.: 175,500 monthly unique  users)

“Speedy  train technology finds new food safety niche”

July 30,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Magnetic levitation technology is  the darling of mass transit: High-speed trains floating above magnetic tracks  can sweep passengers along smoothly at 300 miles per hour. Now, researchers have  discovered an entirely new application for the futuristic technology: food  quality control and safety. A team of chemists at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. has developed a palm-sized maglev  apparatus that can be used to determine densities of various substances, quickly  and accurately. “Density is a universal property of matter, everything has  density,” said Katherine Mirica, a chemist at Harvard and lead author on the new  study published in the Journal of  Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Density measurements can help  determine the sugar content of soft drinks, the fat content of peanut butter and  the alcohol content of wine. Existing techniques for taking such measurements  are often complicated, cumbersome and expensive, Mirica said.

 

NSF’s  Science360 News Service (Arlington, Va.: 88,400 monthly unique  users)

“Nanomaterials poised for big impact in  construction”

July 30,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Nanomaterials are poised for  widespread use in the construction industry, where they can offer significant  advantages for a variety of applications ranging from making more durable  concrete to self-cleaning windows. But widespread use in building materials  comes with potential environmental and health risks when those materials are  thrown away. Those are the conclusions of a new study published by Rice University engineering researchers this  month in ACS Nano. "The advantages  of using nanomaterials in construction are enormous," said study co-author Pedro  Alvarez, Rice's George R. Brown Professor and chair of the Department of Civil  and Environmental Engineering. "When you consider that 41 percent of all energy  use in the U.S. is consumed by commercial and residential buildings, the  potential benefits of energy-saving materials alone are vast. “But there are  reasonable concerns about unintended consequences as well," Alvarez said. "The  time for responsible lifecycle engineering of man-made nanomaterials in the  construction industry is now, before they are introduced in environmentally  relevant concentrations."

 

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, Pa.: daily circulation  213,352)

“North Student  News”

July 29,  2010

 

For many students in the northern  suburbs, the 2009-10 school year was one of added achievement. Here are just  some of their accomplishments in the school year gone by:  Nicholas Didycz, who  will enter his senior year at North  Hills Senior  High School, placed first in the Secondary School Chemistry  Contest, sponsored by the Pittsburgh section of the American Chemical Society among students from a three-state region. He earned top honors in the  second-year category. The contest was open to students from schools in  Pennsylvania, Ohio and West  Virginia.

 

Science  Daily (Rockville, Md.: 2.7 million monthly unique  users)

“Hexagonal  Boron Nitride Sheets May Help Graphene Supplant  Silicon”

July 29,  2010

 

What researchers might call "white  graphene" may be the perfect sidekick for the real thing as a new era unfolds in  nanoscale electronics. But single-atom-thick layers of hexagonal boron nitride  (h-BN), the material under intense study at Rice University's world-class Department of  Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, are likely to find some macro  applications as well. Researchers in the lab of Pulickel Ajayan, Rice's Benjamin  M. and Mary Greenwood Anderson Professor in Mechanical Engineering and Materials  Science and of chemistry, have figured out how to make sheets of h-BN, which  could turn out to be the complementary apple to graphene's orange. The results  were reported last week in the online journal Nano Letters.

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique  users)

“Nanotechnology's brightest  coming to Rice for Buckyball Discovery  Conference”

July 29,  2010

 

The biggest names in nanotechnology  are preparing to gather this fall at Rice University, and everyone is welcome to  join them. Registration is open for Year of Nano events to be held Oct. 10-13 in  honor of the 25th anniversary of the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the carbon  60 molecule, the buckminsterfullerene, at Rice. The Richard E. Smalley Institute  for Nanoscale Science and Technology, the world's first nanotechnology center  when it opened in 1991, will bring top scientists to Rice for the Buckyball  Discovery Conference, a three-day event that begins Oct. 11 and will take a  comprehensive look at the past, present and future of nanotechnology. The "Week  of Nano" will also feature a Bucky "Ball" Celebration at Rice on the evening of  Oct. 11. It will include the presentation of the National Historic Chemical Landmark designation, facility tours, nanotechnology demos and memorabilia, as well as  food and drinks. On Oct. 10, friends and fans of nano research at Rice will  celebrate at the 10-10-10 Gala.

 

… From the  Blogs

 

ScienceBlog

“Story tips from the Department  of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August  2010”

July 29,  2010

 

Ivaylo Ivanov of Georgia State University and colleagues used Jaguar, a  Cray XT high-performance computing system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to  elucidate the mechanism by which accessory proteins called sliding clamps are  loaded onto DNA strands and coordinate enzymes that enable gene repair or  replication. “This research has direct bearing on understanding the molecular  basis of genetic integrity and the loss of this integrity in cancer and  degenerative diseases,” says Ivanov, whose work appeared in a recent issue of  the Journal of the American Chemical  Society.

 

Conservation  Magazine

“Dead Zone  Entrée”

July 30,  2010

 

You already know your carbon  footprint. How about your “nitrogen footprint”? Researchers have calculated how  much nitrogen pollution is produced by the production of common foods. Topping  their dead zone menu was red meat, which generated the equivalent of more than  150 grams of nitrogen per kilogram of flesh. Next in line – with nitrogen  footprints of 50 to 100 grams — were dairy products, chicken and eggs and fish.  Cereals and carbohydrates had the lowest footprint, of just 2.6. Overall,  farming activities were responsible about 70% of the emissions in every food  group, the researchers report in a July 23 paper published online by Environmental Science &  Technology.

Popular  Science (New York, N.Y.: monthly circulation 1.3  million)

“Antibacterial  Graphene 'Paper' Could Lead to Better Bandages”

July 28,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

A new antibacterial paper could lead  to food wrappers that keep food fresh longer, shoes that never stink, and  bandages with a built-in ability to deter infection. It turns out a paper-like  material made of graphene – thin sheets of carbon just a single atom thick –  have antibacterial properties that could have vast applications. A team of  Chinese researchers was exploring new applications for graphene when they  decided to make a sheet of “paper” from graphene oxide. They tried to grow both  bacteria and human cells on the material and found that while the bacteria  couldn’t find a solid footing to colonize, the human cells were more or less  unaffected. As such, the paper could be used to make bandages that discourage  bacterial infection. It could also be used in live tissue storage, packaging of  food products, or integrated into textiles that don’t allow bacteria to breed.  (ACS  Nano)

 

Oneindia (Bangalore, India: 7.3 million monthly unique  users)

“Study  reveals pros, cons of nanotech-enhanced building materials'  use”

July 29,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Nanomaterials will soon find  effective use in the construction industry but widespread use in building  materials comes with potential environmental and health risks when those  materials are thrown away, according to new research. The study, by Rice University engineering researchers,  appears in ACS Nano. "The  advantages of using nanomaterials in construction are enormous. When you  consider that 41 percent of all energy use in the U.S. is consumed by commercial  and residential buildings, the potential benefits of energy-saving materials  alone are vast," said study co-author Pedro Alvarez, Rice's George R. Brown  Professor and chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.  "But there are reasonable concerns about unintended consequences as well. The  time for responsible lifecycle engineering of man-made nanomaterials in the  construction industry is now, before they are introduced in environmentally  relevant concentrations," he added.

 

Yahoo!  News (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 37.9 million monthly unique  users)

“Weapons  Buried at Sea: Big, Poorly Understood Problem”

July 28,  2010

 

In June, a clam boat happened upon  some old military munitions off the coast of Long Island, New York. Mustard gas,  released when the fishermen inadvertently hauled in the shells, blistered one  crew member and reminded government officials, scientists and the public of the  weapons arsenal that is buried deep below the surface of the world's oceans.  This arsenal includes ammunition, explosives and chemical weapons such as sulfur  mustard (mustard gas), arsenic, cyanide, lewisite (a gas that blisters the skin  and irritates the lungs) and sarin (now classified as a weapon of mass  destruction by the United Nations). The problem isn't going away anytime soon,  experts say, because the dangers are hard to measure and because safe ways to  remove and dispose of the weapons are lacking. Scientists are beginning to study  underwater munitions to determine whether they pose significant health and  environmental risks. For example, a team of European and Russian researchers  reported last month on a project to take samples in the Baltic Sea, where about 11,000 tons of toxic chemicals are  under water. After initial testing of seawater, sediment and marine life, they  wrote in the journal Environmental Science  & Technology "there are significant uncertainties."

 

The  Atlantic (Boston, Mass.:  monthly circulation 400,000)

“The  Dark Side of Sticky Notes”

July 28,  2010

 

The New York Times celebrates the  thirtieth anniversary of Post-It Notes, a great innovation of the late 1970s  national malaise, perhaps because it introduced a bit of sunny yellow into the  gloom of the stagflation-era workplace. It also illustrates how bold marketing  in difficult times, and user ingenuity, can complement each other: Notepads  produced for internal use at 3M were a hit, but when they were tested in four  markets in 1977, shoppers showed little interest. The next year the company  descended upon Boise,  Idaho, for what was known  internally as the Boise Blitz. Free samples were widely distributed to offices,  and so habit-forming was the product that more than 90 percent of Boiseans given  samples said they would buy it. I haven't found the original report online, but  there are further technical details here, and they've recently been confirmed by  Chemical and  Engineering News.

 

Science  Daily (Rockville, Md.: 2.7 million monthly unique  users)

“Middle  School Students Co-Author Research on Enzyme for Activating Promising  Disease-Fighters”

July 28,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Two middle school students from  Wisconsin  joined a team of scientists who are reporting the first glimpse of the innermost  structure of a key bacterial enzyme. It helps activate certain antibiotics and  anti-cancer agents so that those substances do their job. Their study appears in  ACS' weekly journal Biochemistry.  In the report, study leader Hazel Holden and colleagues note intense scientific  interest in a chemical process called methylation, which increases the activity  of DNA, proteins, and other substances in the body by transferring methyl (CH3)  groups to them. Special enzymes called methyltransferases make methylation  possible, and these proteins are very important in a myriad of key biological  processes. Holden and colleagues studied a bacterial methyltransferase involved  in the production of tetronitrose, a component of the promising anti-cancer  agent, tetrocarcin, and the antibiotic kijanimicin. The methyltransferase seems  to play a key role in activating these  disease-fighters.

 

United  Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.4 million monthly unique  users)

“Study:  Fungus could be weapon against BPA”

July 28,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Scientists say a fungus may provide  a safe, eco-friendly way to dispose of food container plastics, controversial  for their content of bisphenol A, or BPA. Manufacturers annually produce about  2.7 million tons of plastic containing BPA, which studies suggest may cause a  range of adverse health effects, an American  Chemical Society release said Wednesday. Pretreating plastics with  ultraviolet light and heat allowed the fungus to grow better than on untreated  plastic, and the fungi was able to use the BPA as a source of energy as it broke  down the plastic. In a 12-month test, there was almost no decomposition of  untreated plastic compared to substantial decomposition of the pretreated  plastic with no release of BPA, the ACS said.

 

Reuters (New York, N.Y.: “viewed by more than 1 billion  monthly”)

“GM to Use Less  Potent Greenhouse Gas to Keep Cars Cool”

July 28,  2010

 

General Motors plans to use a new  air conditioning refrigerant for its 2013 models that is a less potent  greenhouse gas than the current common refrigerant. The primary vehicle  refrigerant in use is HFC-134a, which is some 1,400 times more potent than  carbon dioxide (CO2) when it comes to global warming and is being banned by the  European Union. While HFC-134a stays in the atmosphere for more than 13 years,  the new refrigerant, HFO-1234yf, has an 11-day atmospheric life and a global  warming potential (GWP) of 4. The baseline for GWP is CO2, which has a GWP of 1.  In Europe, a wholesale switch to HFO-1234yf  seems inevitable, as Chemical &  Engineering News reports that the German Association of the  Automotive Industry has put its weight behind the new refrigerant even though in  2007 it stated it would switch to using CO2 for vehicle air conditioning. Moving  to CO2 would require new equipment for automakers, while going from HFC-134a to  HFO-1234yf would provide less hassle.

