Taken from R&D Magazine: “American Chemical Society co-hosts Science and Society discussion on food safety on Nov. 1”

 

 

The American Chemical Society (ACS) invites news media to attend another in a continuing series of discussions with leading scientists, economists, and politicians on a wide range of timely scientific topics, including energy, nuclear terrorism, food safety, and climate and energy policy. Entitled "Science & Society: Global Challenges," the next event will focus on food safety and be held Nov. 1 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), 1200 New York Avenue, N.W., in Washington, D.C. A reception will precede the session at 5 p.m. Please note that news media must RSVP. Co-sponsored by AAAS and the Georgetown University Program on Science in the Public Interest, the next two events in the Science & Society series will include the following presenters and topics: Nov. 1: Topic: Coming to the Table on Food Safety (Bisphenol A and Beyond) Experts: Sarah Vogel, Johnson Family Foundation; Christopher Borgert, University of Florida, Gainesville

Taken from Science Daily: “Scientists 'Cage' Genetic Off Switches So They Can Be Activated by UV Light”

 

 

Researchers at North Carolina  State University have found a way to "cage" genetic off switches in such a way that they can be activated when exposed to UV light. Their technology gives scientists a more precise way to control and study gene function in localized areas of developing organisms. The off switches, called morpholino oligonucleotides, are like short snippets of DNA that, when introduced into cells, bind to target RNA molecules, effectively turning off specific genes. Dr. Alex Deiters, associate professor of chemistry, Dr. Jeffrey Yoder, associate professor of molecular biomedical sciences, and a team of NC State researchers developed a new methodology to turn off genes at a specific time and in a specific region of an organism. Deiters' team devised a way to synthesize morpholinos that would only bind with RNA molecules after a brief exposure to UV light, effectively "caging" the morpholino and providing a method for precisely controlling the genetic off switch. The researchers' results appear online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Taken from Examiner.com: “Virtual career fair scheduled for chemical industry”

 

 

The American Chemical Society (ACS) has scheduled a virtual career fair for November 2nd and 3rd in conjunction with Informex and C&EN. According to ACS there are benefits to this virtual format as shown here: Job Seekers, meet employers and recruiters from around the world, explore career options, network with peers and colleagues, and attend valuable webinars that will help you advance your career. Employers and recruiters, meet global talent from the chemical, pharma and biotech industries. You'll be able to review candidates' resumes and profiles, and communicate with candidates using email, real-time chat, or video chat. The day will open with a keynote from Rudy Baum, Editor-in-chief, C&EN at 10:30 ET. Additional webinars will follow throughout the day.

Taken from New Scientist: “Smallest electric engine could power nanomachines”

 

 

A blueprint has been sketched out for the smallest ever electric motor, which could eventually be used to drive tiny conveyor belts or pumps in future nanomachines. The motor's rotor is a long, coal-derived molecule called anthracene, which spins around an axle composed of two ethynyl units. Each end of this axle is connected to an electrode, and a third electrode – called the gate – is located slightly below the axle. Applying an alternating current to this gate electrode sets up an oscillating electric field that surrounds the molecular motor and, according to the researchers' calculations, should cause the anthracene rotor to turn. Tiny motors that are powered by light or magnetic fields have already been developed, but electricity carries advantages, says team member Jos Seldenthuis at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. (ACS Nano)

Taken from Education Week: “Obama Plays Cheerleading Role for STEM Education”

 

 

Amid a struggling economy, a raft of foreign-policy headaches, and the tail end of a heated campaign season, President Barack Obama carved out time in his schedule this month to watch students in the State Dining Room demonstrate a solar-powered model car, a water-purification system, and a soccer-playing robot. That might seem like a surprising distraction. But to hear the president tell it, those activities—part of what was dubbed the first annual White House science fair celebrating winners of STEM-focused student competitions—are just what the nation needs to prosper. “In many ways, our future depends on what happens in those contests,” Mr. Obama said at the event. “It’s in these pursuits that talents are discovered and passions are lit, and the future scientists, engineers, inventors, entrepreneurs are born.” The science fair was the fifth White House event he has personally hosted over the past year or so focused on education in the STEM subjects: science, technology, engineering, and mathematics… “He’s shaking these kids’ hands and congratulating them,” said James Brown, an assistant director of the American Chemical Society and the co-chairman of the Washington-based STEM Education Coalition. “There’s nothing better than the president being a role model for students to study science and technology.”

Taken from The Economist: “Plastics: There and back again”

 

 

Plastics were once regarded as wonder-materials. They are still ubiquitous, but find less favour than they used to because of the very stability and persistence that won them plaudits in the first place. Persistence is not a quality to be desired in something that gets thrown away, and so much plastic is used in packaging, and in articles that are disposable, that many people now see conventional petrochemical plastics as a nuisance and a threat. The search is on, then, for biodegradable alternatives. One possibility has recently been explored by David Schiraldi of Case Western Reserve University, in Ohio, and his colleagues. They propose to reach back into history and revive the use of a feedstock that was used to make some of the first plastics invented: milk. The researchers report in Biomacromolecules that their new material matches the stiffness, strength and compressibility of expanded polystyrene, a common packaging material that is the bane of many a rubbish dump. However, unlike polystyrene, it goes away once it has been dumped. An initial experiment suggested that 20% of it vanished within 18 days in a dump-like environment. A comedown, perhaps, from being a queen’s brooch. But far more useful.

Taken from R&D  Magazine: “Probing  the mysterious second-wave of damage in head injury  patients”

 

Why do some of the one million  people who sustain head injuries annually in United  States experience a mysterious second wave of  brain damage days after the initial injury - just when they appear to be  recovering? Limited clinical trials using an innovative new device to monitor  brain chemistry on a second-by-second basis are underway to answer that  life-and-death question, according to an article in the current issue of  Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), ACS' weekly newsmagazine. Brain injury is the leading cause of death  and disability worldwide. C&EN Senior Editor Celia Henry Arnaud describes a  phenomenon called depolarization, in which brain activity decreases in patients  following initial trauma. The condition involves a wave of chemical changes that  spread from the site of injury and inactivate nerve cells. Now in development at  Imperial College London, the new so-called "microfluidic method" measures  glucose quickly and continuously - in fractions of a second instead of hourly.  The device is currently being tested in patients who have suffered trauma,  stroke, or aneurysm (a balloon-like enlargement of a brain artery). In the  future, the device could be used in patients with milder forms of brain injury  and used in a way that is less invasive, the article  notes.

Taken from Softpedia: “Tobacco  and Nicotine – Good as Pesticides”

 

Nicotine is bad for you and  apparently it has the same poisonous effect on pests, getting scientists'  attention for a potential alternative to traditional commercial pesticides. For  hundreds of years now, tobacco leaves have been used on a small scale, as a  natural organic pesticide, and as the growing concerns about health risk related  to tobacco sales are harming tobacco farmers in some parts of the world,  scientists looked for a new way of using this plant. Dr Cedric Briens, Professor  of Chemical Engineering at the University of Western Ontario, and Director of  the Research and Development, of the Institute for Chemicals and Fuels from  Alternative Resources (ICFAR), and colleagues, thought of using tobacco as a  natural pesticide, due to its toxic content of nicotine. They explained that  tobacco leaves could be turned into pesticides by a process called pyrolysis,  which involves heating up the tobacco leaves at 900 degrees Fahrenheit (482.2  degrees Celsius) in a vacuum. The report was published in ACS' bi-weekly journal  Industrial & Engineering Chemistry  Research.

Taken from RedOrbit: “Small  Particles Show Big Promise In Beating Unpleasant  Odors”

 

Scientists are reporting development  of a new approach for dealing with offensive household and other odors — one  that doesn't simply mask odors like today's room fresheners, but eliminates them  at the source. Their research found that a deodorant made from nanoparticles —  hundreds of times smaller than peach fuzz — eliminates odors up to twice as  effectively as today's gold standard. A report on these next-generation  odor-fighters appears in ACS' Langmuir, a bi-weekly journal. Brij Moudgil  and colleagues note that consumers use a wide range of materials to battle  undesirable odors in clothing, on pets, in rooms, and elsewhere. Most common  household air fresheners, for instance, mask odors with pleasing fragrances but  do not eliminate the odors from the environment. People also apply deodorizing  substances that absorb smells. These materials include activated carbon and  baking soda. However, these substances tend to have only a weak ability to  absorb the chemicals responsible for the odor. The scientists describe  development of a new material consisting of nanoparticles of silica (the main  ingredient in beach sand) — each 1/50,000th the width of a human hair — coated  with copper. That metal has well-established antibacterial and anti-odor  properties, and the nanoparticles gave copper a greater surface area to exert  its effects.

Taken from Science  Daily: “Cone of  Poison: The Secret Behind the Cone Snail's Venom  Pump”

 

Scientists have discovered the  secret of how an amazing sea snail injects its venom after shooting a  harpoon-like tooth into its prey -- or some unlucky swimmer -- at jetliner  speeds. The creatures, called cone snails, use a highly specialized structure  that instantly pumps the paralyzing venom through the tooth and into its target.  Their study appears in ACS' monthly Journal  of Proteome Research. Helena Safavi-Hemami, Anthony Purcell and  colleagues note that cone snails live mainly in the shallows of the world's  tropical oceans. Prized by sea-shell collectors for their beautiful shells, the  snails are up to 9 inches long. The scientists' analysis of proteins in venom  bulbs found high concentrations of arginine kinase, a protein that enables squid  and scallops to swim away from danger with extreme speed. Its abundance in the  bulb suggests that arginine kinase enables the venom bulb to undergo rapid,  repeated contractions to quickly force the venom through the venom duct to the  harpoon and into the prey, the scientists say.

Taken from USA Today: “Is  flying or driving worse for climate change?”

 

Which is the bigger climate culprit  -- cars or planes? A new study finds that driving increases global temperatures  more in the longer term than making the same long-distance journey by air. Yet  in the first few years after the trip, flying increases global temperatures four  times more than driving. "As planes fly at high altitudes, their impact on ozone  and clouds is disproportionately high, though short lived. Although the exact  magnitude is uncertain, the net effect is a strong, short-term, temperature  increase," says lead author Jens Borken-Kleefeld of the International Institute  for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria. He says car travel emits  more carbon dioxide than air travel per passenger mile, bus since CO2 remains in  the atmosphere longer than the other gases, "cars have a more harmful impact on  climate change in the long term." The greenest option? The study, using climate  chemistry models, finds that passenger trains and buses cause four to five times  less global warming than car travel per passenger mile. It appears in the  American Chemical Society's Environmental  Science & Technology, a semiweekly  journal.

Times  of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.15  million)

“Some  green exercise for the mind”

October 27,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) podcast

 

[Oneindia (Bangalore, India: 7.3 million monthly unique users), RedOrbit (Dallas, Tex.: 3.4 million monthly unique users), Thaindian  News (Bangkok, Thailand: 2 million monthly unique users), PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.3 million monthly unique users), Genetic  Engineering & Biotechnology News (New Rochelle, N.Y.: bi-monthly  circulation 65,000) and e!  Science News (34,300 monthly unique users) also covered the  item.]

 

New research has suggested that just  five minutes of outdoor activity — such as exercising in a park, working in a  backyard garden or walking on a nature trail — is good for the brain, with  tangible benefits for mental health. It indicated that physical activity in  natural areas, known as 'green' exercise, could lead to improvements in mental  health. In the study, Jules Pretty and Jo Barton, Ph.D., of the University of Essex in the United Kingdom (U.K.), analyzed data on  the physical activities of 1,252 people of different ages, genders and mental  health status in the U.K. The scientists showed that just  five minutes of exercise in a green nature setting could boost mood and  self-esteem. The research appeared in a report in the ACS journal, Environmental Science & Technology (ES&T).

 

Topix.com (Palo Alto, Calif.: 10.7 million monthly unique  users)

“New  American Chemical Society Prized Science video focuses on a green  gasoline”

October 26,  2010

Origin: OPA  podcast

 

[Sourcews (20,000 monthly unique users), LocalSpur (Bloomfield, N.J.: 40,100 monthly unique users) and Science  Technology News also covered the story.]

 

Green gasoline is plants in your  tank, motor vehicle fuel made from corn, cornstalks, sugarcane, and other crops.  It also is gasoline made with recipes that reduce the need for harsh,  potentially toxic ingredients like hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid that are  used at about 210 oil refineries worldwide. Now scientists have found an answer  to a half-century quest for a way to make gasoline in exactly that kind of  greener, more environmentally-friendly way. That advance highlights the second  episode of a new video series, Prized  Science: How the Science Behind ACS Awards Impacts Your Life, from  the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. Rich with high-definition  graphics and animations, and commentary suitable for classroom use and other  audiences of students and non-scientists, the videos are available without  charge at the Prized Science website, YouTube, iTunes and on DVD. The new video features research by Vincent D'Amico, Emiel  van Broekhoven, Ph.D., and Juha Jakkula. They invented a new process for making  alkylate, a key ingredient in clean-burning gasoline. Alkylate has a high octane  rating and yet is low in sulfur, nitrogen, and substances that contribute to air  pollution.

 

Boston Globe (Boston, Mass.:  daily circulation 232,432)

“Materials  Scientists, Conservators Join Forces to Preserve Silver Artifacts and  Art”

October 26,  2010

 

Where there's silver, there's  tarnish. While getting the tarnish off your flatware might be an occasional  inconvenience, to museum curators and conservators, it's a threat to  irreplaceable works of art. To protect these objects for generations to come,  scientists from the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park,  have teamed up with conservators from the Walters Art  Museum in Baltimore, Md., to develop and test a new, high-tech way  to protect silver art objects and artifacts, using coatings that are mere  nanometers thick… The three-year project is one of the first to be funded by the  National Science Foundation's Chemistry and Materials Research at the Interface  between Science and Art (SCIART) grant program, which supports projects in the  field of cultural heritage science through the funding of collaborations among  conservation experts in museums and scientists in academia. The SCIART program  will be highlighted at the 2011 national meeting of the American Chemical Society, which has  invited the team to present their work.

 

Forbes (New York, N.Y.: 5 million monthly unique  users)

“Healthier,  Low-Emitting Built Classroom Environment to be Showcased at Greenbuild  2010”

October 26,  2010

 

A healthier, low-emitting, built  classroom environment will comprise the GREENGUARD Environmental Institute's  booth exhibit at Greenbuild 2010 next month, helping to raise awareness about  the importance of good indoor air quality in schools and the simple ways it can  be achieved… In addition to exhibiting at Greenbuild 2010, the GREENGUARD  Environmental Institute is participating in "Products Not Pollution," an  executive roundtable discussion on the role of sustainability in product design.  The roundtable will feature Dr. Marilyn Black, founder of the GREENGUARD  Environmental Institute; David Walker of Dyson; Kirsten Richie of Gensler;  Zorana Bosnic of HOK San Francisco; Vance Bell, CEO of Shaw Floors; and Bob Peoples of the ACS Green Chemistry Institute(R), who will  moderate.

 

Taiwan Today (Taipei, Taiwan)

“Taiwan  researchers develop flu detection chips”

October 27,  2010

 

Researchers at Academia Sinica have  successfully developed sugar chips capable of diagnosing influenza, Wu Chung-yi,  a research fellow at the institute, said Oct. 27. The technique will enable  rapid identification of the specific virus a person is affected with, such as  type A, type B or a new H1N1 strain, by applying infected saliva to the chip,  researchers said. Clinical methods of rapid identification currently in wide use  can only tell a patient whether the infection is type A or non-type A. “What’s  scary about the influenza virus is that they are the RNA type virus, which means  they mutate quickly,” Wu explained. “With this new chip, however, we can  establish a pattern for any new kind of flu rapidly, making the chip a valuable  tool in epidemic prevention.” The team’s findings have been published in the  Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American  Chemical Society.

 

Azonano.com (Sydney, Australia: 86,100 monthly unique  users)

“Tracking Tumor-Targeting  Nanoparticles in the Body”

October 26,  2010

 

Though targeted nanoparticle-based  imaging agents and therapeutics for diagnosing and treating cancer are making  their way to and through the clinical trials process, researchers still do not  have a good understanding of how nanoparticles reach tumors and how they then  bind to and enter the targeted tumor. To overcome that knowledge deficit, two  teams of investigators, both part of the Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer have  undertaken studies aiming to track nanoparticles as they move through living  animals. In one study, a team of investigators at Stanford University used quantum dots to study how  nanoparticles travel through tumor blood vessels in living test subjects, bind  to molecular targets on the surface of those blood vessels, and then travel out  of the blood stream and into the tumor itself. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, co-director  of one of nine National Cancer Institute (NCI) Centers of Cancer Nanotechnology  Excellence, led this study. He and his colleagues published their findings in  the journal Small. In a second study, published in the journal ACS Nano, Alliance investigators Dong Shin, Mostafa El-Sayed, and  Shuming Nie of Emory University and the Georgia Institute of  Technology used targeted gold nanocrystals to study both active and passive  targeting of tumors.

 

Outsourcery (Lancashire, U.K.)