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique  users)

“'Smart' sand:  grain-sized nanotechnology electronic noses are on the  horizon”

July 28,  2010

 

Imagine a device the size of – and  nearly as cheap as – a grain of sand which is capable of analyzing the  environment around it, recognize its chemical composition, and report it to a  monitoring system. This is the concept of nanotechnology-based electronic noses  (e-nose) – miniature electronic devices which mimic the olfactory systems of  mammals and insects and which will lead to better, cheaper and smaller sensor  devices. "Our approach demonstrates the potential of combining bottom-up  nanowire fabrication protocols with state-of-the art microfabrication methods to  design prospective simple sensing arrays which, in principle, might be scaled  down to the size of few micrometers and thus become the smallest analytical  instrument," Andrei Kolmakov, an associate professor in the physics department  at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, tells Nanowerk. Kolmakov and a  team of researchers from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Rensselaer  Polytechnic Institute, Sincrotrone Trieste, and first author Victor V. Sysoev  from Saratov  State Technical University, have published their findings  in the July 20, 2010 online issue of ACS  Nano.

 

… From the  Briefs

 

Everyday  Simplicity

“Tea as a Stress Reducer - It  Works”

July 28,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Black tea has been studied in  Great  Britain, and found to be a proven stress  reducer.  Actually, it doesn't relax you so much as it prevents those nasty  stress hormones (like cortisol) from skyrocketing and it is also able to fight  against the formation of blood clots. Additionally, one research study published  in the Journal of Agricultural and Food  Chemistry found that chamomile tea heals inflammation along with  assorted skin diseases, open wounds/ulcers and even gout. WebMD also reports  that recent studies have found that simple little old chamomile tea can stunt  growing human cancer cells.

 

Science  Magazine News

“Growers Can Boost Benefits of  Broccoli and Tomatoes”

July 29,  2010

 

Agronomic practices can greatly  increase the cancer-preventive phytochemicals in broccoli and tomatoes. "We  enriched preharvest broccoli with different bioactive components, then assessed  the levels of cancer-fighting enzymes in rats that ate powders made from these  crops," said Elizabeth Jeffery, a U of I professor of food science and human  nutrition. The highest levels of detoxifying enzymes were found in rats that ate  selenium-treated broccoli. The amount of one of the cancer-fighting compounds in  broccoli was six times higher in selenium-enriched broccoli than in standard  broccoli powder, she said. The study was published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food  Chemistry.

Daily Telegraph (London, England: daily circulation 686,679)

“Gel for decayed teeth 'could spell end to fillings'”

July 28, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

A gel that can help decayed teeth grow back in weeks could signal an end to fillings. French scientists said the gel works by prompting cells in teeth to start multiplying. They claim that in laboratory studies it took just one month to restore teeth back to their original state. The French team mixed MSH with a chemical called poly-L-glutamic acid. The mixture was then turned into a gel and rubbed on to cells taken from extracted human teeth. In a separate experiment, the scientists applied the gel to the teeth of mice with dental cavities. In just one month, the cavities had disappeared. The gel is still undergoing testing but could be available for use within three to five years. Their findings are published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

 

The Medical News (Sydney, Australia: 441,800 monthly unique users)

“ACS names Chemistry Nobel Laureate as winner of 2011 Priestley Medal”

July 28, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

Ahmed H. Zewail, Ph.D., 1999 Chemistry Nobel Laureate and Linus Pauling Professor of Chemistry & Professor of Physics at the California Institute of Technology, has been named winner of the 2011 Priestley Medal by the American Chemical Society (ACS). The award recognizes Zewail's revolutionary methods for developing "ultraslow-motion" imaging for the study of ultrafast processes in chemistry, biology and materials science. His work is providing deep new insights into materials behavior and biological processes that determine health and disease. The annual award, the highest honor bestowed by ACS, consists of a gold medallion designed to commemorate the work of Joseph Priestley as well as a presentation box and a certificate.

 

The Guardian (London, England: daily circulation 283,063)

“Sparks fly over study suggesting wildfires cut CO2”

July 29, 2010

 

Call it a hot topic. A study suggesting that intentional forest blazes could significantly cut carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from wildfires in the Western United States has prompted a piquant scholarly quarrel. The exchange highlights the challenge forest managers may face in balancing plans to use fire to restore forest ecosystems with efforts to curb carbon emissions. Forests have emerged as a key player in climate change because trees can suck huge amounts of CO2 out of the atmosphere and "sequester" the carbon for decades. Christine Wiedinmyer of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado and Matthew Hurteau Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Arizona, estimated how much CO2 had been released by wildfires in the western U.S. from 2001 to 2008. Then, they estimated what the total might have been if the wildfires had been replaced by cooler, more controlled prescribed burns. The result, they reported in the 11 February online issue of Environmental Science & Technology (ES&T), is that the planned fires might have cut CO2 emissions by 18% to 25% in the western U.S., and by as much as 60% in specific forest types.

 

Environmental Protection Magazine (Dallas, Tex.)

“Lake Trout Seem to Have More Mercury Now, Study Says”

July 28, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Mercury levels in a popular species of game fish in Lake Erie are increasing after two decades of steady decline, scientists are reporting. The study, the most comprehensive to date on mercury levels in Great Lakes fish, is in Environmental Science & Technology, a semi-monthly journal. Satyendra Bhavsar, Ph.D., from the Ontario Ministry of the Environment, and colleagues note that the Great Lakes is the largest group of freshwater lakes in the world. The lakes are of significant economic importance to the United States and Canada due to the area’s $7 billion fishing industry. The scientists studied mercury levels in 5,807 fish samples collected from the lakes between the 1970s and 2007. The samples included lake trout and walleye, two of the most common species of game fish caught in the region. The researchers found that mercury levels in the fish steadily declined from the mid-1970s to 2007 in the upper Great Lakes (Superior and Huron).

 

South Florida Sun-Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.: daily circulation 226,591)

“What is Green Exercise?”

July 27, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

Trying to decide on an activity to keep yourself healthy this summer? Try green exercise. Green exercise refers to physical activity that is done while simultaneously being exposed to nature. Various forms of green exercise include hiking, biking, outdoor sports or beach activities. The University of Essex in the United Kingdom has been studying the health benefits of green exercise for more than five years and has published a recent paper on this topic. This study has been published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, and shows that as little as five minutes of green exercise improves both mood and self-esteem.

 

Technology Review (Cambridge, Mass.: bi-monthly circulation 315,000)

“A Boost for Battery Life and Capacity”

July 28, 2010

 

A new chemical trick for making nanostructured materials could help increase the range and reliability of electric cars and lead to better batteries that could help stabilize the power grid. Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA, have developed the technique, which can turn a potential electrode material that cannot normally store electricity into one that stores more energy than similar battery materials already on the market. In work published in the journal Nano Letters, the PNNL researchers show that paraffin wax and oleic acid encourages the growth of platelike nanostructures of lithium-manganese phosphate. These "nanoplates" are small and thin, allowing electrons and ions (atoms or molecules with a positive or negative charge) to move in and out of them easily. This turns the material--which ordinarily doesn't work as a battery material because of its very poor conductivity--into one that stores large amounts of electricity.

 

Medical News Today (U.K.: 1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Humble Protein, Nanoparticles Tag-Team To Kill Cancer Cells”

July 28, 2010

 

A normally benign protein found in the human body appears to be able when paired with nanoparticles to zero in on and kill certain cancer cells, without having to also load those particles with chemotherapy drugs. The finding could lead to a new strategy for targeted cancer therapies, according to the University of North Carolina at Chapel  Hill scientists who made the discovery. The discovery was made by a team of researchers led by Joseph DeSimone, Ph.D., Chancellor's Eminent Professor of Chemistry in UNC's College of Arts and Sciences and William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State  University, along with Jin Wang, Ph.D., and Shaomin Tian, Ph.D., in DeSimone's lab. Their findings appear in this week's online issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Science Magazine News

“Nano Parfait a Treat for Scientists: Researchers Spin Pure Batches of Nanotubes Species”

July 27, 2010

 

One team, led by Rice Professor Junichiro Kono and graduate students Erik Haroz and William Rice, has made a small but significant step toward the dream of an efficient nationwide electrical grid that depends on highly conductive quantum nanowire. Kono's lab reported its results recently in the online edition of ACS Nano. Kono is a professor in electrical and computer engineering and professor of physics and astronomy.

 

Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence

“Electroshocking Fish: In-Seine? No. Safe, Educational? Yes”

July 27, 2010

 

Olcott, or Olcott Beach as the locals in this lakeside Niagara County hamlet refer to it, is home to the deepest harbor on Lake Ontario west of Rochester… In a two-year NYSG-funded study that wrapped up late last year, University at Buffalo investigator Joe Atkinson and his team created a web-based tool that allows scientists and managers to plot a resource shed for Lake Ontario or Lake Erie at any location of interest. After undergoing testing off-and-on for about a year, Atkinson said, “This tool will be able to plot resource sheds not only for the long-term average hydrodynamic conditions originally proposed but also for a set of historic conditions, for years since about 2000.” His team’s findings were published earlier this year in an Environmental Science and Technology journal article.

Daily Mail (London, England: daily circulation 2 million)

“Gel that can help decayed teeth grow back could end fillings”

July 26, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

A gel that can help decayed teeth grow back in just weeks may mean an end to fillings. The gel, which is being developed by scientists in France, works by prompting cells in teeth to start multiplying. They then form healthy new tooth tissue that gradually replaces what has been lost to decay. Researchers say in lab studies it took just four weeks to restore teeth back to their original healthy state. The gel contains melanocyte-stimulating hormone, or MSH. Their findings, published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano, could signal hurtnot just an end to fillings, but the dreaded dentist drill as well. Tooth decay is a major public health problem in Britain. Around £45m a year is spent treating decayed teeth and by the age of 15, teenagers have had an average of 2.5 teeth filled or removed.

 

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000)

“American Chemical Society, Royal Society of Chemistry jointly launch sustainability websites”

July 26, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

Two of the world's largest scientific societies today unveiled new Web sites showcasing information intended to help the general public better understand how the science of chemistry can help solve global challenges such as global climate change, abundant food, safe drinking water, new energy sources, and medical breakthroughs looming in the 21st Century. The American Chemical Society (ACS) and the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) both launched Web sites that mirror each others content. The ACS Web site — www.acs.org/acsrscalliance — seeks to shine a spotlight on efforts to develop sustainable energy, provide abundant food and water, maintain environmental equilibrium and solve other emerging global challenges caused by unprecedented worldwide population growth and shrinking availability of resources needed to sustain life as we know it. This comprehensive online guide features links to ACS and RSC resources on creating renewable fuels, fostering safe and sustainable agriculture, combating emerging diseases, confronting climate change, ensuring clean air and water, and promoting a "greener" lifestyle.

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.3 million monthly unique users)

“Special news media briefing and reception during American Chemical Society national meeting”

July 26, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

What's a baseball game or a football game or a rock concert without a smorgasbord of food and beverages? Today's stadiums offer a staggering array of food from appetizers to desserts. But three staples still bring out the crowds: hot dogs, popcorn and beer. A special news media briefing and reception will focus on that topic during the American Chemical Society (ACS) 240th National Meeting & Exposition, which be held here from Aug. 22-26. The event will feature two world-renowned food chemists -- Sara J. Risch, Ph.D., and Shirley Corriher. Their topic: The Chemistry of Stadium Foods. Hosted by the ACS Office of Public Affairs, the event will begin at 5:30 p.m. on Aug. 23 at Jerry Remy's Sports Bar and Grill, 1265 Boylston St., next to Fenway Park. Remy is the popular announcer for the Boston Red Sox. More than 8,000 reports on new advances in medicine, health, energy, environment, and other scientific disciplines that involve chemistry will be presented during the ACS National Meeting.

 

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 10.8 million monthly unique users)

“Karen Lackey Named Vice President and Head of Medicinal Chemistry at Roche”

July 26, 2010

 

Roche announced today that Karen Lackey has been named Vice President and Head of Medicinal Chemistry, effective immediately. In her role at the company's Nutley facility, Karen will be responsible for small molecule drug discovery in oncology, virology and inflammation. She will also oversee the Nutley Discovery Chemistry Management Team and be a member of the Global Chemistry Leadership Team. Karen will report to Hans-Joachim Boehm, Ph.D., Global Head of Chemistry at Roche. During her 22-year career at GlaxoSmithKline, Karen held a variety of positions. Most importantly, she played an active role in the discovery of the dual erbB2/EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lapatinib, which is currently marketed as Tykerb®.  In recognition of this important discovery, Karen received the "Heroes of Chemistry" award from the American Chemical Society in 2008.

 

FOX News (New York, N.Y.: 12.7 million monthly unique users)

“Experts Question Safety of Dietary Supplements”

July 26, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Botanical supplements, often called herbal remedies, are poorly understood and in many cases could be dangerous, experts say. Likewise, even common vitamins like C and E often don't work as billed and can be bad for many people. Beyond the U.S. obsession with finding miracle pills to improve health and extend life, the problem with herbal supplements is two-fold, according to an article published in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News, a publication of the American Chemical Society. The article states: Many plant-based supplements have not been studied, so scientists don't even know what's really in them. Due to lack of regulation, many people may simply take way too much of what might otherwise be a good or benign thing. Among the things that need to be done to safeguard the public, according to the new American Chemical Society analysis: Study the toxicity and the effectiveness of the various dietary supplements, as is done in the conventional drug industry. Concerns go beyond mere efficacy and safety. Taking a botanical supplement every day could induce or inhibit the activity of liver enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of certain medications, van Breemen said in the ACS article.

 

Las Vegas Review-Journal (Las Vegas, Nev.: daily circulation 172,366)

“Lifestyle changes: Tips for managing diabetes”

July 27, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

By the year 2025, it is estimated that approximately 380 million individuals worldwide will be affected by type 2 diabetes, according to the Archives of Internal Medicine. With this world-wide exposure, the chances that you, a family member or someone you know will be affected by type 2 diabetes are considerable. Therefore, it behooves all of us to understand at least a little about this disease and how we can reduce the likelihood that it will bring misery to us and our families. Several recent studies report new evidence that drinking coffee may help prevent diabetes and that caffeine may be the ingredient largely responsible for this effect. According to a new study in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, drinking coffee -- and lots of it -- may help prevent Type 2 Diabetes. It's due to the caffeine, claim the scientists from Nagoya University in Japan. Their findings, among the first animal studies to demonstrate this apparent link, appear in the June issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

 

Hartford Courant (Hartford, Conn.: daily circulation 155,540)

“Chili Pepper May Fight Fat: Spicy, And Slimming”

July 26, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Besides adding a little kick to your food, chili pepper might serve another purpose: fighting fat. Capsaicin, the chemical that gives chili its heat, has long been suspected as being linked to fat reductions, but it's been a mystery as to how. Researchers at Daegu University in Korea say their new study sheds some light on the matter. Results of the study were published in the Journal of Proteome Research. The researchers fed high-fat diets to lab rats. One group of rats also were fed capsaicin and showed an average weight loss of 8 percent. Those rats also showed changes in 20 key proteins that work to break down fat.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Inhabitat (395,800 monthly unique users)

“Organoclays Could Create Next-Gen Eco Plastics”

July 26, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Clay: it’s good for more than just pottery. A report in the American Chemical Society’s Macromolecules journal claims that natural clay could be used to produce a cheap, flame-retardant substance that might one day replace the main compound used in plastic nanocomposites. Eco-friendly superplastics could, in other words, soon be on their way.

 

Tonic (80,700 monthly unique users)

“Two-Step Solar Tech Could Make Fuel While Scrubbing Atmosphere Clean”

July 26, 2010

 

It seems too good, but research demonstrates it's true: a solar technology could reverse carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere while turning that captured carbon into fuel. The discovery and its eyebrow-raising promise arise through a collaboration between scientists at George Washington and Howard Universities, both in Washington D.C. The process which is named Solar Thermal Electrochemical Photo (STEP) carbon capture was first proposed by the research team as theoretically feasible, and with the publication of findings in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, the viability of the technology has been successfully demonstrated.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 37.9 million monthly unique users)

“Experts Question Safety of Dietary Supplements”

July 24, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

Beyond the U.S. obsession with finding miracle pills to improve health and extend life, the problem with herbal supplements is two-fold, according to an article published in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News, a publication of the American Chemical Society. The article states: Many plant-based supplements have not been studied, so scientists don't even know what's really in them. Due to lack of regulation, many people may simply take way too much of what might otherwise be a good or benign thing. As far back as 2006, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reported that many Americans get too many nutrients because of the supplemental pills they pop. More recently, several studies have cast doubt on the value of vitamins: Research in 2008 found that vitamin C reduces the effectiveness of chemotherapy for cancer patients. Another study concluded that vitamins E and C, together or alone, did nothing to prevent any type of cancer over the course of 10 years.

 

United Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.4 million monthly unique users)

“Chili pepper ingredient may fight fat”

July 26, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Researchers in South Korea say chili peppers contain an ingredient -- capsaicin -- that may cause weight loss and fight fat. Jong Won Yun and colleagues at Daegu University in South Korea say laboratory studies suggest capaicin, which produces the "hot" in hot peppers, triggers proteins that help fight obesity by decreasing calorie intake, shrinking fat tissue and lowering fat levels in the blood. However, they say, it is not known exactly how capsaicin might trigger such beneficial effects. The report, published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Proteome Research, reports capsaicin-treated rats lost 8 percent of their body weight and showed changes in levels of at least 20 key proteins found in fat.

 

Discover Magazine (New York, N.Y.: monthly circulation 850,000)

“Using Urine to Make the Garden Grow”

July 23, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

They were perfectly lovely, the beets Surendra Pradhan and Helvi Heinonen-Tanski grew: round and hefty, a rich burgundy, their flavor sweet and faintly earthy like the dirt from which they came. Unless someone told you, you’d never know the beets were grown with human urine. Pradhan and Heinonen-Tanski, environmental scientists at the University of Kuopio in Finland, grew the beets as an experiment in sustainable fertilization. They nourished them with a combination of urine and wood ash, which they found worked as well as traditional mineral fertilizer. Heinonen-Tanski’s group planted four plots of beets and treated one with mineral fertilizer, one with urine and wood ash, one with urine alone, and one with no fertilizer as a control. After 84 days, about 280 beets were harvested. The beetroots from the urine- and urine-and-ash-fertilized plants were found to be, respectively, 10 percent and 27 percent larger by mass than those grown in mineral fertilizer. By grinding some beets to powder and subjecting them to chemical analysis, the researchers determined that all the beets had comparable nutrient contents—and according to a blind taste-testing panel, the taste was indistinguishable. The results are published in the February 10 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

 

Science News (Washington D.C.: bi-weekly circulation 125,000)

“Coffee perks up memory and balance in geriatric animals”

July 22, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Millions of Americans start their day with a cup of coffee and then reach for refills when their energy or attention flags. But new research in rats suggests that for the aging brain, coffee may serve as more than a mere stimulant. It can boost memory and the signaling essential to motor coordination. But the rub: If the same effects hold for humans, downing a morning cup or two just won’t cut it. The new data, presented July 20 at the Institute of Food   Technologists annual meeting, showed that among elderly rats, the best results emerged after months of downing the human equivalent of 10 cups per day. At the IFT meeting, YiFang Chu of Kraft in Glenview, Ill., described data from an Oct. 28, 2009, paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. It showed that roasting appears to not only increase the availability of coffee’s polyphenols to brain cells (at least to cells growing in a dish), but also the ability of these coffee constituents to protect those cells from oxidative damage. The coffee molecules appear to calm the cells so that they don’t become overstimulated by stess (like oxidation), Shukitt-Hale says.

 

Softpedia (Bellevue, Wash.: 3.5 million monthly unique visitors)
“Innovation Makes Graphene Production 'Greener’”

July 24, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

A group of investigators from the Rice  University announces the development of a new method for producing bulk amounts graphene oxide (GO). The approach can also be used to break up large quantities of the compound, which means that the team essentially developed a new means of ensuring a steady supply of the stuff. Graphene is a carbon compound featuring a honeycomb-like structure, and unique physical and chemical properties…There is a high chance that the microchips of tomorrow will not be based on silicon, like they are today, but on this new material….The work was published online this week in the esteemed scientific journal ACS Nano.

 

Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 2.6 million monthly unique users)

“Graphene Organic Photovoltaics: Flexible Material Only a Few Atoms Thick May Offer Cheap Solar Power”

July 24, 2010

 

A University of Southern California team has produced flexible transparent carbon atom films that the researchers say have great potential for a new breed of solar cells. "Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have been proposed as a means to achieve low cost energy due to their ease of manufacture, light weight, and compatibility with flexible substrates," wrote Chongwu Zhou, a professor of electrical engineering in the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, in a paper recently published in the journal ACS Nano. The technique described in the article describes progress toward a novel OPV cell design that has significant advantages, particularly in the area of physical flexibility.

 

United Press InternationaI (Washington  D.C.: 1.4 million monthly unique users)

Lack of zinc linked to diabetes”

July 23, 2010

 

A U.S. researcher says zinc may play a role in blood sugar regulation and in avoiding type 2 diabetes. Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy of the University  of Michigan suggests in type 2 diabetes -- a protein called amylin forms dense clumps that shut down insulin-producing cells. However, in the presence of zinc, amylin does not form clumps…The research, published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, suggests zinc prevents amylin -- also known as Islet Amyloid Polypeptide -- from forming harmful clumps.

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.3 million monthly unique users)

“Clean Genes: Chemists Cull the Good Synthetic DNA from the Bad”

July 23, 2010

 

Birds do it, bees do it. Even scientists in labs do it. But the scientists can't hold a candle to the birds and the bees, who can make gobs of primo DNA without even thinking about it. Isolating perfect DNA sequences is very expensive, so expensive that some clinical trials for gene therapy drugs have been put on hold for lack of funding. A discovery by Shiyue Fang, an assistant professor of chemistry at Michigan  Technological University, could change that. “Our method can provide high-quality, pure synthetic DNA by the kilogram at a much lower cost,” he says. It could also be used to purify RNA and other biological molecules such as peptides that have potential as pharmaceuticals. Fang’s work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and published in the American Chemical Society Journal -- Organic Letters as a rapid communication.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Newstrack India

Gulf oil dispersants don't seem to disrupt marine life, say scientists

July 22, 2010

Origin: OPA news release

 

Scientists have claimed that eight of the most commonly used oil dispersants used to fight oil spills appear unlikely to act as endocrine disruptors - hormone-like substances that can interfere with reproduction, development, and other biological processes. The tested dispersants also have relatively and the National Institutes of Health Chemical Genomics Center. In their study, Richard Judson and colleagues found that none of the substances showed significant endocrine disruption activity and cytotoxicity until they were tested at concentrations above 10 parts per million. However, they note that, "there are other routes by which chemicals can cause endocrine disruption, as well as other types of toxicity that have not been tested for here." Their findings appear in ACS' semi-monthly journal Environmental Science & Technology.