“American  Chemical Society uses web conferencing to enhance  discussions”

October 26,  2010

 

Web conferencing was used by the  American Chemical Society in a  seminar last week to discuss ways in which chemists can make valuable  contributions to their local communities. The technology drew together some of  the leading experts of the field so that they could be a part of the discussions  from everywhere in the world. The event, a part of National Chemistry Week,  looked at businesses, schools and individuals and how chemistry affects quality  of life. Unified communications systems, such as web conferencing, are popular  with businesses looking to reduce travel costs but at the same time keeping  experts in touch to provide the best information across the globe. Earlier this  month, Bernard Golden, chief executive officer of HyperStratus, said that a  revolution is taking place in the price of web and video conferencing, making  the technology cheaper.

 

… From the  Blogs

 

Reactive  Chemistry

“Antioxidant  backlash”

October 27,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

More research is needed into  antioxidants found in plants, which may actually aggravate health conditions  rather than benefiting people who eat them. Specifically, quercetin and ferulic  acid have been shown to aggravate kidney cancer in severely diabetic laboratory  rats, according to a study in the Journal of  Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Suffice it to say  that taking antioxidant supplements whether derived from plants or not may not  necessarily be good for your health if you already have health  problems.

 

Physics  News

“New American Chemical Society  Prized Science video focuses on 'green  gasoline'”

October 26,  2010

Origin: OPA  podcast

 

Green gasoline is plants in your  tank, motor vehicle fuel made from corn, cornstalks, sugarcane, and other crops.  It also is gasoline made with recipes that reduce the need for harsh,  potentially toxic ingredients like hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid that are  used at about 210 oil refineries worldwide. Now scientists have found an answer  to a half-century quest for a way to make gasoline in exactly that kind of  greener, more environmentally-friendly way. That advance highlights the second  episode of Prized Science: How the Science  Behind ACS Awards Impacts Your Life, from the American Chemical  Society.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000)

“New American Chemical Society Prized Science video focuses on 'green gasoline'”

October 25, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) press release

 

[PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.3 million monthly unique users), FirstScience (London, England: 22,000 monthly unique users), e! Science News (34,300 monthly unique users), Hydrocarbon Online (Erie, Pa.) and Chem.info (Rockaway, N.J.) also covered the story.]

 

Green gasoline is plants in your tank, motor vehicle fuel made from corn, cornstalks, sugarcane, and other crops. It also is gasoline made with recipes that reduce the need for harsh, potentially toxic ingredients like hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid that are used at about 210 oil refineries worldwide. Now scientists have found an answer to a half-century quest for a way to make gasoline in exactly that kind of greener, more environmentally-friendly way. That advance highlights the second episode of a new video series, Prized Science: How the Science Behind ACS Awards Impacts Your Life, from the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. Rich with high-definition graphics and animations, and commentary suitable for classroom use and other audiences of students and non-scientists, the videos are available without charge at the Prized Science website, YouTube, iTunes and on DVD. The new video features research by Vincent D'Amico, Emiel van Broekhoven, Ph.D., and Juha Jakkula. They invented a new process for making alkylate, a key ingredient in clean-burning gasoline. Alkylate has a high octane rating and yet is low in sulfur, nitrogen, and substances that contribute to air pollution. The process reduces the need for use of potentially toxic substances, including up to 200-400 tanker-truck loads of sulfuric acid that a typical oil refinery would need to handle each month to make alkylate.

 

New York Times (New York, N.Y.: daily circulation 951,063)

“First Mention: Birth Control Pills, 1957”

October 25, 2010

 

Birth control pills — or at least the various attempts to develop them — were mentioned occasionally in The New York Times during the 1950s, but discussion of the possibility of a safe and effective oral contraceptive became heated in the summer of 1957. It was then that a medicine called Enovid was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of severe menstrual disorders. The Times neither reported the approval nor took note of Enovid’s already widely known side effect: contraception. Although the brand name was still not mentioned, knowledge of the availability of Enovid first came to readers of The Times on Nov. 21, 1957, in an account of a debate about “the new birth control pills” among three clergymen in Rochester. The pill was still legally unavailable as a contraceptive, but opinions about its use to prevent pregnancy were forcefully expressed by a Catholic priest, a rabbi and a Protestant minister. Then on June 8, 1958, under the headline “New Hormone Synthesized,” The Times reported on a paper in The Journal of the American Chemical Society describing the creation of a synthetic form of progesterone.

 

Dairy Reporter (Montpellier, France: 12,000 monthly unique users)

“Scientists create biogradable styrofoam from milk”

October 26, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

US scientists have used the protein in milk and clay to develop a new lightweight biodregradable styrofoam material which they claim could be a substitute for traditional foamed plastics. The research was led by David Schiraldi of Case Western Reserve  University who told DairyReporter.com: “This is a product option for companies looking for a green, biofriendly material. The process itself is also very friendly, in that the only effluent is water vapour.” The results of the study, recently published in Biomacromolecules, shows that a material produced using cows milk is both biodegradable and strong enough for commercial uses with almost a third of the material breaking down within 30 days. Although the scientists have previously published a study in Green Chemistry testing the material, Schiralidi said that this particular study shows how to increase the mechanical properties of the aerogel, demonstrating its biodegradability. The scientists claim that the new substance could be used in a range of products such as packaging, furniture cushions and insulation.

 

Azom.com (Sydney, Australia: 308,900 monthly unique users)

“Study Shows That Biopolymers are Polluters on the Path to Production”

October 25, 2010

 

An analysis of plant and petroleum-derived plastics by University of Pittsburgh researchers suggests that biopolymers are not necessarily better for the environment than their petroleum-based relatives, according to a report in Environmental Science & Technology. The Pitt team found that while biopolymers are the more eco-friendly material, traditional plastics can be less environmentally taxing to produce. Biopolymers trumped the other plastics for biodegradability, low toxicity, and use of renewable resources. Nonetheless, the farming and chemical processing needed to produce them can devour energy and dump fertilizers and pesticides into the environment, wrote lead author Michaelangelo Tabone (ENG, A&S '10), who conducted the analysis as an undergraduate student in the lab of Amy Landis, a professor of civil and environmental engineering in Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering.

 

North American Precis Syndicate (New York, N.Y.: 250,000 monthly unique users)

“Holiday dining: Healthful Eating For People Who Love Food”

October 25, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

It is possible to enjoy the holiday season without losing sight of your exercise and nutrition programs. By setting ground rules, you can enjoy holiday parties and celebrations without overdoing the food—or starving yourself. Consider these simple ideas: Don’t succumb to peer pressure. Water, water and more water. Constantly sipping on water is a great way to stay “full.” A couple of glasses before a meal can be a great way to keep a lid on food intake. In fact, a recent American Chemical Society presentation said drinking two glasses of water prior to a meal can produce greater weight loss than consuming the meal alone. Go for the veggies first. Besides being loaded with nutrients, the considerable fiber and water found in vegetables can help you avoid overeating. If you’re dining out, start with a salad. If you’re at a party, look for the vegetable tray.

 

The Bellingham Herald (Bellingham, Wash.: daily circulation 23,933)

“Olympia: Science Cafe to discuss bats Nov. 9 at Batdorf & Bronson”

October 26, 2010

 

Conservation issues for Pacific  Northwest bats will be the topic of discussion at the Science Cafe free public meeting at 7 p.m. Nov. 9 at the Batdorf & Bronson Coffee House, 516 Capitol Way S., Olympia. The guest speaker is bat researcher Greg Falxa from Cascadia Research Collective in Olympia. He will discuss the life history and challenges facing the region’s bat species, leaving time for questions from the audience. The informal monthly gathering to explore science and technology topics of interest is sponsored by the Puget Sound Chapter of the American Chemical Society.


… From the Blogs

 

ScienceBlog (New York, N.Y.: 162,700 monthly unique users)
“New American Chemical Society Prized Science video focuses on ‘green gasoline’”

October 25, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

Green gasoline is plants in your tank, motor vehicle fuel made from corn, cornstalks, sugarcane, and other crops. It also is gasoline made with recipes that reduce the need for harsh, potentially toxic ingredients like hydrofluoric acid or sulfuric acid that are used at about 210 oil refineries worldwide. Now scientists have found an answer to a half-century quest for a way to make gasoline in exactly that kind of greener, more environmentally-friendly way. That advance highlights the second episode of a new video series, Prized Science: How the Science Behind ACS Awards Impacts Your Life, from the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.

 

Natural Health News

“The Healthy Side of Maple Syrup”

October 25, 2010

 

Maple syrup can substantially slow the growth of cancerous cells in several cancers and help reduce the risk of diabetes, U.S. researchers found. Navindra Seeram of the University of Rhode Island found 13 new antioxidant compounds that were not known to exist in syrup until now. Several of these antioxidants newly identified in maple syrup are reported to have anti-cancer, anti-bacterial and anti-diabetic properties. Seeram presented his findings on Canadian maple syrup at the American Chemical Society annual meeting in San Francisco.

Oneindia (Bangalore, India: 7.3 million monthly unique users)

“Coming soon: Styrofoam made from cow's milk!”

October 25, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

You could soon be drinking out of Styrofoam cups made of milk, for scientists at Case  Western Reserve University have managed to create styrofoam packaging using a combination of clay and milk protein. David Schiraldi took the cow milk protein casein and strengthened it with a little bit of clay and glyceraldehyde, a triose monosaccharide. Schiraldi and his colleagues blended all three ingredients and freeze dried the mixture to make an aerogel that they then baked in the oven. According to the scientists, the cured, foamlike material is strong enough for commercial use and a third of it biodegraded within a month's time. It could even be used in insulation, packaging, furniture, and even cushions. Not to mention the cost savings if casein production gets scaled up for replacing existing styrofoam. The team published their results recently in the journal Biomacromolecules.

 

Medical News Today (U.K.: 1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Progress Toward Treating Infections By Silencing Microbes' 'Smart Phones'”

October 22, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

So disease-causing bacteria in the body finally have multiplied to the point where their numbers are large enough to cause illness. What's next? They get out their "smart phones" and whisper "Let's roll!" That's how an article in ACS' monthly Chemical Reviews describes the substances - "smart phones of the microbial world" - that bacteria use to transmit chemical signals that launch infections and monitor their environment. Their review of more than 60 years of research on 4-quinolones found promising indications that such a conversation-stopper will be developed. Scientists, for instance, now have evidence that a certain enzyme that modifies 4-quinolones can reduce infection. "These results are encouraging for the development of new therapeutics that target 4-quinolone signaling," the article noted.

 

The Times-Standard (Eureka, Calif.: daily circulation 23,000)

“Marcus: Health is top priority”

October 24, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Summer is over, the kids are back in school, vacations have become memories, and more folks are turning their attention to the task of “dropping those few extra pounds” before the holidays. It is such a widespread phenomenon that the weight loss industry refers to it as “the winter diet season.” Especially during these months, many well-intentioned (but misguided) individuals opt for what they think are “safe and natural” methods that will accelerate weight loss with minimal habit change. Researchers in Hong Kong analyzed 81 weight-loss products taken by patients who came in to the hospital for treatment for poisoning (one of whom had died). They discovered two or more pharmaceutical agents in 61 of the supplements, and two supplements contained six drugs. The authors caution their findings should not be interpreted as a full analysis of the weight-loss supplement market; yet, it bears noting that in the United States approximately $34 billion is spent annually on alternative medicine, including supplements. Many of these products, sometimes called “botanical supplements” or “herbal remedies,” are not well studied according to research published in Chemical & Engineering News. In some cases, they note, the ingredients could even be dangerous. Within the last two years, the FDA has alerted consumers about 72 weight-loss supplements containing such undeclared drugs.

 

Science News (Washington D.C.: bi-weekly circulation 130,000)

“Iron in the Mix”

November 6 2010 issue

 

Physicist Johnpierre Paglione works in a kitchen of sorts: He precisely blends ingredients, heats his mixtures to just the right temperature and cools them to get the perfect product. But rather than only edible ingredients, his recipes call for toxic chemicals, such as arsenic, and metals — especially iron. When the timer finally dings, out pops a silvery-black pebble with one flat, shiny surface. The newly made pebble is a superconductor, a material that shuttles electricity with essentially perfect efficiency, defying the resistance that typically slows electrons down. Because Paglione’s pebble incorporates iron into its molecular structure, it’s a member of a new class of materials known as iron-based superconductors… Then in 2008, Japanese scientists led by Hideo Hosono of the Tokyo Institute of Technology reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society that they had found an iron-arsenic mix that superconducted at 26 kelvins. Before long, scientists found related compounds working at temperatures up to 55 kelvins. The iron-based compounds could help reveal how superconductivity worked at relatively high temperatures, researchers thought. They immediately started creating more iron mixes and comparing the cuprates with the iron-based family in search of a common explanation.

 

Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.7 million monthly unique users)

“AFM Tips from the Microwave: Chemists Improve Process for Making Sharp Atomic Force Microscopy Tips”

October 21, 2010

 

Scientists from the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena (Germany) have improved a fabrication process for atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tips. Atomic force microscopy is able to scan surfaces so that even tiniest nano structures become visible. Knowledge about these structures is for instance important for the development of new materials and carrier systems for active substances. The size of the probe is highly important for the image quality as it limits the dimensions that can be visualized -- the smaller the probe, the smaller the structures that are revealed. Carbon nanotubes are supposed to be a superior material for the improvement of such scanning probes. However, it is difficult to attach them on scanning probes, which limits their practical use. Chemists of the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena found a way to overcome these problems. The research team of Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert succeeded in developing a new type of process that allows the growth of carbon nanotubes on the actual scanning probe. These innovative discoveries are published in the journal Nano Letters.

 

Examiner.com (Columbus, Ohio: 14.2 million monthly unique users)

“Uptown Westerville merchants to celebrate Halloween into wee hours, Oct. 29”

October 23, 2010

 

Fans of Ohio’s historic downtowns should enjoy “Midnight Madness” on Oct. 29 in Westerville. The stores along State Street in what’s known as “Uptown” Westerville will extend their hours until midnight for an event that celebrates the fall season. Some of the unique locally owned shops are located in buildings that date to the 1850s. Rogers says it will be best to bring children from 6-9 p.m., when kid-friendly activities will take place. The Otterbein  University American Chemical Society will present “Mad Science Experiments” beginning at 7 p.m. in the gazebo on E. College Avenue. “Kids love watching the student scientists perform weird experiments,” Rogers said. “They just stand there with their jaws dropped.” Other activities include horse-drawn carriage rides down State Street and a “Celebrity Ghost” 5K commemorating Hollywood stars of yesteryear beginning at 8:30 p.m.

 

Daytona Beach News-Journal (Dayton Beach,  Fla.: daily circulation 78,000)

“Professor's chemistry game catching on”

October 25, 2010

 

A Stetson  University professor's computer game designed to teach students about chemistry is catching on not only at the university, but nationally. Tandy Grubbs spent two months designing the game, Chemical Mahjong, that Stetson students started using in classes in September. The game is inspired by, mahjongg, a solitaire game popular in the late 1980s and 1990s that uses various tiles and Chinese symbols. Grubbs' game has various versions including one that matches element names to their chemical symbols. The goal of the game, Chemical Mahjong, is to eliminate all the tiles "as quickly as you can" while also learning. People can play the games for free at www.mahjongchem.org, which has already seen about 6,000 hits since September, the majority in the last few weeks and most outside Florida, including other countries. The National Science Teachers Association is promoting the new chemistry version of the game through its website and plans to run a piece in its publication. The American Chemical Society - Division of Chemical Education has notified Grubbs that it plans to put the link to the game on its website soon.

 

The Ledger (Lakeland, Fla.: daily circulation 65,900)

“Lots to Do on This Beautiful Day in Polk County”

October 23, 2010

 

This weekend is so full of festivals, there's no way you can make it to even a fraction of them. Other entertainment events include music, a German film and hydroplane boat races… EXPLORATIONS V, CHILDREN'S MUSEUM in Lakeland presents a Celebrate Chemistry event today from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Celebrate Chemistry with members of Florida Southern College's American Chemical Society Student Chapter. Included with regular museum admission.

 

… Broadcast News

 

KMSP-MIN (Minneapolis, Minn.: local audience 39,579)

“National Chemistry Week at Minneapolis library”

October 23, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Celebrate National Chemistry Week at the Minneapolis Center Library with hands-on activity. Kids and parents get an idea for how chemistry is everywhere and how it impacts your life. It runs from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m.

 

WWNY-TV (Watertown, N.Y.: local audience 29,172)

“National Chemistry Week at Jefferson Community College”

October 22, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Chemistry is the science of matter and the changes it undergoes during chemical reactions. These chemical reactions were produced by students at Jefferson  Community College. Whether it's an exploding balloon, an ammonia fountain or toothpaste for a giant, these experiments were designed to teach and excite: even J.C.C. president Dr. Carole McCoy was studying the interactions of chemical substances.

 

WSYT-TV (Syracuse, N.Y.: local audience 15,297)

“Learn how science is used in movies for National Chemistry Week”

October 23, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

[WPBS-TV (Watertown, N.Y.: local audience 29,172) also covered the story.]