 

Today’s Healthy News

Better Bandages, Food Packaging, Fresher Foods, Thanks To New Antibacterial Material
July 23, 2010
Origin: OPA PressPac

A new form of paper with the built-in ability to fight disease-causing bacteria could have applications that range from anti-bacterial bandages to food packaging that keeps food fresher longer to shoes that ward off foot odor. A report about the new material, which consists of the thinnest possible sheets of carbon, appears in ACS Nano, a monthly journal…

 

 

July 22, 2010

 

USA Today (McLean,  Va.: daily circulation 1.8 million)

“Study: Dispersants don't seem to disrupt marine life”

July 22, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

Dispersants used to battle the Gulf oil spill don't appear to interfere with reproduction, development and other biological processes in marine life, concludes a study by the Environmental Protection Agency reported Wednesday. The possibility of hormonal changes to marine life has been a major concern about the more than 1.8 million gallons of dispersants used in the Gulf oil cleanup effort. In the study, reported in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, none of the eight dispersants tested displayed "biologically significant endocrine activity." The dispersant used in the Gulf, Corexit 9500, was found not to affect either the estrogen or androgen receptors used in the tests. Estrogen and androgen are female and male sex hormones, and when their normal signaling is disrupted, an animal's health, development or ability to reproduce can be affected. The biggest concern has been about a class of chemicals used to break up blobs of oil into millions of smaller droplets. These chemicals, called nonylphenol ethoxylates, can break down into nonylphenol, which can disrupt normal hormonal activity.

 

 

CNET News (San Francisco, Calif.: 15 million monthly unique users)

“Fighting foot fungus one nano-sheet at a time”

July 21, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

Researchers in Shanghai have engineered super-thin sheets of graphene oxide paper that could be used as antibacterial material in shoes, bandages, and food packaging. That's right. We mortal humans have discovered a kind of material that actually fights disease-causing bacteria, thereby opening a door into an unknown world of freakishly fresh food and feet. As Chunhai Fan, Qing Huang, and colleagues at the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics explain in their report in the monthly journal ACS Nano, graphene is a material first discovered in 2004 by the Russian physicist Andre Geim (also responsible for the development of gecko tape). Many have since tested it for a wide range of possible commercial uses, including in solar cells, computer chips, and sensors. Fan and Huang describe graphene as a "monolayer of tightly packed carbon atoms that possess many interesting properties," one of which turns out to be its effect on living cells.

 

 

Times of India (New Delhi,  India: daily circulation 3.15 million)

“Chili pepper ingredient helps fight obesity”

July 22, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

If you love chili peppers, you are in luck – as new research suggests it has an ingredient that helps fight fat. The study conducted by Jong Won Yun and colleagues revealed that chili peppers contain Capsaicin, which triggers certain beneficial protein changes in the body, causing weight loss. It decreases calorie intake, shrinking fat tissue, and lowering fat levels in the blood. The study results showed an 8 per cent weight loss in capsaicin-treated lab rats. They also showed changes in levels of at least 20 key proteins found in fat. The study appears in ACS’ monthly Journal of Proteome Research.

 

 

LiveScience (New York, N.Y.: 1.8 million monthly unique users)

“Experts Question Safety of Dietary Supplements”

July 21, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Millions of Americans swear by the health benefits of plant-based dietary supplements and other remedies billed as natural and often purported to have amazing results. Some $34 billion is spent annually on alternative medicine, including supplements. But botanical supplements, often called herbal remedies, are poorly understood and in many cases could be dangerous, experts say. Likewise, even common vitamins like C and E often don't work as billed and can be bad for many people. Beyond the U.S. obsession with finding miracle pills to improve health and extend life, the problem with herbal supplements is two-fold, according to an article published in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News, a publication of the American Chemical Society. The article states: Many plant-based supplements have not been studied, so scientists don't even know what's really in them. Due to lack of regulation, many people may simply take way too much of what might otherwise be a good or benign thing. "Right now, we do not even understand the chemical composition" of botanicals, said Ikhlas A. Khan, a professor of pharmacognosy at the University  of Mississippi. "Inherent variability blurs the composition."

 

 

Nature (London, England: 769,500 monthly unique users)

“Champagne fizzles out if served with a splash”

July 21, 2010

 

 

If you want to enjoy champagne to the full, pour it out as you would a beer. Sommeliers and connoisseurs may find the suggestion hard to swallow, but the evidence published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry seems irrefutable. Pouring champagne into a tilted glass helps it to retain the dissolved gas that is vital for the gustatory experience, say Gérard Liger-Belair and his colleagues at the University of Reims in France. The French team compared the amount of dissolved carbon dioxide in a fresh flute of champagne poured the traditional way — splashing it into a vertical glass — with that after pouring along the inside of a tilted glass, as one does with beer to avoid giving it too much frothy 'head'. The researchers found that champagne served chilled (at 4 °C) contains about twice as much dissolved CO2 using the beer-like method.

 

 

Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 2.7 million monthly unique users)

“Engineering Researchers Simplify Process to Make World's Tiniest Wires”

July 21, 2010

 

 

Surface tension isn't a very powerful force, but it matters for small things -- water bugs, paint, and, it turns out, nanowires. Nanowires are so tiny that a human hair would dwarf them -- some have diameters 150 billionths of a meter. Because of their small size, surface tension that occurs during the manufacturing process pulls them together, limiting their usefulness. This is a problem because the wires are seen as a potential core element of new and more powerful microelectronics, solar cells, batteries and medical tools. But in a paper in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces now online, a University of Florida engineering researcher says he has found an inexpensive solution. Ziegler and Justin Hill, who will graduate from UF with a doctorate in chemical engineering this summer, realized that they needed to introduce a force that counteracted that of the surface tension. They came up with a process simple enough to be achievable with a nine-volt battery. The researchers apply an electrical charge to the nanostructures during the manufacturing process, charging each tiny wire and making it repel its neighbor.

 

 

Ambler Gazette (Ambler, Pa.: weekly circulation 6,950)

“Young scientists get hands-on experience at Camp Invention”

July 21, 2010

 

 

Growing up, children are always told never to break anything around the house. That rule doesn't apply at Camp Invention. In fact, breaking household objects is encouraged. The 36 campers spent last week getting to the root of scientific questions, even if it meant shattering a few old appliances along the way. Dow Chemical hosted its annual Camp Invention for students in grades four to six at Mattison Avenue  Elementary School in Ambler from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 12 to 16. Started in 1990, the camp has spread across the country, and there was even one in Singapore last year. The camp has been held in Ambler for the past few years thanks to a local Dow chemist. Ambler resident Catherine Hunt began working at Rohm & Haas, now Dow Chemical, 25 years ago, and she is currently director of technology collaboration development at the company's Spring House facility. In 2007, Hunt became the president of the American Chemical Society, and one of her main goals as president was to increase science education.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

ScienceBlog

“Research links recreational pool disinfectants to health problems”

July 21, 2010

 

Splashing around in a swimming pool on a hot summer day may not be as safe as you think. A recent University  of Illinois study links the application of disinfectants in recreational pools to previously published adverse health outcomes such as asthma and bladder cancer. “All sources of water possess organic matter that comes from decaying leaves, microbes and other dead life forms,” said Michael Plewa, U of I professor of genetics. “In addition to organic matter and disinfectants, pool waters contain sweat, hair, skin, urine, and consumer products such as cosmetics and sunscreens from swimmers. ”This research was published in Environmental Science & Technology and supported by grants from the National Science Foundation.

 

 

Healthy Living

“Garlic and onion may boost mineral absorption”

July 21, 2010

 

 

Onions and garlic have been used as spices in cooking for thousands of years all over the world. Recent research reports that compounds in both onion and garlic increase the bio availability of iron and zinc from cereals seven-fold. Iron deficiency is reported to affect about a third of the global population, with two billion people anemic around the world. In addition, zinc deficiency affects 30% of the world’s population. Researchers studied two cereals—rice and sorghum; and two pulses—whole green gram and chickpea. They added garlic and onion to cereals and pulses, and found that iron uptake increased by 70% and zinc uptake rose by up to 160%.  High sulfur content in garlic and onion was shown to boost iron and Zinc in lab animals. The results of the study were published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

 

 

 

 

Toronto Star (Toronto, Ontario: daily circulation 314,173)

“New emission rules fuel rethink for cruise lines”

July 21, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

 

Some cruise lines are reconsidering voyages to Canada as they brace for tighter emission regulations on the horizon, but one industry expert says they would be unwise to pull out of one of their largest markets. As of 2012, all ships within 370 kilometres of North American shores will be required to use fuel with no more than one per cent sulphur content. In 2015, that maximum will fall to 0.1 per cent. The average sulphur content in fuel used by cruise ships is about 2.5 per cent, with the global limit at 4.5 per cent. Ross Klein, a professor at Newfoundland and Labrador’s Memorial  University who has researched the cruise industry, says companies will have virtually no choice but to comply with the new emission limits. “If Canada and the U.S. refuse to back off, is the industry really going to give up 95 per cent of its market and go someplace else?” Klein said… A 2007 study, published in the Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, found that up to 60,000 deaths are caused each year by shipping emissions. It also found that these deaths could increase by 40 per cent by 2012, due to steady growth in shipping traffic worldwide.

 

 

St. Louis Post-Dispatch (St. Louis, Mo.: daily circulation 240,796)

“High school student gets chance to work in chem lab”

July 21, 2010

 

 

Gabriel Hernandez couldn't imagine going into a chemistry-related field. The thought of science in general didn't even interest him. Then he did well in a high school junior biology class and got an offer to participate in a chemistry program called Project SEED, created by the American Chemical Society to encourage economically disadvantaged students to study chemistry. He would be paid to work 40 hours a week in a chem lab at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. He hadn't done very well in high school chemistry and didn't know what to expect. But he needed money for a car, and he thought the program might look good on a college resume. Hernandez, 18, of St. Louis, didn't expect that the program would change his outlook on science and his future goals. Now, in his second summer of the program, he's planning to take three chemistry classes his first semester at Simpson College in Iowa and hopes one day to work on curing cancer. "I really fell in love with science," Hernandez said in his white smock with red and brown stains on the front surrounded by containers of chemicals. "I knew nothing about chemical reactions when I came here; now I am doing stuff I probably wouldn't get the chance to do until grad school." All around the country, hundreds of students like Hernandez are participating in the two-month program sponsored by dozens of universities and the American Chemical Society.

 

 

The Medical News (Sydney, Australia: 431,000 monthly unique users)

“ACS to hold symposium on Deepwater Horizon oil spill”

July 21, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

 

The American Chemical Society (ACS) will hold a special day-long symposium on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on Tuesday, Aug. 24 during its National Meeting & Exposition. The symposium, which includes almost a dozen experts, will examine topics ranging from the spill's effects on marine life to its effects on the safety of seafood. It will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Room 210C of the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, followed by an open-discussion session from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. "The goal of the symposium is to gather people with different skills and backgrounds, including leaders in the field of oil spill chemistry, in an effort to study the oil spill and hopefully find out how to turn it around," explained co-organizer Kermit Murray, Ph.D. He is a professor of chemistry at Louisiana State University (LSU). "The oil spill is a cross-disciplinary problem in which chemistry plays a key role in finding solutions."

 

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.3 million monthly unique users)

“The World's Smallest Cup of Water: Team Shows Location of Water Relative to Prototypical Protein”

July 20, 2010

 

By combining theoretical and experimental expertise in the United States, Japan, and France, a team of scientists determined that a water molecule (guest) is cradled inside a functional molecule (host), turning it into the world's smallest cup of water. The location of a guest makes a difference in the host's behavior and function. The study also cautioned about some commonly used low-scaling methods that are widely used to model those systems in aqueous environments. This research was performed by scientists from Hiroshima University, the Universite Paris-Sud 11, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This work was featured in the Benoît Soep Festschrift special issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A. To begin, the researchers selected calix[4]arene, a functional molecule that often stands in for proteins. It was chosen because researchers can easily study different bonding scenarios and their influence on the molecule's function and selectivity in aqueous environments.