 

Central New York got an up close look at how science is used in movies. The free event at East  Syracuse Minoa  High School celebrated National Chemistry Week and Mole Day. Some teachers and kids even dressed up like their favorite movie character--including Harry Potter.

 

WETM-TV (Elmira, N.Y.: local audience 10,243)

“National Chemistry Week in Elmira”

October 25, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

The young people in our area can see a future for themselves here and know it'd be a great way to make a living so we can keep some of the talent in our own neighborhood. The museum partnered with National Chemistry Week and the Finger Lakes Science and Engineering Festival for the event.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Nano News

“Professor's research on graphene shares connection with Nobel Laureates”

October 25, 2010

 

When two scientists were recently awarded the Nobel Prize for physics for their work with graphene, a Kansas State  University professor was thrilled with the recognition of the new two-dimensional material. Vikas Berry, assistant professor of chemical engineering, has spent three years researching graphene, a form of carbon that is only one atom thick. Berry and Kabeer Jasuja, a K-State doctoral student in chemical engineering, India, recently researched gold ions and graphene under microwaves. They used a kitchen microwave oven to attach gold nanoparticles to graphene-oxide. The graphene-oxide acted as a stabilizing and supporting agent for the naked gold particles, which then showed strong catalytic activity. Their work appeared in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters in June.

 

Green Car Congress

“Life cycle study calculates Algenol’s algae-to-ethanol process can deliver 67% to 87% reduction in carbon footprint compared to gasoline”

October 25, 2010

 

Algenol Biofuels’ Direct to Ethanol technology is based on an intracellular photosynthetic process in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) that produces ethanol that is excreted through the cell walls, collected from closed photobioreactors as a dilute ethanol-in-water solution, and purified to fuel grade ethanol. A team from Algenol and Georgia Tech calculated the life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions for three different system scenarios for this proposed ethanol production process, using process simulations and thermodynamic calculations. They found that, on a life cycle basis in comparison to gasoline, the direct to ethanol technology can provide a 67% to 87% reduction in carbon footprint on an energy equivalent basis for initial ethanol concentrations (given in weight percent) ranging from 0.5% to 5%. Their work was published as an open access paper in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology on 22 Oct.

 

 

 

The  Economist (London, England: weekly circulation 1.6  million)

“Clean  water: Silver threads of life”

October 21,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

More than a billion people lack  clean water—and in most cases the lack is just of cleanliness, rather than of  the water itself. The result is disease, particularly diarrhoea. This kills  millions of children a year and stunts the growth of millions more. Better water  filters, then, could save many lives and improve many others, and Yi Cui of  Stanford  University thinks he has  come up with one. Traditional filters work by forcing water through pores to  weed out bacteria. That needs power, as well as frequent changes of the filter  element as the pores fill up with bugs. Dr. Cui’s filter, though, does not  screen the bacteria out. It kills them. As they report in the latest edition of  Nano Letters, Dr Cui and his team  found that when the filter was operated at -20 volts it killed 89% of the  bacteria and that at +20 volts it killed 77%. At zero volts, most of the  bacteria survived. In a follow-up experiment, in which contaminated water was  run through three of the new filters in sequence, 98% of the bacteria were  killed.

 

Discovery  News (Silver Spring, Md.: 10.1 million monthly unique  users)

“Biodegradable  Styrofoam Made From Milk”

October 21,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Sorry vegans. Chances are that in  the future we'll be getting dairy shipments. Scientists at Case Western Reserve University have whipped up an alternative  to insidious petroleum-derived styrofoam packaging using a combination of clay  and milk protein. The scientists, led by macromolecular science and engineering  professor David Schiraldi, took the cow milk protein casein and strengthened it  with a little bit of clay and glyceraldehyde, a triose monosaccharide. Casein is  already a pretty popular substance for adhesives, but it's water soluble. Not  ideal for packaging. Schiraldi and his colleagues blended all three ingredients  and freeze dried the mixture to make an aerogel that they then baked in the  oven. According to the scientists, the cured, foamlike material is strong enough  for commercial use and a third of it biodegraded within a month's time. They  published their results recently in the journal Biomacromolecules. The university reports  that the material has potential uses in insulation, packaging, furniture, and  even cushions.

 

Oneindia (Bangalore, India. 7.3  million monthly unique users)

“Coming  soon: Stronger, more durable plastic consumer  products”

October 21,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Long awaited advances in reducing  the cost of certain catalysts - substances that kick-start chemical reactions -  have led to production of super-strong forms of the world's most widely used  plastics. These upgraded forms of polyethylene have led to availability of  stronger, more durable consumer products ranging from garbage bags to camping  cookware. C&EN Senior Editor Alexander Tullo notes that the catalysts,  called "metallocenes," engendered excitement years ago because they allowed  production of stronger forms of polyethylene plastics. The world's most widely  used plastic - polyethylene is a mainstay in plastic shopping bags and other  items. However, hopes that metallocene plastics would replace conventional  polyethylene plastics faded because of the high costs of these catalysts. The  article describes a revival in the use of metallocenes and expanded marketing of  super-strong polyethylene plastics. The story appeared on the cover story of the  current issue of Chemical and Engineering  News (C&EN), ACS' weekly  newsmagazine.

 

Science  Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.7 million monthly unique  users)

“Progress  Toward Treating Infections by Silencing Microbes' 'Smart  Phones'”

October 20,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

[The  Medical News (Sydney, Australia: 544,000 monthly unique users), PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.3 million monthly unique users) and R&D  Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000) also covered the  story.]

 

So disease-causing bacteria in the  body finally have multiplied to the point where their numbers are large enough  to cause illness. What's next? They get out their "smart phones" and whisper  "Let's roll!" That's how an article in ACS' monthly Chemical Reviews describes the substances  -- "smart phones of the microbial world" -- that bacteria use to transmit  chemical signals that launch infections and monitor their environment. The  authors describe progress toward understanding and blocking this biochemical  chitchat, a development that could lead to new treatments for the growing  problem of antibiotic-resistant infections. Marvin Whiteley and Holly Huse point  out that bacteria use chemical signals to communicate with each other. Their  review of more than 60 years of research on 4-quinolones found promising  indications that such a conversation-stopper will be developed. Scientists, for  instance, now have evidence that a certain enzyme that modifies 4-quinolones can  reduce infection.

 

United  Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.1 million monthly unique  users)

“Inflammation  fighter: Black rice bran”

October 22,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

[DailyIndia.com (Jacksonville, Fla.:  150,000 unique monthly users), the St.  Louis Globe-Democrat (St.  Louis, Mo.: 53,400  monthly unique users) and EcoWorld (38,800 monthly unique users) also carried the  story.]

 

Black rice bran may help fight  disease-related inflammation, U.S. and South Korean researchers  say. Mendel Friedman of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural  Research Service in Albany, Calif., and Sun Phil Choi of Ajou University in  Suwon, South Korea, and colleagues report animal study evidence that  demonstrates a little-known variety of rice may soothe the inflammation that  characterize allergies, asthma and other diseases. The study, published in the  Journal of Agricultural and Food  Chemistry, found black rice bran extract reduced skin inflammation in  laboratory mice by 32 percent versus control animals. It also reduces production  of inflammation-promoting substances. The researchers noted brown rice bran did  not have the same effects.

 

R&D  Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly  circulation 80,000)

“American  Chemical Society to host public interest forum on science in public policy on  Oct. 27”

October 21,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

The American Chemical Society (ACS), a member  of Professionals for the Public Interest (PftPI), has organized a forum on "The  Appropriate Use of Science in Public Policy." It will be held on Oct. 27 in the  auditorium of the American Association for the Advancement of Science,  1200 New York Avenue,  NW, in Washington, D.C. The presentation and discussion will be  from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., followed by a reception. The federal government relies  on scientific studies to craft regulations intended to protect the health and  safety of American workers, the general public, and the environment. The forum  will explore ways to improve the process, to ensure utilization of the widest  possible range of knowledge and expertise, avoid conflicts of interest and  inappropriate influence, and ensure that science helps craft public  policy.

 

RedOrbit (Dallas, Tex.: 3.9 million monthly unique  users)

“Smaller  Is Better In The Viscous Zone”

October 22,  2010

 

Being the right size and existing in  the limbo between a solid and a liquid state appear to be the secrets to  improving the efficiency of chemical catalysts that can create better  nanoparticles or more efficient energy sources. When matter is in this  transitional state, a catalyst can achieve its utmost potential with the right  combination of catalyst particle size and temperature, according to a pair of  Duke  University researchers. A  catalyst is an agent or chemical that facilitates a chemical reaction. It is  estimated that more than 90 percent of chemical processes used by industry  involve catalysts at some point. This finding could have broad implications in  almost every catalyst-based reaction, according to an engineer and a chemist at  Duke who reported their findings on line in the American Chemical Society's  journal ACS Nano. The team found  that the surface-to-volume ratio of the catalyst particle – its size -- is more  important than generally appreciated. "We found that the smaller size of a  catalyst will lead to a faster reaction than if the bulk, or larger, version of  the same catalyst is used," said Stefano Curtarolo, associate professor in the  Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials  Sciences.

 

MinnPost (Minneapolis, Minn.: 176,000 monthly unique  users)

“Local  science events for families and kids”

October 22,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Kids and their parents are invited  to help kick off National Chemistry  Week this Saturday when volunteers from the Minnesota Section of the American Chemical  Society will stage hands-on chemistry activities. Whole groups —  scout troops, teachers with students and kids’ clubs — are welcome too. And  everyone will get a chance to earn free prizes. This year’s theme, “Behind the  Scenes with Chemistry,” highlights the fact that we are surrounded by chemistry  in our everyday lives whether we know it or not. Chemistry often is tucked  behind the scenes. For example, many of the special effects in movies and on  stage are not “magic,” but rather rely on common chemical concepts. When it  comes to Harry Potter, though, the presence of chemistry isn’t even subtle. In  that spirit, Saturday’s event will feature a special appearance by Professor  Sepoc (aka Jane Snell Copes) with experiments from "Harry Potter". The event,  free and open to the public, is set for 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 23,  at the Minneapolis Central Public Library, 300 Nicollet  Mall.

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen,  Va.: 1.3  million monthly unique users)

“Plant-based  plastics not necessarily greener than oil-based  relatives”

October 21,  2010

 

An analysis of plant and  petroleum-derived plastics by University of Pittsburgh researchers suggests that  biopolymers are not necessarily better for the environment than their  petroleum-based relatives, according to a report in Environmental Science & Technology. The  Pitt team found that while biopolymers are the more eco-friendly material,  traditional plastics can be less environmentally taxing to produce. The  researchers examined 12 plastics—seven petroleum-based polymers, four  biopolymers, and one hybrid. The team first performed a life-cycle assessment  (LCA) on each polymer's preproduction stage to gauge the environmental and  health effects of the energy, raw materials, and chemicals used to create one  ounce of plastic pellets. They then checked each plastic in its finished form  against principles of green design, including biodegradability, energy  efficiency, wastefulness, and toxicity.

 

San  Angelo Standard-Times (San Angelo, Tex.: daily circulation  26,271)

“Chemical  Society honors ASU group”

October 21,  2010

 

Angelo  State University’s student-affiliate  chapter of the American Chemical  Society has received an honorable mention award from the national ACS  for its activities during the 2009-10 academic year. This marks the fifth  straight year the ASU chapter has received a year-end award from the national  ACS. The list of award-winning chapters will be published in the Chemical & Engineering News magazine  and in Chemistry, the ACS student member magazine. The ASU chapter was  recognized for its participation in chemistry outreach activities, attendance at  national meetings and fundraising and social events. Chapter members annually  take part in ASU Science Days, Mole Day, Earth Day and National Chemistry Week activities and host  a Spring “Green” Chemistry Symposium on the ASU campus. They also conduct a  campus speaker program, have burrito sales for fundraising and include local and  area high school students in their activities. Members present their research at  organizational meetings, including the national ACS and Texas Academy of  Science.

 

… Broadcast  News

 

WIAT-BIRM (Birmingham, Ala.: national audience  903,114)

“National  Chemistry Week from U.A.B.”

October 22,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

In this week' s Kalee Challenge, we  put some high school students to the test. And speaking of a test, we're getting  ready for chemistry class. It's National  Chemistry Week everyone. Rick Jackson here live from UAB where they  have some amazing things planned for this weekend. Those details, after the  break. Chemistry is everywhere, whether it's a science fair project, or behind  the scenes of a movie set. Some local college students are celebrating the  science through National Chemistry Week.

 

… From the  Blogs

 

EmpowHER

“How  Your Curves Affect Your Health”

October 21,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

A friend of mine, Jill, often  comments on how everything she eats goes straight to her belly and then holds  out there indefinitely. She has tried every diet and exercise known to mankind  and still can’t seem to get rid of her mid-section blues. According to new  scientific research, fat tissue stored in the belly region “is an active organ  that sends chemical signals to other parts of the body that contributes to  chronic illnesses.” Scientists at Maastricht University in The Netherlands reported in  Journal of Proteome Research they  discovered 20 new hormones and substances not previously known to be secreted  into the body by human fats cells. The researchers say this discovery is  verification that fat secretes dozens of chemical messengers all around the  body.

 

Science  News

“ACS  Webinars focus on chemists in the community during National Chemistry  Week”

October 21,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

News media and others interested in  the chemical sciences are invited to join the next in a series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars  focusing on ways chemists can make valuable contributions to their communities.  Scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 21, from 2 - 3 p.m. EDT, the free ACS Webinars will  feature Al Hazari, Ph.D., of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, speaking on Sparking Discovery -  Chemists in the Community. The new webinar takes place during National  Chemistry Week, a community-based annual event that unites ACS  local sections, businesses, schools, and individuals in communicating the  importance of chemistry to our quality of life.

Examiner.com (Sacramento, Calif.: 14.5 million monthly unique users)

“How black rice bran may help fight inflammation, allergies, and asthma: study”

October 20, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

[Twenty-three media outlets, including All Voices (San Francisco, Calif.: 7.8 million monthly unique users), All Headline News (West Palm Beach, Fla.: 175,400 monthly unique users) and Health Jockey (Kalyan, India: 26,000 monthly unique users), also covered the item.]

 

According to an October 20, 2010 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, black rice bran may cut inflammation. See the article, "Black rice bran may help fight disease-related inflammation." UC Davis in the Sacramento-Davis regional area also researches rice. Black Japonica rice grains have a thick bran layer that is black or mahogany in color. The grains are sweet, nutty and musky in flavor and chewy, with a moist, crunchy texture. Best uses for black rice are for salads, soups, stuffings, and casseroles. Scientists are reporting evidence that black rice — a little-known variety of the grain that is the staple food for one-third of the world population — may help soothe the inflammation involved in allergies, asthma, and other diseases.

 

TG Daily (Culver City, Calif.: 548,700 monthly unique users)

“Cars worse than planes for global temperatures”

October 21, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Driving a car helps hike global temperatures in the long run more than making the same long-distance journey by air, the American Chemical Society says. However, in the short run, travelling by air is worse, because planes strongly affect short-lived warming processes at high altitudes. The answer seems to be to take the bus or train, as this causes a quarter the impact of automobile travel for every mile a passenger travels. Jens Borken-Kleefeld and his ACS colleagues used a suite of climate chemistry models to consider the climate effects of all long- and short-lived gases, aerosols and cloud effects resulting from transport worldwide. They concluded that in the long run the global temperature increase from a car trip will be on average higher than from a plane journey of the same distance. However, for the first few years after the journey, air travel increases global temperatures four times more than car travel.

 

Thaindian News (Bangkok, Thailand: 2 million monthly unique users)

“Now plastic from milk protein and clay”

October 21, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

[Twelve other media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000) and MSN India (Bangalore, India), also carried the story.]

 

Scientists have reported development of a new ultra-light bio-degradable foam plastic material made from two unlikely ingredients — the protein in milk and ordinary clay. The American Chemical Society (ACS) said the news comes amid ongoing concern about plastic waste accumulating in municipal landfills causing environmental pollution, and reliance on imported oil to make plastics. The new lighter-than-a-feather plastic could become a new bio-degradable substitute for Styrofoam - which is a trademark of Dow Chemical Company for polystyrene foam, the ACS said in a press release Wednesday. David Schiraldi of Case  Western Reserve University and co-workers reported the discovery in “Biomacromolecules”, a monthly journal published by the ACS. “The new environment friendly substance could be used in furniture cushions, insulation, packaging and other products,” the ACS said.

 

Forbes.com (New York, N.Y.: 5 million monthly unique users)

“Rhodia Connects Classrooms to Chemistry During National Chemistry Week”

October 21, 2010

 

Rhodia research chemists will conduct a series of Chemistry Connection(R) science education programs that bring chemistry to life--especially in the home--for students in Rhodia's North American manufacturing communities. The scientists are visiting schools near the company's research laboratories in Bristol, Pennsylvania and to schools south of Chicago to celebrate National Chemistry Week, Oct. 17-23. In these community schools, nearly 750 children will discover the magic of chemistry and its everyday applications through Chemistry Connection(R), Rhodia's award-winning program offered by volunteer scientists from local Rhodia facilities. "Encouraging elementary- and middle-school students to explore the sciences is absolutely essential for developing the next generation of laboratory researchers," according to Dr. John Cherkauskas, director of Rhodia's Center for Research & Technology in Bristol.

 

Zimbio (San Carlos, Calif.: 19.8 million monthly unique users)

“Ecoslim reviews Beat Cancer By the Foods You Eat”

October 20, 2010

 

In a first to investigate the acai berry, the University of Florida found in a recent study that the fruit contained enough antioxidants to destroy human cancer cells. This study showed that acai berry triggered a self-destruct response in up to 86 percent of the leukemia cells tested according to the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry where the results were published. An abundant source of antioxidants which fight and prevent harmful acai from entering the body can be found in the acai berry. This research has strengthened the hypothesis that adding an acai berry extract can be very beneficial to the human body. The study also noted that it is not intended to show that leukemic can be cured in humans with the acai berry elements.

 

Azom.com (Sydney, Australia: 325,300 monthly unique users)

“Revival of Metallocene Catalysts Promote Production of New Plastics”

October 21, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Long-awaited advances in reducing the cost of certain catalysts — substances that kick-start chemical reactions — have quietly led to production of super-strong forms of the world's most widely used plastics, according to the cover story of the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), ACS' weekly newsmagazine. These upgraded forms of polyethylene have led to availability of stronger, more durable consumer products ranging from garbage bags to camping cookware. The article describes a revival in the use of metallocenes and expanded marketing of super-strong polyethylene plastics. The reason: New technologies have cut the catalysts' cost and fostered production of millions of tons of the new plastics. They are found in products such as stronger garbage bags, improved packaging materials, more durable fuel tanks, and tougher artificial turf for football and soccer fields.

 

Erie Times-News (Erie, Pa.: daily circulation 56,124)

“Potpourri”

October 21, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

National Chemistry Week: "Behind the scenes with Chemistry!" -- presented by American Chemical Society with students and faculty from Penn State Behrend, Allegheny College, Edinboro University, Gannon University, Mercyhurst College and University of Pittsburgh at Titusville.

 

The Daily Herald (Provo, Utah: daily circulation 32,000)

“Magic in chemistry”

October 21, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

The chemical magic show is part of BYU's own celebration of National Chemistry Week which the university has titled "Behind the Scenes with Chemistry." The show is free and open to the public. Other activities include a lecture series and research poster session, but the excitement of the magic show certainly draws a fascinated crowd. "I don't exactly know what to expect when I'm doing it, it's different every time," said presenter Roger Harrison, a professor of chemistry at BYU, who admits he's sometimes as surprised as the audience when demonstrating an experiment. Events run through Oct. 23. The magic show can be seen at the Ezra Taft Benson Building at 7 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. today and Friday.

 

Jackson Hole News & Guide (Jackson, Wyoming: weekly circulation 10,500)

“Has to be better than a martini with veggies”

October 20, 2010

 

It’d probably take the National Security Agency or equivalent to discover how many books of which genres are being published in the United States each year. Admittedly, it’s a difficult task: There is traditional book publishing, on-demand publishing, self-publishing, plus all sorts of categories of titles from A to Z, from novels to texts to how-tos to privately printed poetry and memoirs…And so we have finally arrived at my inspiration for this column. It’s a quote from a review of the new book “Your Brain on Food: How Chemicals Control Your Thoughts and Feelings,” by Gary L. Wenk, Oxford University Press, 2010. The review by Leigh Boerner in Chemical & Engineering News in September is excellent, making it clear that the book is essentially an introduction to neuroscience and covers topics from stimulants, depressants, euphoria and depression to magic and madness. Spicing up his review, Boerner picks out one grabber in the book that alone makes a prospective reader want to march down to his or her bookstore. Wenk writes, “The drug asarone, which comes from a plant, acorus calamus (found in Asia, Europe and North America), is chemically very similar to mescaline.”

 

… Broadcast News

 

WTOL-TV (Toledo, Ohio: local audience 65,434)

“Chemistry helps explain special effects in movies”

October 20, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Thanks to chemistry, kids can learn about movie makeup, face wounds, slippery slime, and more. "It's talking about how all of the special effects that you put together or that movie creators put together, how those are actually not necessarily magical, but they're more chemistry." The exhibit is part of National Chemistry Week.

 

WDBD-TV (Jackson, Miss.: local audience 3,222)

“National Chemistry Week at Hinds Community College”

October 20, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Some Raymond Elementary students also took a trip to Hinds Community   College today for some hands on learning. Fourth and fifth graders visited the college's chemistry labs this afternoon to perform experiments. It's all part of National Chemistry Week. The kids will also get the chance to go back tomorrow to finish their chemistry concoctions.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Wired Magazine’s GeekDad

“Experimenting With Chemistry of Fall Colors for National Chemistry Week”

October 20, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Here in my corner of North  America the fall colors have finally started to emerge. And as I was admiring the reds, oranges, and yellows of the mountains surrounding my area, I was reminded of a cool experiment the kids and I did a couple years ago when we were studying chemistry. This week is also National Chemistry Week, so it’s a perfect time for trying a little chemistry at home. What we did was take the organic solvent acetone — also known as nail polish remover — and use it to analyze the chemical composition of leaves from a variety of trees in our yard using a process called paper chromatography.

 

NSDL

“Teaching History of Chemistry in National Chemistry Week, October 17-23, 2010”

October 20, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Chemistry, what a fascinating science discipline!  Isaac Newton, one the greatest scientists in history said in 1676: “If I have seen far, it’s because I stood on the shoulders of giants“.  And you bet that’s true for Chemistry, and for any other discipline as well… You can find more examples of scientists’ great ethnic and gender diversity in the ChemEd DL Pathway resource: Biographical Snapshots of Famous Women and Minority Chemists, and a collection of seminal original papers and interesting curiosities in the history of Chemistry in the Selected Classic Papers database from our BEN Pathway.

MSN Health & Fitness (New York, N.Y.: 1.5 million monthly unique users)

“Good News About Coffee”

October 19, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

Coffee lovers may be raising their cups—and perhaps eyebrows—at the recent news in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that the drink contains soluble fiber, the type that can help lower cholesterol. With about 1 gram per cup, coffee's fiber impact is modest. But the report is the latest in a growing stream of positive news about coffee. Some of the most promising findings come from studies of diabetes. When Harvard researchers combined data from nine studies involving more than 193,000 people, they found that regular coffee drinkers had a significantly lower risk of type 2 diabetes than those who abstained. The more they drank, the lower their risk. How coffee might work isn't clear; the studies weren't designed to identify cause-and-effect relationships. Antioxidants, such as chlorogenic acid (related to polyphenols in grapes), are likely players: coffee has more of them per serving than blueberries do, making it the top source of antioxidants in our diets. Antioxidants help quell inflammation, which might explain coffee's effect in inflammation-related diseases like diabetes and heart disease. Magnesium in coffee might help make cells more sensitive to insulin.

 

Natural News (Toronto, Ontario: 300,580 monthly unique users)

“No more formaldehyde fumes: researchers create a toxin-free wood adhesive from soy”

October 19, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

Although many products widely used today -- including furniture, flooring and cabinets -- look as if they are made of solid wood, they are actually manufactured from composites consisting of wood pieces bonded together with petroleum-based adhesives. Unfortunately, these adhesives are usually loaded with the toxic chemical formaldehyde. In fact, if you've ever walked into a new house or furniture store and felt your eyes and throat burn, your discomfort was most likely due to formaldehyde vapors emitted from composite wood materials. And not only can exposure to the formaldehyde fumes in these products cause respiratory, eye, nose and throat irritation, but the Environmental Protection Agency warns it may cause lung, nasopharyngeal and other cancers, too. However, here's good news: toxic, indoor air polluting composite wood products may soon be a thing of the past. At the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston, researchers have just announced they've come up with a breakthrough that should have consumers breathing easier. By using a natural compound found in tofu and soy milk to make a safe wood adhesive, they've found a way to make composite products without toxic formaldehyde. A team of scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin, told the ACS meeting how they've developed a soy-based green alternative to current wood adhesives which are made from petroleum.

 

Technology Review (Cambridge, Mass.: bi-monthly circulation 315,000)

“Bendable Memory Made from Nanowire Transistors”

October 20, 2010

 

Researchers in the U.K. have made a new kind of nanoscale memory component that could someday be used to pack more data into gadgets. The device stores bits of information using the conductance of nanoscale transistors made from zinc oxide. The researchers published a paper about a prototype memory device fabricated on a rigid silicon substrate last week in the online version of the journal Nano Letters. They are now testing flexible memory devices in the laboratory, says Jung Inn Sohn, a researcher at the University of Cambridge Nanoscience Center and lead author of the Nano Letters paper. The nanowire device stores data electrically and is nonvolatile, meaning it retains data when the power is turned off, like the silicon-based flash memory found in smart phones and memory cards. The new memory cannot hold data for as long as flash, and it is slower and has fewer rewrite cycles, but it could potentially be made smaller and packed together more densely.

 

Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.7 million monthly unique users)

“Sniffing out Shoe Bombs: A New and Simple Sensor for Explosive Chemicals”

October 19, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

University of Illinois chemists have developed a simple sensor to detect an explosive used in shoe bombs. It could lead to inexpensive, easy-to-use devices for luggage and passenger screening at airports and elsewhere. Triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is a high-powered explosive that in recent years has been used in several bombing attempts. TATP is easy to prepare from readily available components and has been difficult to detect. It defies most standard methods of chemical sensing: It doesn't fluoresce, absorb ultraviolet light or readily ionize. Kenneth Suslick, the Schmidt Professor of Chemistry at the U. of I., and postdoctoral researcher Hengwei Lin have developed a colorimetric sensor array that can quantitatively detect even very low levels of TATP vapor -- down to a mere 2 parts per billion. They wrote about their findings in an article published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 103,100 monthly unique users)

“Celebration reunites nanotechnology pioneers”

October 19, 2010

 

One simple conversation may have spread the legend of the buckyball farther and wider than the nearly quarter-century of learning and teaching that preceded it. Sir Harry Kroto, a member of the Nobel Prize-winning carbon-60 discovery team that reunited at Rice University this week, said his chat with an acquaintance at Google turned the world on to buckminsterfullerenes in a way that nothing else ever had. "A year and half ago, I met someone from Google, and said, 'Why not put the 25th anniversary of the buckyball discovery on the Google doodle page?'" Kroto told a high school science teacher who sought advice on inspiring students. When an animated buckyball appeared on the Google home page in early September, Kroto said one correspondent estimated "more people learned about buckyballs on that one day than in the 25 years the research has been carried on … because they were clicking on that thing. The discussion that kicked off the annual T.T. Chao Symposium on Innovation, which opened the Buckyball Discovery Conference, was one of many great moments during the Week of Nano. The conference included lunchtime addresses by Texas Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchinson and Ray Johnson, chief technology officer of Year of Nano sponsor Lockheed Martin; the National Historic Chemical Landmark presentation with Mayor Annise Parker '78 and Joe Francisco, president of the American Chemical Society; talks by Kroto and Curl as part of the Baker Institute for Public Policy's Civic Scientist lecture series; and a parade of the world's top nanotechnology experts.

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.2 million monthly unique users)

“Water's choice: A tale of two numbers and the order they predict”

October 19, 2010

 

Well-ordered structure or chaotic jumble? That's the choice when water is mixed with a salt and cooled down. Now, thanks to a rule discovered by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Technical University of Munich, predicting the structure of a frozen mixture of various salts and water is as easy as comparing just two numbers. The rule, simply put, compares two numbers. The first is the amount of energy that is released when a particular salt is dissolved in water. The second number is the amount of energy it takes to melt ice into regular water. If the first number is smaller than the second, a highly structured hydrate forms. Otherwise, salt and water won't mix together, but will be separated in their ordered forms. "We tested the rule against 75 different types of salts, which was everything we could find in the literature," said Dr. Sotiris Xantheas, a theoretical chemist at PNNL. "And it correctly predicted the outcome each time, as verified by laser experiments." (The Journal of Physical Chemistry A)

 

Central Michigan Life (Mount Pleasant, Mich.: daily circulation 13,500)

“Formula for National Chemistry Week’s ‘Behind the Scenes’ theme includes several events”

October 19, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Erynn Hill wants students and the Mount Pleasant community to know the importance of chemistry in their everyday lives. As president of the American Chemical  Society Central  Michigan University chapter, her organization hopes to promote chemistry particularly during this week’s National Chemistry Week. “With the theme of ‘Behind the Scenes with Chemistry,’ we are focusing on the chemistry that people may see every day in the movies or television shows they watch,” the Fowlerville junior said. “There is more to it than just a special effect, but it is a common chemical reaction.” There are several on-campus events celebrating National Chemistry Week taking place through Sunday.

 

The Gleaner (Henderson, Ky.: daily circulation 10,200)

“Chemistry Day coming Sunday at Evansville museum”

October 19, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

The 20th annual Chemistry Day event is coming up on Sunday at the Evansville Museum of Arts, History & Science. The University of Southern Indiana is a partner in the event, which is an observance of National Chemistry Week. At 1 p.m., Marilyn Hurst, USI professor of chemistry, will conduct experiments called Exploding Balloons, Elephant Toothpaste, Genie in a Bottle and Burning Water. Following the show, USI students will offer hands-on children's activities. The event will conclude at 3 p.m.

 

TCU Daily Skiff (Fort Worth, Tex.)

“Club celebrates science with Chemistry Week”

October 18, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

The university's Chemistry Club is bringing the American Chemical Society's National Chemistry Week to TCU. Kayla Green, Chemistry Club's sponsor and assistant professor of chemistry, said the club is new and has about 30 members. The organization is dedicated to sharing chemistry with the campus, community and eventually the world. To celebrate National Chemistry Week, there will be a periodic table of cupcakes in the chemistry library on Tuesday in Sid Richardson Hall. On Wednesday, there will be flubber-making at the library mall, and on Thursday, the club will have a fundraiser with Chick-fil-A. The club will sell Chick-fil-A sandwiches for $3 each at the library mall to raise money for tutoring underprivileged students for the TAKS test.

 

… Broadcast News

 

WCPO-CIN (Cincinnati, Ohio: local audience 68,211)

“National Chemistry Week in Cincinnati”

October 19, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Chemistry is everywhere. And that is especially obvious this week because it is National Chemistry Week complete with several hands on displays at local libraries through the libraries through the weekend. Here to tell us more is Ed von Bargen with the Cincinnati section of the American Chemical Society.

 

WBNG-TV (Binghamton, N.Y.: local audience 14,639)

“National Chemistry Week activities”

October 19, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

On Sunday, October 24, from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., the Corning Museum of Glass will partner with National Chemistry Week and the Finger Lakes Science and Engineering Festival to present the biggest Families Explore event to date! This fun, educational event for all ages will feature more than 30 hands-on activities, demonstrations, and performances---all included in museum admission. As always, kids and teens, 19 and under, receive free admission to the museum.

 

WNWO-TV (Toledo, Ohio: local audience 7,559)

“Hands-on with National Chemistry Week”

October 19, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Local kids are getting hands-on learning this week in honor of "National Chemistry Week." Activities show how chemistry is used in the movies, theatre, with Halloween costumes and with cool spy stuff like invisible ink. Organizers say their goal is clear. All the activities lead up to the big day--Saturday, 10-23 when volunteers will give away prizes, have scavenger hunts and a raffle table at the imagination station.

 

KNVX-PHX (Phoenix, Ariz.: local audience 48,447)

“Don’t keep vitamins in kitchen, bathroom: Study”

October 19, 2010

 

In today's health news, do not keep your vitamins in your kitchen or bathroom, that’s according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Researchers found the humidity in those rooms degrade some vitamins and it doesn't take long. They degrade in as little as a week and can lose 90% of their potency in about eight weeks.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Science Blogs

“Iowa State, USDA researchers discover eye test for neurological diseases in livestock”

October 19, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

The eyes of sheep infected with scrapie — a neurological disorder similar to mad cow disease — return an intense, almost-white glow when they’re hit with blue excitation light, according to a research project led by Iowa State University’s Jacob Petrich. The findings suggest technologies and techniques can be developed to quickly and noninvasively test for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, progressive and fatal neurological diseases such as mad cow disease in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Petrich, in fact, is working to develop a testing device. The findings were published earlier this year in the journal Analytical Chemistry. The project was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Defense.

 

The Patriot News

“FMU club celebrates National Chemistry Week”

October 20, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Francis Marion's chapter of the American Chemical Society will be holding Chemistry Olympics on Friday, Oct. 22 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. in the University  Center in celebration of National Chemistry Week. National Chemistry Week spans from Oct. 18 to Oct. 24. This year's theme is "Behind the Scenes with Chemistry." The chemistry club hopes that the events they have planned for the Chemistry Olympics will help raise interest in and provide information about not only their organization but chemistry in general.