 

 

American Veterinary Medical Association (Schaumburg, Ill.: 88,100 monthly unique users)

“JAAHA's print revival receives positive feedback”

July 20, 2010

 

 

Despite six years as an online-only publication, the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association plans to return to print in January 2011, according to AAHA Associate Public Relations Manager Jason Merrihew. JAAHA went digital in 2004 as a result of surveys showing that members wanted an online edition. The surveys found that veterinarians liked to pick and choose the articles they read and that few read the print journal cover to cover. The online journal was structured to allow for easier search capabilities so members could find and review articles quickly. Subsequent surveys reflected a desire to return to print, hence the planned release of a print version of JAAHA in 2011. "We have received a lot of feedback from our members requesting a printed JAAHA," Merrihew said. "Although the main channel of JAAHA distribution will remain online, (having) the printed version will allow members more flexibility in the way they read the journal." The "best of both worlds" approach seems to be the trend in publications, according to the Association Media and Publishing's May/June 2010 issue of Signature magazine. Many associations, including the American Association of Bovine Practitioners and the American Chemical Society, have had increasingly positive responses to their online content.

 

 

Environmental Health News (Charlottesville, Va.: 29,500 monthly unique users)

“Chemicals higher, thyroid hormone lower in pregnant women near e-waste recycling”

July 20, 2010

 

 

Another study raises concerns about e-waste recycling and its health effects after researchers report that pregnant women in China who live nearer the facilities have higher levels of toxic chemicals and depressed levels of thyroid hormones. Pregnant women who live in areas close to electronic waste dismantling sites have higher exposures to persistent organic pollutants and depressed thyroid hormone levels than those who live farther away from the facilities, finds a study that compares women in two regions of China. Despite the fact that they have no interactions with the e-waste facility, the recycling activities affect the women living adjacent to the sites. This study raises concerns about e-waste practices and health effects on both the mothers and the developing fetuses. (Environmental Science and Technology)

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

GreenCar Website

“Study reveals impact of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles”

July 21, 2010

 

Just what effect could widespread use of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles have on emission levels? Researchers at the University of Colorado, Boulder and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory believe they have the answer. According to the study, published in the ACS journal Environmental Science and Technology, with 100 per cent plug-in hybrid electric vehicle penetration, nitrogen oxides would have been reduced by 27 tons per day from a fleet of 1.7million vehicles and would have increased by three tons per day from power plants. Meanwhile VOC emissions would have been cut by 57 tons per day.

 

 

WebCanine

“Dogs on low-cal diet lived 1.8 yrs longer: study shows”

July 19, 2010

 

Changes caused to bugs in the gut by restricting calorie intake may partly explain why dietary restriction can extend lifespan, according to new analysis from a life-long project looking at the effects of dietary restriction on Labrador Retriever dogs. The research, published in the Journal of Proteome Research, was based on a study in which 24 dogs were paired, with one dog in each pair given 25% less food than the other. Those with a restricted intake of calories lived, on average, about 1.8 years longer than those with a greater intake and they had fewer problems with diseases such as diabetes and osteoarthritis, plus an older median age for onset of late-life diseases.

 

Buffalo News (Buffalo,  N.Y.: daily circulation 181,540)

“The dangers of dust”

July 20, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

 

Household dust may seem relatively harmless to most people, but toxins can be trapped in dust, posing real health risks. According to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), household dust contains everything from skin cells, pet dander and soil tracked in from outside to carpet fibers, fungal spores and tiny particles—which can include harmful chemicals. The sources of these harmful chemicals can range from furniture, electronics, plastics and fabric to outdoor pollutants that enter via open windows or are tracked in on your shoes, clothes, or even your body. Various studies have identified dozens of harmful chemicals in household dust. A study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology in 2007 examining the key routes of exposure of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)—a fire retardant—in first-time mothers. The study examined samples of breast milk and collected dust from commonly used areas of the home using a vacuum. Researchers “found statistically significant, positive associations between PBDE concentrations in breast milk and house dust.”

 

 

National Post (Toronto, Ontario: daily circulation 203,781)

“Spilling the beans”

July 20, 2010

 

 

Growing up, I had a serious distaste for lima beans. Actually, I hated them. Thankfully, my mom did, too, so there was no pressure to force that dry, mealy bean down my gullet. My aversion also extended to kidney beans (so chili was off-limits), brown beans (having pork and beans served at a friend's house was a cruel form of torture for me) and pretty much anything from peas on up… When you think of antioxidant-rich foods, you might think of brightly coloured foods like blueberries, spinach or sweet potatoes, but many varieties of beans and legumes actually rank just as high -- if not higher -- on the antioxidant scale. In fact, according to a 2004 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, some varieties of beans ranked higher in terms of total antioxidants than any other fruit, vegetable or grain. Specifically, red beans ranked the highest, followed by red kidney beans, pinto beans and black beans.

 

 

RF Globalnet (Sewickley, Pa.)

“Submarines Could Use New Nanotube Technology For Sonar And Stealth”

July 18, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Speakers made from carbon nanotube sheets that are a fraction of the width of a human hair can both generate sound and cancel out noise -- properties ideal for submarine sonar to probe the ocean depths and make subs invisible to enemies. That's the topic of a report on these "nanotube speakers," which appears in ACS' Nano Letters, a monthly journal. Ali Aliev and colleagues explain that thin films of nanotubes can generate sound waves via a thermoacoustic effect. Every time that an electrical pulse passes through the microscopic layer of carbon tubes, the air around them heats up and creates a sound wave. Aliev's group showed that nanotube sheets produce the kind of low-frequency sound waves that enable sonar to determine the location, depth, and speed of underwater objects. They also verified that the speakers can be tuned to specific frequencies to cancel out noise, such as the sound of a submarine moving through the depths.

 

 

Environmental Health News (Charlottesville, Va.: 29,500 monthly unique users)

“BADGE, made from BPA, reacts with food”

July 19, 2010

 

Leftover residues of a compound made from bisphenol A (BPA) for use in food can linings reacts with sugars, proteins and other parts of food to form new molecules, researchers report. A main component of food can linings forms new chemicals when it reacts with different parts of food, according to research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. BADGE – which is short for bisphenol A diglycidyl ether – is manufactured from bisphenol A and is a building block of certain types of resins that coat food and drink cans. Like its parent compound, BADGE has endocrine disrupting properties. The researchers from The Netherlands and Great Britain found that BADGE residue left over from manufacturing of the can coating can react with sugars, proteins and other small molecules – for example ethanol in beer. The findings show how critical it is to understand the extent of chemical migration from resin linings into the can's contents and what happens to the compounds once they interact with the food and beverage.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique users)

“Polymer synthesis could aid future electronics”

July 19, 2010

 

 

Tomorrow's television and computer screens could be brighter, clearer and more energy-efficient as a result of a process developed by a team of researchers from Canada and the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The synthesis of a conjugated organic polymer--widely used as a conductive material in devices like light-emitting diodes, televisions and solar cells--could mean more efficient, cheaper electronics. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group of scientists from ORNL and two Canadian universities outlined their success in growing highly structured short chains of polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), or PEDOT. Analysis and understanding of the polymerization process and results were provided with the help of ORNL supercomputers. This research was funded by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Air Force Office of Scientific Research and Asian Office of Aerospace Research and Development of the USA, the Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society.

 

 

Washington State University News (Pullman, Wash.)

“Professor named American Chemical Society fellow”

July 19, 2010

 

 

Yong Wang, Voiland Distinguished Professor in the Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, and associate director of the Institute for Interfacial Catalysis at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been named a Fellow of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Fellows are recognized for their exceptional accomplishments in chemical science and the profession, as well as their service to the ACS. Wang, an internationally known researcher in the area of energy and renewable energy, joined WSU in 2009. He has a joint appointment with the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and WSU. A portion of Wang’s appointment also is funded by WSU’s Agricultural  Research Center, the state’s agricultural experiment station. He is a leading researcher in the area of catalysis and biorenewable energy, where his work has had a significant impact on improving energy efficiency, particularly in the chemical and fuels industries.

 

 

Indiana University News (Bloomington, Ind.)

“High school students, interning through CTSI-SEED program, "take it to next level"

July 19, 2010

 

 

When people ask Rachel Hawn how she's spending her summer vacation, they rarely expect the answer they receive. While many her age are stretched out in the sun or toiling at a summer job, Hawn, a junior at Warren Central High School, has been contributing to laboratory research on targeted gene therapy for colorectal and cervical cancer. Hawn's participation in this project has been made possible by the support of the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI), in partnership with Project SEED, which pairs high school students interested in science and medicine with local research scientists, including many from the Indiana University School of Medicine. This summer, 20 internships are supported by Indiana CTSI, a statewide collaboration among IU, Purdue University and the University of Notre Dame, and sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to accelerate medical innovation and education in Indiana. "Never in my life, not even in college, did I think I would be working with cancer cells," said Hawn, joking that whenever her family hears about what she's working on, they say she's a genius.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

Ability

“The Scent of Cancer”

July 19, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

 

Odors emanating from the skin can be used to identify basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer, according to research out of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia. The findings, presented at an American Chemical Society conference, may lead to even more methods to detect various forms of skin cancer. The researchers “sniffed” air above basal cell tumors and found a different profile of chemical compounds, compared to skin located at the same sites in healthy control subjects.

 

 

Nano Patents and Innovations

By 'Putting A Ring On It,' Microparticles Can Be Captured”

July 20, 2010

 

 

To trap and hold tiny microparticles, engineers at Harvard have "put a ring on it," using a silicon-based circular resonator to confine particles stably for up to several minutes. The advance, published in the June 14 issue of Nano Letters, could one day lead to the ability to direct, deliver, and store nanoparticles and biomolecules on all-optical chips.

WebMD (Orlando,  Fla.: 18.3 million monthly unique users)

“Skin  patches could replace flu jab”

July 19,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) National Meeting release

 

 

Rolling up your sleeve for flu jabs  could one day be a thing of the past, say US scientists, who’ve developed skin  patches covered with microneedles. US Georgia Tech researchers say the tiny  needles are designed to deliver vaccine painlessly to the outer layers of the  skin, dissolving on contact. The new method would be welcome news for people who  are afraid of needles, and the researchers say the patches could be put on by  people without medical training - or people could be allowed to use the patches  themselves during a flu pandemic. The patches use a dry formulation and are said  to be easier to store and distribute. Eliminating needles also removes the need  for ‘sharps’ disposal for used needles and syringes. The researchers believe the  technique would work for other immunisations. If they were mass-produced, they  expect the microneedle patches to cost about the same as traditional jabs, but  with reduced training and disposal costs. In August 2009, the Georgia Tech team  reported to the American Chemical  Society that it hoped to be conducting human trials of the flu  patches in 2010. It was also suggested that microneedles could be used to  deliver medication to the eye to treat macular degeneration. In depth clinical  studies will be needed to check the technique for safety and  effectiveness.

 

 

San  Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, Calif.: daily circulation  241,330)

“Dow  Chemical to Sponsor Olympics Games Through  2020”

July 16,  2010

 

 

Dow Chemical Co., the world's  second-largest chemical maker, agreed to become a worldwide sponsor of the  Olympics through 2020 to gain construction sales in host cities and boost brand  awareness in emerging markets. Dow will be the official chemical company of the  Olympics for the next decade in a partnership with the International Olympic  Committee, the Midland, Michigan-based company said today in a statement. Terms  of the sponsorship weren't disclosed. Dow's sponsorship makes a total of 10  companies paying an average of $90 million each for the four-year cycle ending  in 2014, Gerhard Heiberg, chairman of the IOC's Marketing Commission, said today  in an interview in New York. BASF SE is the world's biggest chemical maker by  sales, according to Chemical &  Engineering News. Dow is the biggest U.S.  chemical maker.