The Journal and Courier (Lafayette, Ind.: daily circulation 33,223)

“Harrison grad jumps at White House science fair”

October 19, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) press release

 

[MIT News (Cambridge, Mass.: 1.1 million monthly unique users) also carried the story.]

 

Harrison High  School graduate Nathan Benjamin got the phone call Wednesday and less than a week later was shaking the hand of the U.S. president. Benjamin, an 18-year-old, second-year physics student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., was one of about 75 students who visited the White House Monday morning to take part in the first White House Science Fair. Benjamin said he was notified of the invitation Wednesday, by a call from his father. The news left the family reeling from the short notice. "He told me he has gotten a phone call from the American Chemical Society saying they wanted me to come to the White House," Benjamin said. "I was completely shocked." The fair is one of the latest initiatives by President Barack Obama to make the United States more competitive in the science and technology fields… Glenn Ruskin, an American Chemical Society spokesman, said the event highlights the need to reinforce science and math principles in education. "We recognize for the U.S. to be competitive and remain competitive in the global economy, we need to have future innovators in this country," Ruskin said. "These students are exemplars of that."

 

PhysOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.2 million monthly unique users)

“Chemical & Engineering News launches Analytical SCENE news channel”

October 18, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

[FirstScience (London, England: 38,500 monthly unique users) and Chem.Info (Rockaway, N.J.) also covered the item.]

 

Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society (ACS), today launched its latest news channel, the Analytical SCENE. ACS is the world's largest scientific society. The channel is a stream of news articles about analytical research and business, including coverage of cutting-edge measurement methodology, new chemical sensors, the latest spectroscopic techniques, and instrumentation companies' recent moves. Drawing on content from the pages of C&EN, the news channel also contains its own original reporting, significantly expanding the magazine's coverage of analytical research. Readers will have free access to all of the stories on the Analytical SCENE even if they do not have a subscription to C&EN. The Analytical SCENE joins the Environmental SCENE as C&EN's latest news channel. Additional topical channels are planned for 2011.

 

San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, Calif.: daily circulation 241,330)

“National Chemistry Week Celebration”

October 18, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Saturday, Oct 23 10:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Martin Luther King Jr. Library, SJSU, Milpitas,  Calif. The SCV Section of the American Chemical Society will hold our free NCW Celebration. The crowd-favorite Wheel of Chemistry Fortune will be spinning for all kids to win a prize, and we’ll have fun hands-on activities for kids including a slime lab! This will also be your opportunity to pick up your free copy of “Celebrating Chemistry".

 

Science360 News Service (Arlington, Va.: 154,000 monthly unique users)

“New Today on Science360 Radio - Blotting Out The Last Of A Devastating Oil Spill”

October 19, 2010

Origin: OPA podcast

 

Traces of crude oil that linger on the shores of Alaska’s Prince William Sound after the Exxon Valdez oil spill remain highly biodegradable, despite almost 20 years of weathering and decomposition, scientists are reporting in a new study. Their findings, which appear in ACS’ semi-monthly journal Environmental Science & Technology, suggest a simple approach for further cleaning up remaining traces of the Exxon Valdez spill — the largest in U.S. waters until the 2010 Deepwater Horizon episode.

 

Science News (Washington D.C.: bi-weekly circulation 130,000)

“FOR KIDS: Prizes award big ideas about small things”

October 18, 2010

Origin: OPA interview

 

Musicians win Grammys. Writers win Pulitzers. Moviemakers win Oscars. Scientists have the Nobel Prizes. A Nobel Prize, which is awarded by the Nobel Foundation in Sweden, may be the most important recognition a scientist can receive in his or her lifetime. The prize is also lucrative: This year, each prize came with 10 million Swedish kronor, which is about $1.5 million. On October 6, the winners of the chemistry prize were announced. Richard Heck, Ei-ishi Negishi and Akira Suzuki will share the prize for coming up with a way to get carbon atoms to bond with other carbon atoms. Their technique is now widely used in many different areas of chemistry, and it helps scientists build complex and extremely useful substances from molecules that contain carbon. “This is fundamental carbon chemistry at its best,” Joseph Francisco told Science News. Francisco is president of the American Chemical Society in Washington,  D.C. Bonds between carbon atoms are very stable, which means they’re hard to break. But they’re also hard to make — especially if the carbon atoms you want to bring together are in separate molecules. The secret to success, for Heck, Negishi and Suzuki, was to use palladium, a metal, as a sort of matchmaker that brings carbons together.

 

Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.6 million monthly unique users)

“Breakthrough in Nanocrystals Growth”

October 18, 2010

 

For the first time, scientists have been able to watch nanoparticles grow from the earliest stages of their formation. Nanoparticles are the foundation of nanotechnology and their performance depends on their structure, composition, and size. Researchers will now be able to develop ways to control conditions under which they are grown. The breakthrough will affect a wide range of applications including solar-cell technology and chemical and biological sensors. The research is published in Nano Letters. As coauthor Wenge Yang of the Carnegie Institution's Geophysical Laboratory explained: "It's been very difficult to watch these tiny particles be born and grow in the past because traditional techniques require that the sample be in a vacuum and many nanoparticles are grown in a metal-conducting liquid. So we have not been able to see how different conditions affect the particles, much less understand how we can tweak the conditions to get a desired effect."

 

Green Bay Press-Gazette (Green Bay, Wisc.: daily circulation 57,675)

“Business agenda”

October 18, 2010

 

Thursday - Specialty Chemical Industry Forum: 6 p.m., UW-Marinette, Main  Building, Room M-117, Marinette. David Mielke, President and CEO of ChemDesign presents "Chemistry in the Specialty Chemical Industry" emphasizing the need for synergy in chemistry, business, and the environment for success. Co-sponsored by American Chemical Society-Northeast Section. Free and open to the public. (715) 735-4310, www.marinette.uwc.edu.

 

Gulf Daily News (Manama, Bahrain: daily circulation 10,000)

“Energy demand 'to surge 35 percent'”

October 19, 2010

 

Global energy demand will be 35 per cent more in 2030 than it was in 2005, it was revealed yesterday. Industry and Commerce Minister Dr Hassan Fakhro said it was in the interest of governments and companies worldwide to ensure they are up to meeting the requirements when they come up. Speaking at the opening of the Eighth International Conference and Exhibition on Chemistry in Industry (CHEMINDIX 2010) at the Gulf Hotel's Gulf International Convention and Exhibition Centre, he said one is inclined to reflect on the future prospects of demand on energy. "Whilst long-term prospects look reasonably bright, the industry does nevertheless face several near-term challenges in the midst of an unparalleled wave of new chemical capacity coming online in the Middle East and Asia," he said. "If capacity outpaces the growth in demand, this will exert downward pressure on prices and profitability." Conference chairman Abdullah Al Dhuwaihi said the event has come to be recognised across the region as a foremost opportunity for researchers, engineers and industry to share knowledge and exchange of cutting-edge scientific thinking. It has been organised by the Saudi Arabian International Chemical Sciences Chapter of the American Chemical Society and the Bahrain Society of Chemists.

 

… Broadcast News

 

KFOX-TV (El Paso, Tex.: local audience 37,246)

“National Chemistry Week begins at UTEP”

October 18, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

You may not know this, but it's National Chemistry Week. And UTEP begins the celebration with a bang. We'll tell you what the Department of Chemistry has planned.

 

WWNY-TV (Watertown, N.Y.: local audience 35,904)

“National Chemistry Week at Jefferson Community College”

October 18, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

 

Safety glasses, rubber gloves and.....tiny explosions? It's National Chemistry Week and today organic chemistry students at Jefferson Community College performed all sorts of experiments....including making ice cream from liquid nitrogen. Ice cream good enough to eat! The purpose? To show others that chemistry can be fun. National Chemistry Week will end with a "bang" on friday. That's when students and staff will present the "magic of chemistry show," at 12:30 p.m. at the college.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Detroit Science  Center

“Chemistry Fun”

October 18, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

As we continue National Chemistry Week at the Detroit  Science Center, we are all about chemistry! Chemistry makes up many of the everyday things that we use, but being in Detroit, we lean a little automotive. Courtesy of Gary Weaks, a Detroit Science  Center docent and professional chemist, here are some fun chemistry facts about automotive paint: 1) Did you know that your car wears sunblock? It's true. Ultraviolet light is that part of the radiation coming from the sun that has a shorter wavelength than visible light (so we can't see it). However, just as it can damage our skin and cause sunburn, it can also damage the polymers that form the paint on your car. Paint manufacturers will add a family of polymers known as ultraviolet light absorbers (UVA's) to filter out the ultraviolet light while letting the brilliant, visible colors still shine through. Without UVA's your car's paint would crack and fall off in only a few months in the bright sunshine.

 

Dried Fruit

“The Benefits of Freeze Dried Organic Acai Powders”

October 19, 2010

 

On a large palm growing indigenously along the Amazon River and its tributaries and estuaries in South America grows a fruit known as acai. This fruit has become a great economic asset to the native people, especially in recent years as people around the world started discovering the numerous health benefits enjoyed by these peoples for centuries. Studies as recent as 2010 published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, have demonstrated a large number of benefits to freeze dried Acai. One study demonstrates that the fruit has significantly high antioxidant capacities, which in plain English means it has the capacity to rid the body of harmful free radicals. In particular, it was found to have exceptional activity against certain types of radicals and in at least two instances by far the highest of any fruit or vegetable tested to date.

Gizmag (Melbourne, Australia: 1.5 million monthly unique users)

“Electrified nano filter could mean cheap drinking water”

October 17, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

Yi Cui, an Assistant Professor of Material Science and Engineering at Stanford  University, has invented quite the water filter. It’s inexpensive, is very resistant to clogging, and uses much less electricity than systems that require the water to be pumped through them. It also kills bacteria, as opposed to just trapping them, which is all that many existing systems do. Cui and his Stanford colleagues started with a basic cotton filter, as the material is cheap, widely-available and robust. Next, they covered it with sub-microscopic silver nanowires, as silver nanoparticles are well-known for their antibacterial qualities. They then added a layer of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to increase the filter’s electrical conductivity, as electricity is also known to be lethal to bacteria. Finally, they experimented with running various strengths of electrical currents through the device, eventually settling at 20 volts. The research was recently published in the journal Nano Letters.

 

MedIndia (Chennai, India: 878,100 monthly unique users)

“Chemical Signals From Fat Cells Increase Heart Attack Risk”

October 18, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Fat tissues are not dormant storage depot for surplus calories. On the contrary, they send out chemical signals to other parts of the body, perhaps increasing the risk of heart attacks, cancer, and other diseases. The Netherlands scientists are reporting discovery of 20 new hormones and other substances not previously known to be secreted into the blood by human fat cells and verification that fat secretes dozens of hormones and other chemical messengers. The study, “Identification of novel human adipocyte secreted proteins by using SGBS cells,” appears in ACS’ monthly Journal of Proteome Research. Anja Rosenow of the Department of Human Biology, Maastricht  University and colleagues note that excess body fat can contribute to heart disease, diabetes, cancer and other diseases. Many people once thought that fat cells were inert storage depots for surplus calories. But studies have established that fat cells can secrete certain hormones and other substances much like other organs in the body. Among those hormones is leptin, which controls appetite, and adiponectin, which makes the body more sensitive to insulin and controls blood sugar levels. However, little is known about most of the proteins produced by the billions of fat cells in the adult body.

Louisville Courier-Journal (Louisville, Ky.: daily circulation 218,796)

“Waste food? Waste energy”

October 17, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

There are a lot of reasons not to waste food, beginning with the food itself. But now, scientists have calculated that a way the nation could immediately save 350 million barrels of oil a year is to stop wasting food. We could do it “without spending a penny or putting a ding in the quality of life,” according to the American Chemical Society. The study, published in the society's semi-monthly journal, Environmental Science & Technology, showed that it takes the equivalent of about 1.4 billion barrels of oil to “produce, package, prepare, preserve and distribute a year's worth of food in the United   States.” This amounts to 6 to 15 percent of energy consumption. Meanwhile, the Department of Agriculture estimates that about 27 percent of all food is wasted. The most-wasted food items — racking up about 30 percent wasted — are dairy products, grains, fats/oils, eggs, sugar and other sweeteners, according to the study.


Toronto Sun (Toronto, Canada: daily circulation 179,004)

“Books unbound”

October 17, 2010

 

Consider it a new chapter in the literary world. E-books are everywhere, and with choices like the iPad and Kindle, paper books seem to be going the way of the Betamax. And not only have these digital renditions of print books got everyone hooked, they are also a great way to be kind to the environment while catching up on the classics. “It’s definitely a growing trend,” says Nicholas Boshart, who runs Invisible Publishing, a Toronto and Montreal-based company. “E-books are great because it’s a lot easier to get your work out there, you can make books for cheaper and you can cut down your supply chain and save money on print runs. It’s easier for people to find what they want, and you’ll see a lot of small presses have a lot of success in this realm.” According to ecolibris.net, a website that encourages readers to plant a tree for every book they read, an estimated 30 million trees are cut down annually for virgin paper used for the production of books sold in the U.S. alone. And that’s not all, according to journal Environmental Science & Technology. “Reducing paper use does more than save trees. Pulp and paper mills are also a major source of pollution. They release into the air CO2, nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), carbon monoxide, and particulates, which contribute to global warming, smog, acid rain, and respiratory problems.

 

Softpedia (Bellevue, Wash.: 4.6 million monthly unique users)

“MIT Develops Method to Observe Malaria Pathogen”

October 18, 2010

 

Scientists have been trying to make sense of how malaria infects people for many years, but thus far the pathogen has guarded its secrets fiercely. A new observations technique being developed at MIT could finally shed some light on this bacteria. The disease is caused by infection with the protozoa parasite called Plasmodium falciparum, which enters the blood stream, and then uses blood cells as incubators for future generations. “Outside of artemisinin and chloroquine, there really isn’t a huge arsenal for effectively treating malaria,” says Jacquin Niles, an assistant professor of biological engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The expert has recently developed a new observations technique targeted at Plasmodium, which makes it a lot easier for geneticists to pinpoint the genes involved in various functions the pathogen needs to survive. Niles, who recently won a $1.5 million, five-year New Innovator grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to pursue his research, published details of the technique in a recent issue of the esteemed journal ACS Chemical Biology.

 

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000)

“More noise about graphene”

October 18, 2010

 

With the announcement of the Nobel Prize in Physics, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences lauded graphene’s “exceptional properties that originate from the remarkable world of quantum physics.” If it weren’t hot enough before, this atomically thin sheet of carbon is now officially in the global spotlight. The promise of graphene lies in the simplicity of its structure—a ‘chicken wire’ lattice of carbon atoms just one layer thick. This sheet confines electrons in one dimension, forcing them to race across a plane. Such quantum confinement results in stellar electronic, mechanical, and optical properties far beyond what silicon and other traditional semiconductor materials offer. Now, Berkeley Labs materials scientist Yuegang Zhang and colleagues at University of California, Los Angeles are moving toward more efficient devices by studying the ‘noise’ in such graphene nanoribbons. “Atomically-thin graphene nanoribbons have provided an excellent platform for us to reveal the strong correlation between conductance fluctuation and the quantized electronic structures of quasi-one-dimensional systems,” says Zhang, a staff scientist in the Inorganic Nanostructures Facility at the Molecular Foundry. A paper reporting this research titled, “Enhanced conductance fluctuation by quantum confinement effect in graphene nanoribbons,” appears in Nano Letters.

 

The Quad-City Times (Davenport, Iowa: daily circulation 53,942)

“Chemistry Open House wows students”

October 17, 2010

 

Brothers Matthew and Zachary Larson watched intently as demonstrator Carla Mann poked a lighter into a carved pumpkin Sunday during the Chemistry Open House at Augustana College, Rock   Island. Flames flared out of the pumpkin, and the air quickly warmed, making things seem nice and toasty. Mann, a sophomore at Augustana, explained how the explosion is created by the mingling of a lighter and methane from soapy bubbles. “My first thought was that the pumpkin was going to explode,” 15-year-old Matthew of Rock Island said. About 200 youngsters and their families visited the open house and watched pop cans collapse, ice cream made with liquid nitrogen, a dollar bill set aflame but didn’t burn and chemical transformation of copper pennies into bronze. Phil Rabe, president of the student chapter of the American Chemical Society, said the annual event gives elementary students an opportunity to view experiments that aren’t easily facilitated in school classrooms or at home. The open house ties in with this week’s National Chemistry Week.

 

Food Product Design (Phoenix, Ariz.: 19,500 monthly unique users)

“Finally, Soda in the Lemon-Limelight”

October 15, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Lately, it seems like every day brings more bad news for carbonated soft drinks. But a new study puts one popular soda in the limelight (or the lemon-limelight to be more specific) for improving the effectiveness of an oral anticancer drug. The study, published in the American Chemical Society’s journal, Molecular Pharmaceutics, notes that, in clinical trials with an artificial stomach, degassed Sprite improved absorption of the drug. When the unnamed drug, referred to as Compound X for the clinical trials, was given to patients, there were wide differences in how the drug was absorbed, due to variations in stomach acidity and other factors. The researchers then combined Compound X with Captisol, a substance that helps improve the solubility of drug ingredients, as well as Sprite, to help improve solubility of the drug’s ingredients, then tested it with an artificial stomach. They found that the combination increased duodenal concentrations, as well as the difference between duodenal concentrations for different gastric pH. Based on these results, the researchers are suggesting that patients in future clinical trials for Compound X take the drug with Sprite.

 

The Daily Cougar (Houston, Tex.: daily circulation 12,000)

“Student organization highlights National Chemistry Week”

October 18, 2010

 

Various demonstrations, including how to create rain, fog and fire for television, are only a small portion of what UH chemistry students will be presenting this week to educate the community about science and chemistry. The student chapter of the American Chemical Society at UH will be hosting the week-long National Chemistry Week event through Friday. Chemistry and biochemistry junior Justin Khine, serves as ACS student president, and is also a fire-performance artist. Khine will use his fire-manipulation skills and his knowledge in his “Chemistry of Pyrotechnics” demonstration from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Thursday in Lynn  Eusan Park. “The day will be centered around the chemistry of fire, its uses, safety and design,” Khine said. “I hope to show people some tricks of a trade-secret industry.”

 

… Broadcast News

 

WNEM-TV (Flint, Mich.: local audience 14,874)

“Dow recognizes students working on sustainability”

October 18, 2010

 

Dow Chemical recognizes students for their work on sustainability issues. The midland-based company teamed with seven universities for the program that promotes research and innovation. Winners from the schools are being honored as part of National Chemistry Week.

 

WINS-AM (New York, N.Y.)

“National Chemistry Week to kick off”

October 18, 2010

 

Here’s meteorologist Elliot Abrams and this live report. We’ll have sunshine today mixing with clouds. It’ll be cooler than yesterday, and in line with the fact that it’s National Chemistry Week, I think this kind of weather will be a settling influence.

 

KMGH-DEN (Denver, Colo.: local audience 45,464)

“Water an effective weight-loss aid?”

October 15, 2010

 

A new study suggests that an effective weight-loss aid is available straight from your kitchen sink. Water! The study by the American Chemical Society found drinking two eight ounce glasses of water before breakfast, lunch, and dinner may help you lose weight and keep it off for at least a year. Those behind the study aren't sure why drinking water before meals encourages weight loss, but the main reason appears to be that it helps fill your stomach, making you less hungry and less likely to overeat.

 

… From the Blogs

 

About.com Chemistry

“Celebrate National Chemistry Week”

October 17, 2010

 

National Chemistry Week is October 17-23, 2010. This year's "Behind the Scenes with Chemistry" theme celebrates the chemistry of special effects and magic. National Chemistry Week includes Mole Day on October 23rd, which is a day designated to foster interest in chemistry. Visit the ACS Website to find a National Chemistry Week event in your community or to find out how you can organize an event. Here's some information about magic tricks, special effects and Mole Day to get you started. Have a great week!

 

RMC Pharmaceutical Solutions

“National Chemistry Week”

October 14, 2010


Oct 17-23 is National Chemistry Week . This year’s theme is “Behind the Scenes with Chemistry”, which celebrates the chemistry in movies, set designs, makeup artistry and common special effects. This year, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was jointly awarded to a trio of chemists for palladium-catalyzed cross couplings in organic synthesis. A recent article in Chemical and Engineering News quotes Stephen L. Buchwald, a chemistry professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “This is a very exciting day for organic chemistry. This is a well-deserved award that is long overdue. It is hard to overestimate the importance of these processes in modern-day synthetic chemistry. They are the most used reactions by those in the pharmaceutical industry.”

My Fox New York (New York,  N.Y.: 821,400 monthly unique users)

“Stink Bug Repellent May Be on the Way”

October 14, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) press release

 

[Twenty other media outlets, including My Fox Chicago (Chicago, Ill.: 124,500 monthly unique users), My Fox Boston (Boston, Mass.: 138,500 monthly unique users) and My Fox Philadelphia (Philadelphia, Pa.: 125,500 monthly unique users), also covered the story.]

 

Scientists believe they have made progress in the fight against stink bugs. The New York Times reported that a group of Japanese researchers have announced they have developed a stink bug repellent made from a common plant fungus. Their research has been published in the American Chemistry Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Farmers, who complain the stink bugs are ruining their crops, have had little luck with conventional insecticides. The researchers, led by Tottori  University agricultural chemist Hiromitsu Nakajima, announced they found a natural repellent to the bugs that is made from a fungus that grows on green foxtail plants. An extract of the fungus repelled stink bugs in laboratory tests. A chemical in the extract is thought to be able to repel up to 90 percent of stink bugs. USA Today said the green foxtail plant is a common weed in both Japan and the U.S. The newspaper said the stink bug is a major agricultural pest in Japan, especially for rice plant growers. A press release from the American Chemical Society stated that the stink bugs have invaded homes and destroyed fruit and vegetable crops since arriving in the United   States in about 1998.

 

MedIndia (Chennai, India: 878,100 monthly unique users)

“Sprite Can Enhance Effect Of Oral Anti-cancer Drug”

October 15, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Sprite, the popular lemon-lime flavored, caffeine-free soft drink, can enhance the effectiveness of an oral anticancer drug, it seems. In a study appearing in ACS’ Molecular Pharmaceutics, a bi-monthly journal, Faraj Atassi and colleagues with the Eli Lilly and Company note that efforts are underway to develop more anticancer medications that patients can take by mouth. However, biological variations among patients — due to variations in stomach acidity and other factors — can reduce the effectiveness of oral anticancer drugs. Such was the case with the unnamed anticancer drug in the study, identified only as “Compound X.” There were wide differences in how the drug was absorbed in the first patients who took it. In the research, Sprite seemed to control stomach acidity in a way likely to allow greater absorption of the drug into the body. The researchers wrote, “Lilly Compound X (LCX) is an oncology drug that was tested in a phase I clinical study using starch blend capsules. The drug was given to a small patient population (4 patients) and showed large inter- and intra-patient variability.

 

Gather.com (Boston, Mass.: 4.2 million monthly unique users)

“Ginger May Have The Potential To Save The Lives Of Over 300,000 Children A Year”

October 15, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Could one of the most widely used herbs in cooking around the world be just the right medicine for one of the deadliest conditions children face around the world? That’s the promise pointed at by a study published in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. In this study, researchers in Taiwan looked at the role of a ginger extract in blocking the toxin that causes 210 million cases of diarrhea worldwide. The toxin is produced by enterotoxigenic E. coli, which accounts for 380,000 worldwide deaths annually. The study found that zingerone, a compound in ginger, was the likely compound responsible for blocking the toxin.

 

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000)

“New Oils and Materials to Combat Engine Friction”

October 14, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Engine friction - the force that wastes almost 1.4 million barrels of oil per day in cars and trucks in the United States alone - could become less of a problem for fuel-conscious consumers thanks to promising new oils and other materials that scientists are developing. That's the topic of the cover story in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), ACS' weekly newsmagazine. C&EN Senior Business Editor Melody Voith notes that friction, the heat produced when objects rub together, wastes fuel in engines and other machinery and causes their parts to wear and eventually break down. One in every 10 gallons of gasoline in the average car goes to overcoming friction in the engine - about 1.4 million barrels of oil wasted per day or almost $31 billion worth of fuel (at $60 per barrel) lost every year. But the article describes how high-tech lubricants and additives now in development could vastly reduce the effect of friction and improve energy efficiency in everything from car engines to power-generating wind turbines.

 

Contra Costa Times (Walnut Creek, Calif.: daily circulation 168,362)

“News briefs from Lamorinda”

October 14, 2010

 

Chemistry show at Saint Mary's. The California section of the American Chemical Society will present a chemistry show at Saint Mary's College at 7 p.m. Oct. 18. "Get Excited About Chemistry" will feature demonstrations by Marving Lang and Don Showalter, both professors at the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point. The show will coincide with National Chemistry Week, Oct. 17-23. The show will take place in the Moraga Room of the college's Soda  Center. The college is located at 1928 St. Marys Road.

 

Down to Earth (New Delhi, India)

“Ozone stress”

October 31, 2010 issue

 

Ozone is harmful not only to human beings but also to plants. Modern bread wheat, Triticum aestivum, which is the staple diet of a majority of the world populace, is an ozone-sensitive crop. Studies carried out between 1980 and 2007 show that ozone ranging between 30 and 200 parts per billion (PPB), decrease grain yield by 29 per cent in wheat. Studies also show ozone exposure affects tobacco and rice. But a detailed study on biochemical changes triggered by elevated near-surface ozone in ozone sensitive crops like wheat, is lacking. A research team from India, Japan and Nepal found that ozone can harm wheat leaves by disrupting photosynthesis and the activity of vital proteins and genes. Researchers used two wheat cultivars Sonalika and HUW 510 which are highly popular for their medium life span (120 days) and high yield. They exposed them to four different ozone concentrations—nearly no ozone, ambient ozone, ambient plus 10 ppb ozone and ambient plus 20 PPB ozone— one, in an enclosed chamber and the other in a natural environment, simulated at Banaras Hindu University (BHU), Varanasi. Both varieties were exposed to ozone for five hours a day, for 50 days through ozone generators. The findings were published in the September issue of Journal of Proteome Research.

 

Nutraingredients (Montpellier, France: 41,600 monthly unique users)

“Phospholipid shows anti-obesity potential, in mice at least”

October 13, 2010

 

Supplementation of the diet with the phospholipid phosphatidylinositol may exert an anti-obesity effect by modifying gene expression in the liver, suggests a new study with mice. If the findings, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, can be repeated in further studies, it could see phosphatidylinositol established as an ingredient with potential weight management potential. With the World Health Organization estimating that by 2015, there will be more than 1.5 billion overweight consumers, incurring health costs beyond $117 billion per year in the US alone, the opportunities for a scientifically-substantiated weight management food product are impressive. Using Asahi Kasei Pharma Corporation’s phosphatidylinositol, the researchers fed obese mice the ingredient every four days. According to the results, phosphatidylinositol suppressed the weight gain in these animals, and also reduced blood levels of cholesterol.

 

The Manhattan Mercury (Manhattan, Kan.: daily circulation 10,125)

“Chemistry Week offers magic shows and more”

October 14, 2010

 

A week of events to show the importance of chemistry and how it contributes to everyone's quality of life will be offered Oct. 16-23 by Kansas State University's department of chemistry and the local section of the American Chemical Society. "National Chemistry Week is an annual community outreach program that is celebrated by all 189 sections of the American Chemical Society," said Yasmin Patell, assistant teaching scholar in K-State's department of chemistry and a member of the local section of the chemical society. "The goal of the week is to improve the public's awareness of chemistry's contributions to everyday lives and its importance to the nation's economy."

 

… From the Blogs

 

Breast Cancer Treatment

“Breast Cancer Marathon New York”

October 14, 2010

 

In accordance with a Georgetown  University Medical  Center study, an uncomplicated blood test to test levels of circulating tumor cells could assist doctors more perfectly measure how well treatments are running in women with metastatic breast cancer. A blood test can identify the earliest stage of breast cancer, early stage examination has suggested. Amongst 345 women the blood test picked up 95% of cancers, making it much more receptive than existing tests. The Journal of Proteome Research reports that it assesses many proteins to discover a distinguishing cancer fingerprint. Identifying cancers earlier is essential to saving more of the 500,000 people who at present die from breast cancer yearly around the world.

 

Alchemystix

“The ‘Twelve Principles Of Green Chemistry'”

October 14, 2010

 

Though Green chemistry is also known as environmentally benign chemistry, or sustainable chemistry, perhaps the most widely accepted definition of green chemistry is the one offered by chemists Paul Anastas and John Warner, who defined green chemistry as the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use and generation of hazardous substances. The EPA and the American Chemical Society (ACS) have played a major role in promoting research and development, as well as education, in green chemistry field. In 2000 the GCI became a partner of the ACS. Chemical societies around the globe have recognized the importance of green chemistry and promote it through journals, conferences, educational activities, and the formation of GCI chapters. There are GCI chapter affiliates all over the world.

MSNBC (New York, N.Y.: 39.9 million monthly unique  users)

“Illegal  drugs in many herbal weight-loss supplements”

October 13,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) PressPac

 

[Yahoo!  News (Sunnyvale,  Calif.: 37.9 million monthly unique  users) also carried the story.]

 

While herbal weight-loss supplements  may bring the promise of shedding pounds using "natural" products, a new study  shows that many are laden with pharmaceutical agents (lab-made drugs) — some of  which are illegal. The researchers analyzed 81 weight-loss products that had  been taken by 66 patients who had come in to the hospital for treatment for  poisoning. One of the patients had died. While the authors caution their  findings should not be interpreted as a full analysis of the weight-loss  supplement market, they found two or more pharmaceutical agents in 61  supplements they tested, and two supplements contained six of these drugs. "A  wide variety of illicit, weight-reducing agents has been found in proprietary  slimming products that are readily available to the public. Importantly,  ingestion of these products may result in significant toxicities and even  mortality," said the study authors, who are researchers at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Hong  Kong. In the United States, an estimated $34  billion is spent annually on alternative medicine, including supplements. But  the products, sometimes called botanical supplements or herbal remedies, are not  well studied and in many cases could be dangerous, according to a study earlier  this year in Chemical & Engineering  News.

 

Times  of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.15  million)

“Soft  drink boosts effects of anti-cancer drug”

October 14,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

[Twenty media outlets, including Oneindia (Bangalore, India: 7.3 million monthly unique users), The  Medical News (Sydney, Australia: 531,700 monthly unique users) and Thaindian  News (Bangkok, Thailand: 2 million monthly unique users), also covered the  item.]

 

A popular lemon-lime soft drink  could play an unexpected role in improving the effectiveness of an oral anti  cancer drug, experiments with an artificial stomach suggest. The experiments  produced evidence that patients will absorb more of the unnamed drug, tested in  Phase I in clinical trials, when taken with 'flat' or degassed Sprite. Faraj  Atassi and colleagues note that efforts are underway to develop more anticancer  medications that patients can take by mouth. However, biological variations  among patients — due to variations in stomach acidity and other factors — can  reduce the effectiveness of oral anticancer drugs. Such was the case with the  unnamed anticancer drug in the study, identified only as "Compound X." The study  appears in ACS’ Molecular  Pharmaceutics, a bi-monthly journal.

 

 

Malaysia Sun (Petaling Jaya, Malaysia: daily circulation  265,443)

“Electrified  nano filter 'to kill 98pc of disease-causing bacteria in  water'”

October 14,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

[Twenty-eight media outlets,  including AzoNano (Sydney, Australia: 87,100 monthly unique users), DailyIndia.com (Jacksonville, Fla.:  150,000 unique monthly users) and Environmental  Protection Magazine (Dallas, Tex.),  also covered the story.]

 

Scientists are reporting development  and successful initial tests of an inexpensive new filtering technology that  kills up to 98 percent of disease-causing bacteria in water in seconds without  clogging. Yi Cui and colleagues explain that most water purifier's work by  trapping bacteria in tiny pores of filter material. Pushing water through those  filters requires electric pumps and consumes a lot of energy. In addition, the  filters can get clogged and must be changed periodically. The new material, in  contrast, has relatively huge pores, which allow water to flow through easily.  And it kills bacteria outright, rather than just trapping them. Tests of the  material on E. coli-tainted water showed that the silver/electrified cotton  killed up to 98 percent of the bacteria. The filter material never clogged, and  the water flowed through it very quickly without any need for a pump. The report  appears in Nano Letters, a monthly  American Chemical Society journal.

 

Examiner.com (Sacramento, Calif..: 14.4 million monthly unique  users)

“Walnuts  may reduce blood pressure”

October 13,  2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press  release

 

Sacramento-Davis scientists find  more health benefits of eating walnuts. Walnut consumption may help slow the  growth of prostate cancer in mice, a new study has found. What’s more, the nut  has beneficial effects on multiple genes related to the control of tumor growth  and metabolism, UC Davis and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Western Regional  Research Center in Albany,  Calif. have found. In other, new  university tests, results showed that average diastolic blood pressure -- the  "bottom number" or the pressure in the arteries when the heart is resting -- was  significantly reduced during the diets containing walnuts and walnut oil. You  don't have to be a vegan to try the vegan lifestyle once a week or to add some  healthy vegan foods to your favorite foods. The study, by Paul Davis,  nutritionist in the Department of Nutrition and a researcher with the UC Davis  Cancer Center, announced the findings at the annual national meeting of the  American Chemical Society in  San Francisco.  Davis said the  research findings provide additional evidence that walnuts, although high in  fat, are healthful, according to the article, "Walnuts May Help Fight Prostate  Cancer."

 

New  Scientist (London, England: weekly circulation  170,000)

“Green  Machine: Where do solar cells go when they  die?”