 

 

New  Scientist (London, England: weekly circulation  170,000)

“Green  machine: A salty solution for power generation”

July 19,  2010

 

 

We've already tried to generate  power from ocean waves and tides. Now engineers are trying to tap energy from  another of the sea's abundant resources: salt. Efforts to generate power from  the salinity difference between seawater and fresh water from rivers and lakes  are already well advanced in Europe, where two  alternative approaches are being tried out. Last week Redstack, based in Sneek  in the Netherlands, was  granted permits to build a pilot salt battery at the Afsluitdijk **** in the  north of the country, fuelled by waters from an inland lake and the North Sea. The plant should initially be able to deliver  5 kilowatts, but the company wants to increase this to 50 kilowatts over the  next few years if funding is secured, says director Pieter Hack… Electrons from  the now negatively charged chloride electrode then begin flowing to the  positively charged sodium electrode, generating a current between the two. Once  the seawater electrons are exhausted, fresh water is pumped into the chamber,  the sodium ions are drawn back through the membrane to the water, and the  electrons begin to flow in the opposite direction. By constantly switching  between salty and fresh water in this way, the device generates an alternating  current (Environmental Science and  Technology).

 

 

Science  Magazine (Washington D.C.: weekly circulation  125,000)

“The  Case of the Poisoned Fuel Cell”

July 16,  2010

 

 

Battery-powered cars may be on the  cusp of the mainstream auto market, but scientists and car makers still have  high hopes for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, which should refuel faster and  travel longer distances between fill-ups. Hydrogen fuel cells have their own  Achilles' heel, however: They are easily poisoned by carbon monoxide (CO). Now,  researchers report that they've created novel catalysts for fuel cell cars that  strongly resist carbon monoxide contamination, potentially solving a problem  that has vexed the industry for years. In a paper posted online this week in the  Journal of the American Chemical  Society, the Cornell team reports that when its new nanoparticle  catalysts carried out their job with hydrogen spiked with 2% CO, their  performance dropped only 5% compared with a 30% drop for commercial catalysts.  Although Abruña says it's not clear why the new catalyst is better, he suspects  that during the reaction, hydroxide groups (OH–) bind to the titanium tungsten  oxide close to the platinum, putting them in close proximity to react with  incoming CO molecules to form CO2.

 

 

RedOrbit (Dallas, Tex.: 4.2 million monthly unique  users)

“Chemists  Grow Crystals With A Twist -- And Untwist”

July 16,  2010

 

 

Chemists from New York University and Russia's St. Petersburg State University have created crystals that can  twist and untwist, pointing to a much more varied process of crystal growth than  previously thought. Their work, which appears in the latest issue of the  Journal of the American Chemical  Society, may explain some of the properties of high-polymers, which  are used in clothing and liquid crystal displays, among other consumer products.  Crystal growth  has traditionally been viewed as a collection of individual atoms, molecules, or  small clusters adding to a larger block that remains in a fixed translational  relationship to the rest. But the NYU and St. Petersburg State University chemists discovered a wholly  new phenomenon for growth— a crystal that continually changes its shape as it  grows. To do this, the researchers focused on crystals from hippuric acid—a  derivative of the amino acid glycine.

 

 

MediaGlobal (New York, N.Y.)

“Too  little too late: A mega-water project gone  awry”

July 15,  2010

 

 

China’s  South-North Water Transfer Project serves as the latest global example of a  mega-project gone awry. Carrying water from the Yangtze River in the south to  the Yellow and Hai  Rivers in the north, the  project has displaced over 375,000 people, cost more than double the original  projections, and includes environmental degradation at every turn. The Chinese  government is getting more than they bargained for… It has been revealed that  many of these negative fallouts could have been avoided with environmentally  efficient water conservation initiatives. The American Chemical Society, in collaboration  with the Journal of Environmental Science and  Technology, conducted a study that cited several viable alternatives,  all of which would have avoided the cost, environmental harm, and human  displacement of the current project.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Defense  Talk

“Submarines Could Use New  Nanotube Technology For Sonar And Stealth”

July 16,  2010

 

 

Speakers made from carbon nanotube  sheets that are a fraction of the width of a human hair can both generate sound and cancel out noise - properties ideal for submarine  sonar to probe the ocean depths and make subs invisible to enemies. That's the  topic of a report on these "nanotube speakers," which appears in ACS' Nano Letters, a monthly  journal.

 

 

Eco  Friendly Mag

“Modelling the Impact of PHEVs  on Ozone in Denver”

July 19,  2010

 

 

Researchers at the University of Colorado, Boulder and  the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) modeled the emissions impact had  plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) replaced light duty gasoline vehicles  in the Denver, Colorado area in summer 2006. In their study,  published online 15 June in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology,  they found that with 100% PHEV penetration, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions would  have been reduced by 27 tons per day (tpd) from a fleet of 1.7 million vehicles  and would have increased by 3 tpd from power plants. VOC emissions would have  been reduced by 57 tpd.

 

 

Canada.com (Toronto, Ontario: 6 million monthly unique users)

“Mercury levels increasing in popular species of Lake Erie game fish”

July 15, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

 

Mercury levels in a species of Lake  Erie game fish are increasing after two decades of steady decline, scientists report. The joint study by researchers from the Ontario and federal government and the University of Toronto is the most comprehensive to date on mercury levels in Great Lakes fish, and was published in the journal ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology. Between 1990 and 2007, despite a levelling off of mercury concentrations in Lake Ontario walleye, contamination increased in Lake Erie walleye. Researchers hypothesize that the invasions of dreissenid mussels and round goby fish in the ecosystem contributed to the rise in Lake Erie mercury concentrations. High levels of mercury can potentially cause adverse health effects if affected fish are consumed.

 

 

Oneindia (Bangalore, India: 7.3 million monthly unique users)

“Soon, colour e-readers for richer reading experience”

July 15, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

E-readers may soon have colour displays, thanks to new advances in display technology. Manufacturers sold a million e-readers in 2008 and 5 million units last year. The figure could reach more than 20 million strong by 2013, according to one market analyst cited in the article. But so far the e-readers only have black and white displays. Colour displays could open up new markets, such as those for textbooks and magazines, and help them compete with multifunction devices like Apple's iPad, the article notes. However, colourizing e-readers has been a difficult challenge. One company is trying to overcome it by using simple colour filters to dress-up the black and white "ink" used in many e-reader displays. Others companies are developing entirely new types of electronic ink, including colour oils and special polymers that mimic gemstone opals. (Chemical & Engineering News)

 

 

Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 2.7 million monthly unique users)

“Toward Making 'Extended Blood Group Typing' More Widely Available”

July 14, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Scientists are reporting an advance toward enabling more blood banks to adopt so-called "extended blood group typing," which increases transfusion safety by better matching donors and recipients. Their report on a new, automated genetic method for determining a broader range of blood types appears in ACS' Analytical Chemistry. The study describes evaluation of the new more affordable method, called the HiFi Blood 96, which types blood with DNA testing in a high-speed automated procedure. Tests on 293 human blood samples demonstrated the performance and reliability of the new method. The report compares HiFi Blood 96 to existing commercial tests, and discusses improvements that are underway.

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.4 million monthly unique users)

 

“American Chemical Society Webinar focuses on building a company from the ground up”

July 15, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

 

News media and others interested in the chemical sciences are invited to join the next in a series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars™, focusing on building a company from scratch. Scheduled for Thursday, July 22, from 2 - 3 p.m. EDT, the free ACS Webinar™ will feature Brian Morin, Ph.D., CEO and Founder of Innegrity LLC, a successful high performance fiber manufacturer focusing on the composites industry. He will speak on Living with Vertigo: An Entrepreneurial Story in the Chemical Industry. Morin's topics will include the roller coaster ride of starting a company in four easy steps, dropping seeds: Developing a business plan and launching your company, and free fall: What could go wrong, anticipating it, and learning from the experience.

 

 

Medical News Today (U.K.: 1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Supercharged Proteins Enter Biology's Forbidden Zone”

July 15, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Scientists are reporting discovery of a way to help proteins such as the new generation of protein-based drugs -- sometimes heralded as tomorrow's potential "miracle cures" -- get past the biochemical "Entrance Forbidden" barrier that keeps them from entering cells and doing their work. The new technique, described in the monthly journal, ACS Chemical Biology, represents a new use for an engineered form of green fluorescent protein, the topic of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry that is one of the most important research tools in biosciences. David Liu and his team tested the hybrid proteins on five types of cells, and found that they were extremely good at carrying their protein cargo inside. In fact, the supercharged protein was up to 100 times better at getting proteins into cells compared to other approaches. The delivered proteins were able to go to their target locations in the cell, such as the nucleus or cytoplasm, and perform their jobs.

 

 

MIT Technology Review (Cambridge, Mass.: bi-monthly circulation 315,000)

“Nanopillars that Trap More Light”

July 16, 2010

 

 

A material with a novel nanostructure developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley could lead to lower-cost solar cells and light detectors. It absorbs light just as well as commercial thin-film solar cells but uses much less semiconductor material. The new material consists of an array of nanopillars that are narrow at the top and thicker at the bottom. The narrow tops allow light to penetrate the array without reflecting off. The thicker bottom absorbs light so that it can be converted into electricity. The design absorbs 99 percent of visible light, compared to the 85 percent absorbed by an earlier design in which the nanopillars were the same thickness along their entire length. Many nanostructrued materials have complex designs and require cumbersome fabrication methods to deposit multiple layers, says Ali Javey, an electrical engineering and computer science professor at UC Berkeley who is leading the new work, which is posted in the journal Nano Letters. He says the technique to grow the nanopillars is relatively simple and low-cost.

 

 

Energy Efficiency News (Cheltenham, U.K.)

“Biofuel exceeds UK Government targets but fails on sustainability”

July 16, 2010

 

 

The proportion of biofuel in road transport fuel exceeded the UK Government’s target last year, but largely failed to meet sustainability criteria, according to the latest figures from the Renewable Fuel Agency (RFA). Under the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO) introduced in 2008, fossil fuel suppliers have to include a certain proportion of ‘renewable’ biofuel and report the feedstock and source of the fuel. According to the RFA, the supplied biofuel provided carbon savings of 51% compared with petrol and diesel, but admit that the calculated savings to not take into account the potential impact from indirect land use change (ILUC). Taking ILUC into account could make a significant difference to the figures, however. According to a recent article in Environmental Science and Technology, including ILUC in calculations reveals that some biofuel – particularly corn-based – actually increases greenhouse gas emissions over long periods.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

Green Car Congress

“GM Electrochemists Suggest Ongoing Investment in Both Battery and Fuel Cell Research; Connecting the Science with Vehicle Engineering”

July 15, 2010

 

In a Perspective published in ACS’s Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers from the Electrochemical Energy Research Laboratory (EERL), General Motors Research & Development, suggest that given the strong societal need for full vehicle electrification and the respective technical challenges and commercial risk entailed, both Li-ion batteries and fuel cell systems for powering electric vehicles warrant continued strong development investment.

 

 

Aromea Café

“Why You Should Use a Water Ionizer”

July 16, 2010

 

 

An alkaline water ionizer will take regular tap water and produce energized water or alkaline ionized water, which is fundamentally what we are made of and what we need to live. The majority of bottled water is sold in polyethylene terephthalate bottles, indicated by a number 1, PET or PETE on the bottle’s bottom. The bottles are generally safe, says Ken Smith, Ph.D., immediate past chair of the American Chemical Society’s division of environmental chemistry. But scientists say when stored in hot or warm temperatures, the plastic may leak chemicals into the water.

Popular  Science (New York, N.Y.: monthly circulation 1.3  million)

“Nanotech  Sonar Speakers and Microphones Could Make Subs  Stealthier”

July 14,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

 

Carbon nanotubes could provide  better stealth technology for submarines, helping them to "see" other undersea  objects while remaining invisible to enemy subs. A report in ACS’ Nano Letters details a new application of a  previously-known property of sheets of carbon nanotubes just a fraction of the  width of a human hair that nonetheless can generate sound and cancel out noise  far better than current sound-generating tech. The thin films of carbon  nanotubes create sound through a thermoacoustic effect, turning electrical  pulses into tiny sound waves via heat generated in the air around the nanotubes  when the pulses pass through. Now, researchers including a team from UT Dallas  have demonstrated that sheets of nanotubes can produce low-frequency sound ideal  for mapping out the ocean depths with sonar, and those frequencies can be  fine-tuned to cancel out other background noise, like the sound of the submarine  itself moving through the water.

 

 

Montreal Gazette (Montreal, Quebec: daily circulation  454,200)

“Mercury  levels increasing in popular species of Lake Erie game fish”

July 15,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Mercury levels in a species of  Lake Erie game fish are increasing after two  decades of steady decline, scientists report. The joint study by researchers  from the Ontario and federal government and the  University of Toronto is the most comprehensive to date on mercury  levels in Great Lakes fish, and was published  in the journal Environmental Science &  Technology. An analysis of the nearly 6,000 samples of lake trout and  walleye collected from the lakes between the 1970s and 2007 showed that  concentrations in the fish steadily declined in that period in the upper Great  Lakes — Superior and Huron. But between 1990 and 2007, despite a levelling off  of mercury concentrations in Lake  Ontario walleye, contamination  increased in Lake Erie walleye.

 

 

Thaindian  News (Bangkok, Thailand: 2.1 million monthly unique  users)

“Soon,  colour e-readers for richer reading experience”

July 15,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

E-readers may soon have colour  displays, thanks to new advances in display technology. This development is  among the topics highlighted in a three-part cover story on electronic materials  in the current issue of Chemical &  Engineering News (C&EN), ACS’ weekly newsmagazine. C&EN  Senior Editor Alex Tullo notes that sales of e-readers, such as Amazon’s Kindle  and Sony’s Reader, are on the rise. Manufacturers sold a million e-readers in  2008 and 5 million units last year. The figure could reach more than 20 million  strong by 2013, according to one market analyst cited in the article. But so far  the e-readers only have black and white displays. Colour displays could open up  new markets, such as those for textbooks and magazines, and help them compete  with multifunction devices like Apple’s iPad, the article  notes.

 

 

American  National Standards Institute (Washington D.C.: 74,200 monthly unique  users)

“Did  You Know?”

July 9,  2010

Origin: OPA  Podcast

 

 

The American Chemical Society (ACS), an ANSI  organizational member, has several free podcasts available to all interested  stakeholders detailing global challenges and the solutions made possible through  chemistry. Topics covered by the series include diagnosing pneumonia to promote  public health; decomposing plastics using ultraviolet light, heat, and fungi; an  inhalable powder that vaccinates against the measles; and more. To learn more,  see the ACS  Global Challenges/Chemistry Solutions page.

 

 

The  Medical News (Sydney, Australia: 435,000 monthly unique  users)

“Report  on new, automated genetic method for determining blood types appears in  Analytical Chemistry”

July 15,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

Scientists are reporting an advance  toward enabling more blood banks to adopt so-called "extended blood group  typing," which increases transfusion safety by better matching donors and  recipients. Their report on a new, automated genetic method for determining a  broader range of blood types appears in ACS' Analytical Chemistry, a semi-monthly  journal. Christophe Marquette and colleagues explain that most blood banks still  use a century-old blood approach to blood typing. The study describes evaluation  of the new more affordable method, called the HiFi Blood 96, which types blood  with DNA testing in a high-speed automated procedure. Tests on 293 human blood  samples demonstrated the performance and reliability of the new method. The  report compares HiFi Blood 96 to existing commercial tests, and discusses  improvements that are underway.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique  users)

“Nanotubes pass acid  test”

July 14,  2010

 

 

Rice University scientists have found  the "ultimate" solvent for all kinds of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a breakthrough  that brings the creation of a highly conductive quantum nanowire ever closer.  Nanotubes have the frustrating habit of bundling, making them less useful than  when they're separated in a solution. Rice scientists led by Matteo Pasquali, a  professor in chemical and biomolecular engineering and in chemistry, have been  trying to untangle them for years as they look for scalable methods to make  exceptionally strong, ultralight, highly conductive materials that could  revolutionize power distribution, such as the armchair quantum wire. Pasquali,  primary author Nicholas Parra-Vasquez and their colleagues reported this month  in the online journal ACS  Nano that chlorosulfonic acid can  dissolve half-millimeter-long nanotubes in solution, a critical step in spinning  fibers from ultralong nanotubes.

 

 

… From the  Blogs

 

 

Living  in Thin

“Who  knew? Your greens may benefit from sitting in the supermarket after  all”

July 14,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

 

It seems that sitting in the produce  section isn’t such a bag thing after all – according to new research published  in the Journal of Agricultural and Food  Chemistry spinach that is exposed to fluorescent light for up to 8  days ends up with higher levels of vitamins C, E and folate. Apparently even the  light in most grocery stores is still enough to trigger photosynthesis, which  produces more nutrients in the leaves.

 

 

GenomeWeb

“Drugs,  Naturally”

July 12,  2010

 

 

Natural products and their  structures are often used as leads in drug discoveries. But should they be? In  the Pipeline's Derek Lowe reviews a paper in the Journal of the American Chemical Society by  the Broad Institute's Stuart Schreiber and Paul Clemons, that says natural  products tend to target high-gene interaction targets for the treatment of  disease, ignoring the more specific targets, Lowe  says.

 

Politico (Arlington, Va.: daily circulation 32,090)

“Time's up on costly runoff elections”

July 13, 2010

 

 

Alabama voters — at least a few of them — are heading to the polls Tuesday for a runoff election to decide the Republican gubernatorial nominee. This sort of vote might be history soon. For there’s a growing debate about whether such runoffs serve states well — and a growing interest in alternative voting methods designed to elect a majority winner in one election. One alternative for many states would be a ballot method called instant runoff voting — already used for some overseas voters. IRV simulates a runoff election — but without low voter turnout and high cost to taxpayers. IRV has replaced two rounds of voting in some cities, including Oakland, Calif.; Minneapolis; and Memphis, Tenn. New   York City’s charter commission recently made a provisional recommendation to put on the November ballot a measure to use IRV in primaries. Meanwhile, Ireland and Australia now use it in national elections. And Britain is likely to hold a national referendum about it next year. Large associations, including the American Political Science Association and American Chemical Society, have counted on it for many years.


Chemical Online (Erie, Pa.)

“American Chemical Society Webinar: A Mid-Year Update On Successful Financing”

July 13, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) press release

 

 

News media and others interested in the chemical sciences are invited to join the next in a series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars, focusing on building the right mix for successful financing. Scheduled for Thursday, July 15, from 2 – 3 p.m. EDT, the free ACS Webinar will feature David Porter of Apposite Capital, a chemist and one of HealthInvestor's 50 most influential people of 2009. Porter will speak on VC Talk: How to Sell Your Science & Get Investors. Porter's topics will include: The importance of management — assessing whether you have a financeable management team, how to present your science and technology without sounding geeky and the importance of selling the commercial opportunity and how to do it.

 

 

Renewable Energy Magazine (Madrid, Spain)

“New mobile facility for processing biofuels”

July 13, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

The attached diagram shows the layout for a new method for processing agricultural waste and any available biomass into biofuels. Researchers at Purdue University are proposing the creation of mobile processing plants that could move around to produce the fuels using the technique, called fast-hydropyrolysis-hydrodeoxygenation. Chemical engineers at Purdue University have developed a new method to process agricultural waste and other biomass into biofuels, and they are proposing the creation of mobile processing plants that would rove around to produce the fuels. Biomass along with hydrogen will be fed into a high-pressure reactor and subjected to extremely fast heating, rising to as hot as 900 degrees Fahrenheit in less than a second… The Environmental Science & Technology paper outlines the process, showing how a portion of the biomass is used as a source of hydrogen to convert the remaining biomass to liquid fuel.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique users)

“Nanomaterials in the construction industry and resulting health and safety issues”

July 13, 2010

 

Tailing after emerging nanotechnology applications in biomedical and electronic industries, the construction industry recently started seeking out a way to advance conventional construction materials using a variety of manufactured nanomaterials. The use of nanotechnology materials and applications in the construction industry should be considered not only for enhancing material properties and functions but also in the context of energy conservation. A recent review by scientists at Rice  University has looked at the benefits of using nanomaterials in construction materials but also highlights the potentially harmful aspects of releasing nanomaterials into the environment. Use of nanomaterials in construction: Carbon nanotubes – Expected benefits are mechanical durability and crack prevention (in cement); enhanced mechanical and thermal properties (in ceramics); real-time structural health monitoring (NEMS/MEMS); and effective electron mediation (in solar cells). Silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2) – Expected benefits are reinforcement in mechanical strength (in concrete); coolant, light transmission, and fire resistance (in ceramics); flame-proofing and anti-reflection (in windows). (ACS Nano)

 

 

Nanotechnology Today

Organic nanoelectronics a step closer”

July 12, 2010

 

 

Although they could revolutionize a wide range of high-tech products such as computer displays or solar cells, organic materials do not have the same ordered chemical composition as inorganic materials, preventing scientists from using them to their full potential. But an international team of researchers led by McGill's Dr. Dmitrii Perepichka and the Institut national de la recherche scientifique's Dr. Federico Rosei have published research that shows how to solve this decades-old conundrum. The team has effectively discovered a way to order the molecules in the PEDOT, the single most industrially important conducting polymer. Perepichka is affiliated with McGill University's department of chemistry and Rosei is affiliated with Institut national de la recherche scientifique – Énergie  Matériaux Télécommunications  Center, a member of the Université du Québec network. Their research was published online by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and was funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and Asian Office of Aerospace Research and Development of the USA, the Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society, the Fonds québécois de recherche sur la nature et les technologies, and the Ministère du Développement économique, de l'Innovation et de l'Exportation of Quebec.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

Central Science (includes video)

“A Chemist And A Physicist Are Swinging in A Hammock …”

July 13, 2010

 

 

Unfortunately, this is not the intro to a bad joke. It is a recap of Sunday night’s episode of “Big Brother” on CBS. On the latest episode of CBS’s “Big Brother 12,” houseguest Rachel Reilly revealed that she has a degree in chemistry and is a member of the American Chemical Society (Wait for it at the :45 mark of the embedded video). She was speaking with fellow houseguest Brendon Villegas, who indicated that he has studied physical chemistry and intends to pursue a Ph.D. in biomedical physics at UCLA. The steamy encounter between the two houseguests—who both said that they find intelligence sexy—spurred talk of a “showmance” in bloom.

 

 

Remmel Wellness  Center

“When Food Interacts with Medication”

July 14, 2010

 

According to the latest government reports, there is a 50/50 chance that you are on at least one prescription medication.  What you may not realize is that the foods that you eat may adversely interact with the medications you are taking… In one recent study, Dr. [John Thor] Arnason’s team examined dozens of different kinds of beers. They found that the “hoppier” or more bitter beers reduced the effect of the cancer drug Tamoxifen, when compared with beers that were less hopped. The study was published this year in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

 

ABC News (New York, N.Y.: 12.2 million monthly unique users)

“Recycled Cigarette Butts Can Keep Steel From Rusting”

July 10, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

 

When you think recycling, newspapers, plastic bottles and aluminum cans probably come to mind. But one researcher wants to add cigarette butts to the list. Jun Zhao, a Ph.D. student in the School of Energy and Power Engineering at Xi'an Jiaotong University in China, and a team of scientists found that cigarette butts can be put to good use. Their study, which is published in the American Chemical Society journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, shows that extracts of cigarette butts that have been submerged in water can help prevent steel from rusting. Application of the cigarette material to N80, a type of steel, could save millions of dollars a year that oil industries spend on steel repair, the study says. The research suggests that nine chemicals — such as nicotine — in cigarette butts work to inhibit corrosion.