October 13,  2010

 

What could be greener than row upon  row of rooftops covered with gleaming solar panels? Yet as the first generation  of photovoltaic panels approach the end of their useful life, the prospect of  these devices ending up in landfill threatens to tarnish their eco-friendly  credentials. Devices installed in the early 1990s will start reaching the end of  their expected 25-year lifespan around 2015, as their ability to turn the sun's  rays into electricity fades. Many solar cells use toxic metals such as cadmium –  or rare metals like indium, which will soon start running out – so recycling  will be crucial. Where should we place these centres? To help governments and  companies plan large-scale recycling networks, Jun-Ki Choi and colleagues at the  Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New  York, have developed a model that calculates how many  centres each country or region should have, and where they should be located. It  is designed to keep down the cost of building the recycling facilities, and  minimise the distance trucks have to travel to collect and transport the panels.  (Environmental Science &  Technology)

 

NOW  Magazine (Toronto, Ontario: weekly circulation  371,000)

“Ecoholic  - I want to do some canning, but aren’t there nasty chemicals in the  lids?”

October 14, 2010  issue

 

I come from a short line of  non-canners. My grandmother didn’t can. My mother didn’t can. My aunt, on the  other hand, had a delectable pantry of homemade pickles and French-Canadian  relishes that sparkled like jewels to my hungry young eyes. Now after decades of  marginality, canning is sexy again. Of course just as more and more newbies are  being seduced by the charms of preserving our local bounty, we’re realizing the  tools of the trade aren’t all without worry… High-profile canners like Marisa at  foodinjars.com are big fans of the product for both water-boiling and  pressure-canning methods. They note that to get a good seal you must, after  putting the lid and band on, unscrew the band a quarter of an inch for air to  escape during processing, then give the lid a good tightening when you remove  the jar from the canner. The only potential problemo lies with the rubber  gaskets used to make the seal on these and on glass-lidded jars. Chemical and Engineering News (an American  Chemical Society publication) calls rubber “arguably the most problematic source  of migrating chemicals,” commonly leaching chems like N-nitrosamines, which can  be carcinogenic. Weirdly, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration only clearly  restricts nitrosamines from baby bottle nipples. But the good news is the rubber  industry has figured out ways to block or significantly reduce leaching in  food-contacting rubber.

 

Natural  News (Toronto, Ontario: 300,580 monthly unique  users)

“Super Nutrients  Stimulate Longevity Genes and Promote Health”

October 14,  2010

 

The benefits of calorie restriction  have been known for the past 75 years and provide an important means to increase  lifespan. Scientists continue to uncover the evolved biological mechanisms that  have been shown to extend life and improve health in animals and mammals alike.  Eating too much burdens our ability to properly metabolize such a large number  of calories and raises the risk of disease. Excess energy from food also  influences our genes that regulate aging. The good news is that you can  experience the health benefits of calorie restriction by supplementing with  targeted nutrients. Every time you eat, walk or breathe you create free radicals  as part of normal metabolism. These tiny particles wreak havoc on the cellular  matrix of our cells and are particularly damaging to our brain. Grape seed  extract has been shown to decrease free radical induced protein oxidation that  affects the electrical conductivity of neurons in the brain. Information  published in the Journal of Agricultural and  Food Chemistry document the ability of grape seed extract to modify  genes which control brain inflammation and may improve cognitive function and  memory.

 

Pensacola News Journal (Pensacola, Fla.: daily circulation  60,000)

“American  Chemical Society to host panel discussion”

October 13,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

The Pensacola and Mobile sections of  the American Chemical Society on Thursday are hosting a panel  discussion in Spanish Fort, Ala., on the impact  of the oil spill on Gulf Coast marine life. Panel members will  include Richard Snyder, professor and director of the Center for Environmental  Diagnostics and Bioremediation at the University of West Florida; Robert Menzer,  professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, College Park, and former  director of the Environmental Protection Agency Gulf Breeze Environmental  Research Laboratory; and Will Patterson, associate professor in biology at the  University of West Florida where he directs the university's fisheries  laboratory. The event begins at 6 p.m. at Wintzell's Oyster House at 30500 State Highway  181 in Spanish Fort.

 

… From the  Blogs

 

The  Analyzer Source

“How I Am Celebrating National  Chemistry Week October 17-23, 2010”

October 13,  2010

 

As an American Chemical Society (ACS) member  volunteer through their Chemistry Ambassadors  Program I am preparing to celebrate National Chemistry Week October  17-23, 2010 by reaching out to children in my local community in grades K-8 to  "show them the chemistry". I've already scheduled my presentations on Thursday  October 21, 2010 at my local YMCA After School Enrichment Program which will  allow me to conduct age appropriate chemistry experiments with a K-8 audience.  The ACS has excellent resources available for other chemistry folks out there  who also want to share their love of chemistry in their community and educate  the young chemists in grades  K-12. Check it out:  http://www.acs.org/chemistryambassadors

 

Eartheasy

“Bottled Teas Low in Health  Benefits”

October 13,  2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press  release

 

Drinking green or black tea offers a  range of health benefits, but health-conscious consumers may not be getting  similar benefits from bottled tea drinks. Researchers reported at the National  Meeting of the American Chemical  Society that many bottled teas contain almost no antioxidants –  polyphenols from tea. Compared with home-brewed green or black tea, bottled teas  contained much lower doses of polyphenols … the antioxidant and nutrigenomic  (gene-influencing) compounds believed responsible for the health benefits  associated with tea.

New York Times (New York, N.Y.: daily circulation 951,063)

“Electrical Charge Helps Sun Shine on Solar Panels”

October 12, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) National Meeting press release

 

At first glance, the most logical place to establish a large-scale solar-power installation is in the desert, where the blistering sun is not impeded by cloud cover and much of the land is not fit for cultivation. But these dry, inhospitable stretches of sand, with their frequent dust-filled blasts of wind, pose a big problem for photovoltaic panels, which are significantly less effective when covered with dirt. Even a thin layer of grit — four grams per square meter, or one-seventh of an ounce for almost 11 square feet — can decrease a panel’s solar power output 40 percent or more. Dust in the Negev, for example, accumulates an average 0.4 grams per square meter per day; 10 days of uninterrupted buildup would reach that level. And dust levels are even higher in other popular solar sites across the Middle East, Australia and India. Fortunately, a team of U.S. research scientists has found a potential solution, based on technology developed with NASA for missions to Mars and presented in late August at the 240th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston. The solution may be a self-cleaning coating for photovoltaic panels that repels dust with the help of electrical charges. It is the only technology for automatic dust removal “that doesn’t require water or mechanical movement,” said Malay Mazumder of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Boston University, who directed the research.

 

Global Voices (Amsterdam, The Netherlands: 158,300 monthly unique users)

“Brazil: Research and Advances in Renewable Energy Sources”

October 13, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

Brazil has received acclaim in recent decades as a country of clean energy, with sources like hydroelectric power and alcohol playing a major role in the country’s energy mix. The inclusion of these sources of alternative energy have been made possible thanks to research conducted by various social players and to the government’s adoption of the systems proposed… In recent months, blogs like Lapsblog, Sandro Nasser Sicuto and Tecnólogos Ambientais have reported more than one Brazilian breakthrough in energy and power. At the Boston meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Unicamp’s Professor Fernando Galembeck introduced a model that captures the electricity that accumulates in atmospheric water droplets, hygroelectricity. This study brings academic light some controversial points regarding the formation of lightening and presents initial steps to harness this source of energy for human development. The application of this discovery is still being studied and may take some time before its presence is a reality in consumers’ every day lives. Hygroelectricity will likely be harnessed using metal plates, but the materials and mechanisms involved require further study.

 

Cincinnati Enquirer (Cincinnati,  Ohio: daily circulation 206,320)

“Chemistry demonstration planned at Mariemont library”

October 13, 2010

 

A chemistry demonstration will be conducted at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 19, at the Mariemont branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton  County, 3810 Pocahontas Ave. The demonstration, in conjunction with National Chemistry Week, is a hands-on educational program that unites the American Chemical Society's local chapter with the community by communicating the importance of chemistry to our quality of life. A series of fascinating and fun programs hosted at various Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County locations will incorporate this year's "Behind the Scenes of Chemistry!" theme. The mission of National Chemistry Week is to reach the public, particularly elementary and secondary school children, with positive messages about chemistry.

 

The Detroit News (Detroit, Mich.: daily circulation 188,171)

“Hands on Chemistry Experiments during National Chemistry Week”

October 13, 2010

 

Sunday, October 17th, 12 PM - 4 PM (Please come early so the children have time to do all of the experiments) Cranbrook Institute of science, Please see web site for prices and directions: http://science.cranbrook.edu/ Target age group is 7-12, but all ages are welcome. Over 10 "hands-on" experiments to do for children.

 

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000)

“Environmental Science & Technology special issue on environmental policy”

October 12, 2010

 

Key articles in a special print edition of the American Chemical Society journal, Environmental Science & Technology (ES&T), one of the world's premier environmental journals, are now available online. The articles will appear Jan. 1, 2011 in an ES&T issue on environmental policy. The topics range from the mysterious disorder decimating honey bee colonies to ways to capture and store carbon and mitigate greenhouse effect. Those marked "Feature" are written in a less technical style and suitable for general readers, including students and non-scientists. Full texts of the Features can be accessed now without charge. The entire special issue will be available without charge online throughout 2011 when the world celebrates the International Year of Chemistry. Entitled "Environmental Policy: Past, Present, and Future," the special issue of ES&T recognizes closure of a "green" decade in which people became more aware of environmental issues and society marked the 40th anniversaries of Earth Day, the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

 

Valdosta State University News (Valdosta,  Ga.: 82,400 monthly unique users)

“National Chemistry Poster Contest”

October 13, 2010

 

Area students, kindergarten through 12th-grade, are invited to participate in a nationwide poster contest in celebration of National Chemistry Week Oct. 17-23. American Chemical Society (ACS) Chapters throughout the country are hosting local competitions; the winners of area contests will advance to the national contest in Washington, DC. Chemistry Professor Linda DelaGarza is organizing the Valdosta event, which will be held for contestants on Thursday, Oct. 21, in VSU’s Hugh C. Bailey Science  Center, room 3025. The American Chemical Society (ACS) chose this year’s theme, “Behind the Scenes with Chemistry,” to encourage students to develop fun, motivational and informative posters that depict the roles chemistry plays in special effects used in movies and television shows. Students should consider how chemistry impacts make up artistry, special effects and set designs.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Science in Public

“Prehistoric healthcare, pessimistic dogs and more”

October 13, 2010

 

This week on radio, Tim Thwaites is talking about the first embryonic stem cell trial; that amazing substance—water; prehistoric healthcare; the mental health of dogs; and more… At the smallest scale, water’s far from dull—New simulations reveal that water molecules join up into two different types of structures that break apart and recombine at lightning speed. Such complexity might be the reason for life as we know it, say European chemists.—Journal of Physical Chemistry B

 

In Sequence

“Oxford Group Engineers Protein Nanopore for Better Base Recognition, DNA Methylation Detection”

October 12, 2010

 

Researchers have demonstrated that an alpha-hemolysin nanopore can identify epigenetic modifications of DNA, suggesting that eventually, nanopores will be able to perform single-molecule methylation sequencing of a DNA strand — an advance over current methylation sequencing methods, such as bisulfite sequencing, which require the DNA to be modified or amplified. The study was published last week in Chemical Communications by Hagan Bayley's group at the University of Oxford. Bayley is a co-founder of Oxford Nanopore, which supports much of his research. The work builds on a previous study, published this August in Nano Letters, where Bayley's group showed that it could enhance one of the three base recognition sites in the alpha-hemolysin pore to maximize the signal from that site.

New York Times (New York, N.Y.: daily circulation 951,063)

“Bring On the Stink Bugs”

October 11, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) press release

 

[Treehugger (New York, N.Y.: 2.2 million monthly unique users) and RedOrbit (Dallas, Tex.: 3.9 million monthly unique users) also covered the story.]

 

Have stink bugs met their noxious match? That’s the claim of a group of Japanese researchers who announced last week that they had developed the first-ever stink bug repellent, made from a common plant fungus. The repellent could promise relief for homeowners and farmers plagued by the invasive bugs, which arrived in the United States from Asia in the late 1990s and have become a highly damaging pest to farmers and a major annoyance to homeowners. They release a noxious, skunk-like odor when crushed or disturbed, and harm crops by boring holes in everything from apples to soybeans. As our colleague Ken Maguire reported in September, these invasive stink bugs (as opposed to domestic varieties) have no natural predators here and are particularly rampant in mid-Atlantic states like Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Last week, however, a group of researchers led by Hiromitsu Nakajima, an agricultural chemist at Tottori University in Japan, declared that they had found a powerful natural repellent to the bugs. The paper appears in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

 

Yahoo! Health (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 8.4 million monthly unique users)

“5 Worst Halloween Candies (and 10 Best Survival Tips!)”

October 11, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

A cocker spaniel weighs about 24 pounds. You know what else weighs 24 pounds? The heft of candy the average American gobbles down each year, a big chunk of that falling to our waistlines in the days before and after Halloween. Fun size? I don't think so — unless it's fun being size 16. These stats could very well turn you as white as a ghost: Three miniature Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups—the kind you find in office candy bowls and trick-or-treat-bags—fill your belly with more sugar than a glazed doughnut. Half a pack of Skittles has more sugar than a scoop of Haagen-Dazs Cookies and Cream Ice Cream… SURVIVAL TIP #2: Consume drinks before treats. Drinking 16 ounces of water before a meal fills the stomach, quells hunger, and helps you lose weight, according to a study presented at the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. Use this strategy to help tamp your candy cravings.

 

Salon (San Francisco, Calif.: 4.2 million monthly unique users)

“Seven tasty ways to stop wasting food”

October 11, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

A new study shows we throw out a quarter of our food. Here are tips and super-easy dishes to help you eat it all. Somewhere, in the back of your mind, you're a little terrified of the peak-oil apocalypse, where man turns on man and we start waging tribal warfare for what little dribs and drabs of fossil fuels we have left (wait, that hasn't happened already?). You traded in your car for a bike, you're praying for the solar power revolution. You know what's really going to give you a heart attack? A new study in the American Chemical Society's journal that found that Americans waste -- just straight-up throw away -- the equivalent of 350 million barrels of oil a year in the form of food. That's about 70 times the amount of oil in the BP Gulf oil spill. Basically, we're tossing more than a quarter of all the food we grow, package, ship, buy, cook, serve and store, including almost a full third of all our dairy, grains and eggs.

 

San Jose Mercury News (San Jose, Calif.: daily circulation 230,870)

“National Chemistry Week Celebration”

October 11, 2010

 

The SCV Section of the American Chemical Society will hold our free NCW Celebration. The crowd-favorite Wheel of Chemistry Fortune will be spinning for all kids to win a prize, and we’ll have fun hands-on activities for kids including a slime lab! This will also be your opportunity to pick up your free copy of “Celebrating Chemistry".

 

Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, Calif.: daily circulation 279,032)

“Adeona Announces Five Scientific Publications on Role of Copper Toxicity and Zinc Deficiency in Alzheimer's Disease and Cognitive Decline”

October 12, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Adeona Pharmaceuticals, Inc., announced five scientific publications on the role of copper toxicity and zinc deficiency in Alzheimer's disease and cognitive decline. The author of all these publications is Adeona's scientific founder and consultant, George J. Brewer, M.D., the Morton S. and Henrietta Sellner Emeritus Professor of Human Genetics and Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan. The first two publications describe the results of Adeona's observational clinical study of zinc and copper status in 29 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 30 patients with Parkinson's disease, and 29 age- and sex-matched controls (CopperProof-1)… The fourth publication entitled, "Risks of Copper and Iron Toxicity During Aging in Humans", was published in electronic form on December 7, 2009 in Chemical Research in Toxicology. The publication addresses the emerging evidence on the role of chronic copper toxicity in a broader array of diseases that widely affect persons over the age of 50, including Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis and complications of diabetes mellitus. Dr. Brewer concludes in that publication, "it seems clear that large segments of the population are at risk for toxicities from free copper and free iron and... it seems clear that preventive steps should begin now."

 

Kansas City Star (Kansas City,  Mo.: daily circulation 260,724)

“Lehigh Technologies Adds Depth to Strategic Tire and Industrial Rubber Team”
October 11, 2010

 

Lehigh Technologies, a manufacturer of sustainable ultra fine rubber powders, announced today the addition of David R. O'Brien as major account manager for the tire and industrial rubber team… A well known industry insider by tire and industrial rubber manufacturers in the U.S., Canada and Mexico, O'Brien has served as Chairman of the Southern Rubber Group and was that organization's Member of the Year in 1996. He also has held the position of Chair of the American Chemical Society's Rubber Division and is currently on its Steering Committee.

The Daily Herald (Columbia,  Tenn.: daily circulation 12,048)

“UT-Martin ACSC Chapter wins chemistry award”

October 11, 2010

 

The University of Tennessee at Martin student members of the American Chemical Society Chapter recently won an Outstanding Rating and the Green Chemistry chapter award and leads the nation for the number of outstanding ratings (30) and Green Chapter designations (nine). Thirty-six chapters received the outstanding ratings this year, and 52 were designated Green Chapters. There are more than 1,000 chapters nationwide.