 

 

ABC Science (Sydney, Australia: 627,900 monthly unique users)

“Your hair reveals where you've been”

July 8, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

Soft drink, bottled water and sometimes beer leave a geographic imprint that lasts until you get a trim, found a new study. The research, as it progresses, is helping investigators identify crime victims with hair by showing where people spent time before they died. Along with other forensic strategies, the technique has already been used to help solve at least one mystery. "Police departments and sheriff departments contact us with cold cases with no leads and say: 'Can you analyse the hair and tell us something about where the victim was from?'" says analytical chemist Lesley Chesson, of IsoForensics, a scientific research company in Salt Lake City. For the new study, Chesson and colleagues wanted to look beyond tap water to see if other common beverages also reflect their origins. On three massive road trips around the United States, Chesson bought cans and bottles of soft drink, bottled water and beer from 33 cities. She also collected samples of tap water and brought everything back to her lab for testing. The results, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, showed a close match in isotope ratios between tap water, soft drink and bottled water from each area, probably because local bottling plants use local water. The beer showed a weaker match because there are only 12 breweries around the country manufacturing the brand chosen.

 

 

Times of India (New Delhi,  India: daily circulation 3.15 million)

“Nanoparticle bandage can treat infection”

July 10, 2010

 

A ‘self medicating’ bandage laced with nanoparticles can detect harmful bacteria in a burn wound and respond by secreting antibiotics. "Fifty per cent of all people who die as a result of burn injuries do so as a direct consequence of infection, which is why this research is so important," New Scientist quoted Toby Jenkins from the University of Bath, UK, who is developing the bandage with an international team of researchers, as saying. The idea behind the bandage is that while harmful bacteria cause infections by attacking cells with toxins that dissolve the cell membrane, ‘friendly’ bacteria, which help the body to function, don't. The report appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

 

 

New Orleans Times-Picayune (New Orleans,  La.: daily circulation 157,068)

“Lead levels in New Orleans soil dropped after Katrina and Rita flooding, study finds”

July 12, 2010

 

 

Soil lead levels in New Orleans declined significantly after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, precipitating a correlated reduction in children’s blood lead levels, according to a study published recently in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. The study, a collaboration between researchers from Colorado State University and Tulane University, was based on soil data collected from 46 different census tracts throughout the New Orleans metropolitan area, once in 2000 and again in 2006; and on blood lead level data furnished by the Louisiana Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program for children age 6 or younger. Researchers found that levels of lead contamination in the soil dropped by 46 percent on average after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in the surveyed areas, and that the parts of the city hardest hit by flooding experienced a more dramatic drop in lead levels than areas that weren’t as severely inundated.

 

 

Medical News Today (U.K.: 1.1 million monthly unique users)

“DNA Through Graphene Nanopores”

July 13, 2010

 

A team of researchers from Delft University of Technology announces a new type of nanopore devices that may significantly impact the way we screen DNA molecules, for example to read off their sequence. In a paper entitled 'DNA Translocation through Graphene Nanopores' (published online in Nano Letters), they report a novel technique to fabricate tiny holes in a layer of graphene (a carbon layer with a thickness of only 1 atom) and they managed to detect the motion of individual DNA molecules that travel through such a hole. Graphene is a unique and very special material, and yet widely available: Everyone has graphene at home: graphite is made of layers of graphene and occurs in for example the carbon of pencils, charcoal, or candle soot. But in this research, graphene is used because of that special property that one can make single-atom-thin monolayers of graphene.

 

 

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000)

“PNNL’s Wang Named Fellow of American Chemical Society”

July 12, 2010

 

 

Yong Wang, associate director of the Institute for Interfacial Catalysis at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Voiland Distinguished Professor in the Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering at Washington  State University, has been named a Fellow of the American Chemical Society, or ACS. Fellows are recognized for their exceptional accomplishments in chemical science and the profession, as well as their service to the ACS. Wang, an internationally known researcher in the area of energy and renewable energy, has a joint appointment with the Department of Energy national laboratory and WSU. A portion of Wang's appointment also is funded by WSU's Agricultural  Research Center, the state's agricultural experiment station. He is a leading researcher in the area of catalysis and biorenewable energy, where his work has had a significant impact on improving energy efficiency, particularly in the chemical and fuels industries.

 

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 70,700 monthly unique users)

“Nanogenerator for mechanical energy harvesting”

July 9, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

The journal, Nano Letters, recently published an article highlighting the fascinating nanogenerators developed by Dr. Yong Shi, a professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Stevens Institute of Technology. Dr. Shi's work focuses on miniature energy harvesting technologies that could potentially power wireless electronics, portable devices, stretchable electronics, and implantable biosensors. The concept involves piezoelectric nanowire- and nanofiber-based generators that would power such devices through a conversion of mechanical energy into electrical energy. Dr. Shi uses a piezoelectric nanogenerator based on PZT nanofibers. The PZT nanofibers, with a diameter and length of approximately 60 nm and 500 µm, are aligned on interdigitated electrodes of platinum fine wires and packaged using a soft polymer on a silicon substrate. The measured output voltage and power under periodic stress application to the soft polymer was 1.63 V and 0.03 MicroWatts, respectively.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

Earth911

“The $8 Million Caffeine Jolt”

July 13, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

We may rely on it for our daily dose of caffeine, but coffee goes farther than fueling just our minds. A study published in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry estimates that from the approximately 16 billion pounds of coffee grown each year, 340 millions gallons of biodiesel could be generated.

 

 

Philosophy of Science Portal

“Teaching kids about science in a fun way”

July 12, 2010

 

 

Jenn Donenberg has not been around campus much this summer, but for one weekend she decided to make a trip down to help some middle school girls out with their chemistry. Donenberg, a junior in LAS, was just one of a handful of volunteers from the University’s Department of Chemistry to participate in the second weekend of the annual “Bonding With Chemistry: A Day Camp for Girls” on Saturday. The first round of campers participated earlier this summer on June 26. The day camp, presented by the East Central Illinois Women Chemists Committee, first began in 2008 with a grant from the American Chemical Society and aims to encourage middle school girls from around Illinois to develop an interest in science, said Lindsay Sperling, graduate student in chemistry and day camp coordinator.

 

 

 

Popular Science (New York, N.Y.: monthly circulation 1.3 million)

“Chemical Beverage Signatures Allow Geographical Tracking of People By What They've Been Drinking”

June 30, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

 

Your beer can tell you where you’ve been, according to a new study by researchers in Utah. No, not because of the strength of your hangover -- it’s all about chemistry. Beer, bottled water and soda have a natural chemical signature related to geographic location, and drinking them leaves a chemical fingerprint in your hair. The fingerprint could be used to track your travels over time, according to the study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. It works by measuring different isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. The proportion of those isotopes varies according to geographic differences like altitude and latitude -- it’s different in Denver compared to Dallas or Des Moines, according to the American Chemical Society. The differences yield an “iso-signature” that can be tied to specific regions. This signature shows up in your hair. As ACS explains, the body removes hydrogen and oxygen atoms from water and incorporates them into proteins, including keratin, which is in your hair. This means the hydrogen and oxygen isotopes would show up in those proteins, and if you know which isotope patterns exist in which spots, you can deduce where -- if not what -- someone had been drinking.

 

 

New York Daily News (New York, N.Y.: daily circulation 632,595)

“Cavities, be gone! Breakthrough new gel that regenerates teeth could replace dentist's drill”

June 29, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

A new gel that encourages teeth to regenerate may replace the anxiety-producing drill and fill method of treating cavities, according to Discovery.com. The innovative technology, in which a peptide is embedded in a thin, flexible film or gel, could also eliminate root canals. But it’s not meant to replace brushing and flossing. "It’s not like toothpaste," said Nadia Benkirane-Jessel, co-author of a recent paper on the subject and a scientist at the Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (the National Institute for Health and Medical Research) in Paris. For the research, published in the journal ACS Nano, French scientists applied the film or gel (both of which contained MSH) to mice teeth that already had cavities. One month later, the cavities were gone. Benkirane-Jessel stresses that the MSH-filled products are just to treat, not to prevent, cavities.

 

 

Times of India (New Delhi,  India: daily circulation 3.15 million)

“Go ‘green’ after death”

July 1, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

People who care for the environment can contribute after their death too - by opting for eco-friendly method of burial or cremation. Entrepreneurs in Europe have developed two new and unusual methods of body disposal - including a low-heat cremation method and a corpse compost method that turns bodies into soil - both safe for the environment. Cremation produces carbon dioxide and releases mercury from dental fillings into the air, while formaldehyde and other toxic substances that used to prepare bodies for burial can leach into the environment. However, according to C&EN Associate Editor Sarah Everts, the new cremation method uses a highly corrosive alkaline instead of high heat to break down the corpse. The low heat ensures use of less energy and lower carbon dioxide emissions. The article is published in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), ACS' weekly newsmagazine.

 

 

The Independent (London, England: daily circulation 183,547)

“Protect your pucker and gut”

July 1, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

All SPF lip balms are not created equal. In fact some can actually harm your gut and cells in your colon when ingested, found researchers in a study published in journal Chemical Research in Toxicology. The culprit is sunscreen (or zinc oxide) nanoparticles defined as itty-bitty particles, not detectable to the eye, that are described by the US wellness publisher Rodale as "one/one hundred thousandth of the width of a human hair." Philip Moos, assistant pharmacology and toxicology professor at the University of Utah in the US, led the study and found that when children and adults alike lick their lips and have a sunblock or SPF lip balm on their lips the sunscreen particles are "twice as toxic to the cells as larger particles." "There have been some concerns about different nanomaterials, and zinc happens to be one that can be quite toxic if it comes into contact with cells," explained Moos to Rodale on June 29.

 

 

United Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.5 million monthly unique users)

“Hand washing improves drinking water”

June 30, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

U.S. scientists say hand washing can improve the bacterial count of water collected at sources and brought home in containers. Alexandria Boehm, Jenna Davis of Stanford University say about half of the world's population, more than 3 billion people, have no access to municipal drinking water and obtain drinking water from wells, springs and other sources and store it in jugs and other containers. Past research showed stored water can have higher levels of bacterial contamination than the water at its source. Boehm, Davis and students find a strong link between fecal contamination on the hands of household residents and bacterial contamination in stored water in Dar es Salaam,  Tanzania. The study is published in the Environmental Science & Technology.

 

 

The Bellingham Herald (Bellingham, Wash.: daily circulation 23,933)

“OLYMPIA: Author to discuss issues affecting oceans, environment”

July 1, 2010

 

 

Oceanographer and author Curt Ebbesmeyer will discuss a range of issues, including the BP oil spill and floating ocean garbage patches, during a science cafe gathering at 7 p.m. July 13. The discussion will be at the Batdorf & Bronson Coffee House, 516 Capitol Way S., Olympia. It is sponsored by the Puget Sound Chapter of the American Chemical Society.

 

 

Broadcast TV

 

 

CTV News Tonight with Marcia MacMillan (Toronto, Ontario)

Dentist’s drill a thing of the past?”

June 30, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

Advancements in dentistry could make the drill a thing of the past. Researchers in France found when a peptide was put on the decaying tooth the cavity healed on its own. The cavity disappeared. The study is in the journal ACS Nano.

 

 

… From the Blogs

 

 

Science for All

“The Chemistry of Fireworks”

June 30, 2010

Origin: OPA Podcast

 

For your 4th of July enjoyment- a video on the chemistry of fireworks by Bytesize Science.

 

Online Program Reviews

“Recent trends in the Treatment of Diabetes”

July 1, 2010

 

 

Diabetes is not a newly born disease, it has been with human race from long back but, we came to knew about it in 1552 B.C. The discovery of a new polymer that may allow development of an effective insulin pill was reported at a recent meeting of the American Chemical Society. When the polymer is used as a pill coating, it allows insulin to get into the bloodstream without being destroyed by the digestive system. So far it has only been tested in animals. Some experts question whether insulin in pill form will prove useful, since dosing is so critical and often variable.