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 97,800 monthly unique users)

“Novel graphene amplifier is a major step from single devices to circuits”

October 11, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Transistors are the fundamental building blocks of modern electronic devices. Depending on whether they are used to amplify or switch electronic signals they can be grouped into amplifiers and switches. Transistor switches form the basis of all digital circuits in computers where they control on/off operations… Graphene is one of the 'hottest' materials in nanoelectronics labs. This material remains capable of conducting electricity even at the limit of nominally zero carrier concentration because the electrons don't seem to slow down or localize. In the ultimate nanoscale transistor – dubbed a ballistic transistor – the electrons avoid collisions, i.e. there is a virtually unimpeded flow of current. But now, a team of researchers from Rice University and University of California, Riverside (UCR) has demonstrated the first triple-mode graphene amplifier. Using their complementary expertise, the Rice-UCR team has shown experimentally that by leveraging the ambipolarity of charge transport in graphene, the amplifier can be configured in the common-source, common-drain, or frequency multiplication mode of operation by changing the gate bias. This important advancement in graphene technology will shortly appear in ACS Nano.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Greener Spaces

“Bye Bye Stinky”

October 11, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

Last week, however, a group of researchers led by Hiromitsu Nakajima, an agricultural chemist at Tottori University in Japan, declared that they had found a powerful natural repellent to the bugs. The repellent is derived from a fungus that infects green foxtail plants, a common weed found in Japan and the United States. An extract of the fungus strongly repelled stink bugs in laboratory tests, and could be capable of repelling up to 90 percent of stink bugs in other settings, the researchers wrote. (Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry)

 

Words from a Wet Vet

“News and links: Vaccine for white spot disease (Ich)”

October 11, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release


Fish can be immunized against Ich, the dreaded “white-spot” disease, that is the bane of home aquarists and commercial fish farmers, government scientists have shown. Although the team still has many obstacles to overcome, the study presented at a Boston meeting of the American Chemical Society indicates for the first time that a protective vaccine is within reach.

USA Today (McLean,  Va.: daily circulation 1.8 million)

“Foxtail fungus found to repel stink bugs”

October 11, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) press release

 

[Ten other media outlets, including Softpedia (Bellevue, Wash.: 3.7 million monthly unique users), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 55,000) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000), also covered the story.]

 

A Japanese laboratory may have come up with a repellent for the stink bug, a new and particularly noxious invader to the United States. Americans didn't have the displeasure of encountering the unpleasant stink bug of Asia until 1998, when the brown marmorated stink bug first appeared here. It's now spread throughout the Mid-Atlantic  states, invading homes and damaging crops. The bugs get their name from the skunk-like odor they emit when annoyed or crushed. Now Hiromitsu Nakajima and colleagues at the Department of Agricultural Chemistry at Tottori University in Koyama, Japan, have created a repellent from a fungus that lives inside the green foxtail plant, a common weed in Japan, where stink bugs are a major agricultural pest, especially in rice plants. Their paper is published in the American Chemistry Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Today farmers use pesticides to keep the bugs at bay. But Nakajima found that extracts of the foxtail fungus strongly repelled the white-spotted stink bug, which they used as a test subject because it is easy to collect, maintain, and handle under laboratory conditions.

 

Miami Herald (Miami, Fla.: daily circulation 240,223)

“Waste food? Waste energy”

October 10, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

[The Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, Calif.: daily circulation 279,032), the Kansas City Star (Kansas City, Mo.: daily circulation 260,724) the Des Moines Register (Des Moines, Iowa: daily circulation 116,876) and the Lexington Herald-Leader (Lexington, Ky.: daily circulation 111,124) also covered the item.]

 

There are a lot of reasons not to waste food, beginning with the food itself. But now, scientists have calculated that a way the nation could immediately save 350 million barrels of oil a year is to stop wasting food. We could do it "without spending a penny or putting a ding in the quality of life," according to the American Chemical Society. The study, published in the society's semi-monthly journal, Environmental Science & Technology, showed that it takes the equivalent of about 1.4 billion barrels of oil to "produce, package, prepare, preserve and distribute a year's worth of food in the United States." This amounts to 6 to 15 percent of energy consumption. Meanwhile, the Department of Agriculture estimates that about 27 percent of all food is wasted.

 

CBS News (New York, N.Y.: 9.6 million monthly unique users)

“Red Onion vs. Heart Disease: Has High Cholesterol Met Its Match?”

October 8, 2010

 

Can eating red onions lower your risk for heart attack and stroke? A new study suggests the answer to that question may be yes. At least if you're a hamster. Scientists in Hong Kong fed crushed onions to hamsters that had been on a high-cholesterol diet. After eight weeks, the little guys' levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol fell by 20 percent, the Daily Mail reported. That's good news, because elevated LDL cholesterol levels are linked to cardiovascular disease. Red onions may have other health benefits as well. They seem to contain compounds that slow the growth of colon and liver cancer cells, according to a 2004 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

 

The Journal Star (Peoria, Ill.: daily circulation 65,000)

“Health Watch: Study shows most boomers don’t fear 50”

October 11, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

[The Rockford Register Star (Rockford, Ill.: daily circulation 55,913), the Norwich Bulletin (Norwich, Conn.: daily circulation 26,583) and the Canton Repository (Canton, Ohio: daily circulation 66,812) also covered the item.]

 

Cheerios conducted The Real 50 report to find out how 50-year-old Americans feel about their age, health and the next phase of their lives. Key findings from the survey uncover that Americans born in 1960 feel youthful, but recognize that improving or maintaining their health is of the utmost importance… Pour yourself a bowl of brightly colored berries to refresh your brain as well as your taste buds. Recent research shows that fresh or frozen strawberries, blueberries, acai berries and other deeply colored berries can help the brain stay healthy. These berries, and possibly walnuts, activate the brain's own housekeeper cells, which clean up and recycle toxic debris linked to age-related mental decline. In new research presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston on Aug. 23, Poulose focused on why mental function declines with age. He believes there is a reduction in the brain's natural housecleaning process so that housekeeper cells, called microglia, fail to clean up biochemical debris. This toxic litter builds up in the brain and interferes with mental functioning. Poulose found that extracts from berries enable the microglia to remove the toxic chemicals before they do damage.

 

Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, Australia: daily circulation 212,700)

“Hydroelectric power 'may not be green'”

October 11, 2010

 

Scientists have found that some reservoirs formed by hydroelectric dams emit more greenhouse gases than expected, potentially upsetting the climate-friendly balance of hydroelectric power. A scientific study of Lake Wohlen in central Switzerland found "unexpectedly high" emissions of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, the Swiss Federal Institute of Acquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG) said on Monday. The 150,000 tonnes of methane bubbling up from sediment in the retention lake on the river Aare over a year are the equivalent of emissions from 2,000 cows, or 25 million kilometres travelled by cars, EAWAG added in a statement. "So hydropower isn't quite as climate-neutral as people have assumed in the past," said one of the scientists involved, Tonya Del Sontro. The peer-reviewed research by scientists at Swiss, German and Israeli institutes was published in the US journal Environmental Science and Technology.

 

Science Magazine (Washington D.C.: weekly circulation 125,000)

“At the Smallest Scale, Water Is a Sloppy Liquid”

October 8, 2010

 

Water may seem like a dull liquid. But at the molecular scale, there's a party going on. New simulations reveal that water molecules actually form two different types of structures that break apart and recombine at lightning speeds. Such complexity just might be the reason why life as we know it sprang forth in a wet environment. As simple as an individual water molecule is—two atoms of hydrogen bonded with one of oxygen—it forms weak bonds to its neighbors creating more-complex structures. That's allowed it to serve as the medium for the growth and evolution of the most complex molecules in the universe, including enzymes, proteins, and the mother of all known living creatures, DNA. But why water and not, say, hydrogen peroxide or even ammonia? Scientists have been wrestling with this quandary for over a century. Indeed, 5 years ago, Science called this one of the 125 most important unresolved scientific issues. A new study might have uncovered an essential clue. Researchers used computer models to probe how water molecules form structures, a phenomenon that has resisted visual examination so far. What the researchers observed, they reported online in The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, is that water molecules bond with one another in a surprisingly complex and dynamic way.

 

… Broadcast News

 

WCBS-NY (New York, N.Y.)

“Stink bug repellent on the way?”

October 10, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

In the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists say they've identified a substance that will make stink bugs as sick of us as we are of them. It's a fungus in the green foxtail plant, a weed found in Japan as well as here in the U.S. It could eventually be developed in the first commercial repellent for stink bugs.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Nitin’s Notes

“Globalization, with a local flavor”

October 10, 2010

 

The recent cover story of Chemical & Engineering News titled “Chemistry Energizes China” has a pretty good overview of how China is charging ahead in the renewable energy space and how material companies are adapting to it. One of the comments that stood out for me was from Edward Frindt, CEO of Novolyte Technologies with reference to energy materials – “We see the U.S. as an emerging market and China as the established market.”

 

KidsGuide Magazine

“National Chemistry Day at the Santa Ana Zoo”

October 10, 2010

 

Explore Chemistry displays sponsored by the American Chemical Society throughout the zoo. Sunday, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. FREE with price of admission. (714) 953-8555.

Voice  of America  News (Washington D.C.: weekly audience 125  million)

“Americans  Trash 25 Percent of Their Food”

October 7,  2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs  (OPA) press release

 

Americans waste more energy in the  food they throw away, than Switzerland or Sweden  consume in a year. Researchers at the University of Texas, Austin say that points to a painless way to  save energy: stop wasting food. According to a new study in the Journal of  Environmental Science and  Technology, food waste and the energy required to produce it,  represent an unrecognized opportunity to conserve energy and reduce climate  changing emissions. Scientists at the Center for International Energy and  Environmental Policy set out to answer three questions about the relationship  between food and energy use: how much energy is in food, how much food is wasted  and how much energy is in the wasted food. Michael Webber, the center's  associate director and co-author of the study, says between eight and 16 percent  of U.S. energy consumption is tied up in  food production, transportation, preservation and disposal. "And then we throw  away at least a quarter of that food. Some people say even 50 percent."

 

Yahoo!  News (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 37.9 million monthly unique  users)

“Toxic  Hungary flood a reminder of ecological disasters  past”

October 7,  2010

 

The European Union fears that  Hungary's sludge spill could turn  into one of the worst ecological disasters on record. NPR reports that  Greenpeace spokesman Herwit Schuster has called the incident "one of the top  three environmental disasters in Europe in the  last 20 or 30 years." The spill reminds us that ecological disasters can happen  at any time and devastate the environment and people's lives… On April 20, 2010,  the oil drilling rig Deepwater Horizon exploded in the Gulf  of Mexico, killing 11 workers and injuring an additional 17 people.  According to Chemical & Engineering  News, the three-month flow of oil was finally staunched on July 15,  when the wellhead was successfully capped. All told, approximately 4.9 million  barrels, or 185 million gallons, of oil, were released into the waters of the  Gulf. Although the full environmental impact of the disaster has yet to be  determined, it is clear that the Gulf of Mexico  oil spill will have implications for decades to  come.

 

Zimbio (San Carlos, Calif.: 20.1 million monthly unique  users)

“Garlic  oil shows protective effect against heart damage in  diabetics”

October 7,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

Diabetes isn't a disease that only  impacts the pancreas and plays havoc with blood sugar levels -- it ups the risk  for a host of other health problems, from damaged vision to nerve pain. And over  30 percent of diabetics in the U.S. have some kind of heart disease, too,  according to statistics from the Framingham study. In addition to large vessel  disease and accelerated atherosclerosis, diabetes is also associated with  diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), which enlarges the heart and makes it more thick  and rigid than normal. Complications from cardiomyopathy include heart failure,  abnormal heart rhythms, fluid buildup in the lungs and legs and death. But new  research just published in the Journal of  Agricultural and Food Chemistry shows a simple, natural therapy --  garlic oil -- may prevent this potentially deadly heart problem which inflames  and weakens the heart muscle.

 

R&D  Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly  circulation 80,000)

“2010  Chemistry Nobel laureate Ei-ichi Negishi leads C&EN  webinar”

October 7,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

Ei-ichi Negishi, Ph.D., who just  shared the 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, will lead a Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN)  webinar Oct. 12 on the discovery, development and application of the famed ZACA  reaction. C&EN is the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society  (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. That landmark chemical reaction  provides new ways of making medicines and other key products using green  chemistry methods, which minimize or avoid the use of potentially toxic  substances. ZACA stands for zirconium-catalyzed asymmetric carboalumination of  alkenes. The webinar, sponsored by Aldrich Chemistry, will be broadcast live  from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., at 9:30 a.m. EDT as part of the fifth  annual two-day Negishi-Brown and Catalytic Asymmetric and Other Selective  Syntheses (CAOSS) Lectures. Stu Borman, deputy assistant managing editor of  C&EN, will moderate the session. To take part in the webinar, go to www.cen-online.org/webinar. All Web registrants can ask  questions during the live event.

 

Technology  Review (Cambridge, Mass.: bi-monthly circulation  315,000)

“Tunable, Stretchable  Optical Materials”

October 8,  2010

 

The field of metamaterials has  yielded devices that seem to come from science fiction--invisibility cloaks,  highly absorbent coatings for solar cells and ultra-high-resolution microscope  lenses. Metamaterials are precisely tailored to manipulate electromagnetic  waves--including visible light, microwaves, and other parts of the spectrum--in  ways that no natural materials can. With few exceptions, however, these  materials work in a very limited range of wavelengths of light, making them  impractical--an invisibility cloak isn't very useful if it only redirects light  of one color but can be readily seen under others. Now researchers at Caltech  have shown that by mechanically stretching an optical filter made from a  metamaterial, they can dynamically change which wavelength of infrared light it  responds to. Researchers led by Harry Atwater, a professor of applied physics  and materials science, found that they could stretch the polymer sheets by as  much as 50 percent, changing the distance between the two parts of the  resonator, without warping the dimensions of the silver "C" and "l." This let  them dynamically change which wavelength of light the material would respond to  over a broad swath of the infrared spectrum. The work is described online in the  journal Nano  Letters.

 

Genetic  Engineering & Biotechnology News (New Rochelle, N.Y.: bi-monthly circulation  65,000)

“American  Chemical Society Webinars focus on US immigration policies for international  scientists”

October 7,  2010

Origin: OPA press  release

 

News media and others interested in  the chemical sciences are invited to join the next in a series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars  focusing on updates on U.S. immigration policies for  international scientists. Scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 14, from 2 - 3 p.m. EDT,  the free ACS Webinars will feature Kelly McCown, J.D., of McCown and Evans LLP,  San Francisco,  speaking on Navigating U.S. Immigration -- Updates for International Scientists.  News media and scientists can tune into the conference without charge but must  register in advance at https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/336327587.

 

Connecticut Post (Bridgeport, Conn.: daily circulation  53,866)

“National  Chemistry Day”

October 7,  2010

 

Saturday, Oct 23 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.,  at New York Hall of  Science, New York, N.Y. Get out your lab  goggles and join NYSCI and the American  Chemical Society in celebrating the excitement of chemistry. Members  from area colleges' chemical organizations will be hosting hands-on activity  tables.

 

The  Medical News (Sydney, Australia: 523,100 monthly unique  users)

“Scientists  engineer bacteria cell wall with small molecules to combat  diseases”

October 8,  2010

 

A team of Yale University scientists has engineered the  cell wall of the Staphylococcus aureus bacteria, tricking it into incorporating  foreign small molecules and embedding them within the cell wall. The finding,  described online in the journal ACS Chemical  Biology this week, represents the first time scientists have  engineered the cell wall of a pathogenic "Gram-positive" bacteria-organisms  responsible not only for Staph infections but also pneumonia, strep throat and  many others. The discovery could pave the way for new methods of combating the  bacteria responsible for many of the most infectious diseases. The team  engineered one end of their small molecules to contain a peptide sequence that  would be recognized by the bacteria. In Staphylococcus aureus, an enzyme called  sortase A is responsible for attaching proteins to the cell wall. "We sort of  tricked the bacteria into incorporating something into its cell wall that it  didn't actually make," said David Spiegel, a Yale chemist who led the study.  "It's as if the cell thought the molecules were its own proteins rather than  recognizing them as something foreign."

 

… Broadcast  News

 

WKPT-TV (Tri-Cities, Tenn.: national audience 1.46  million)

“Garlic  oil can help protect heart”

October 8,  2010

Origin: OPA  PressPac

 

[KMVT-TV (Twin Falls, Idaho: national audience 903,114), WSAZ-TV (Charleston, W.V.: national audience 499,815), WGEM-TV (Quincy, Ill.: local audience 1,609), WZDK-TV (Huntsville, Ala.), KHAS-TV (Lincoln, Neb.), WSWP-TV (Bluefield, W.V.), KFXA-IOW (Iowa City, Iowa) and AgDay (South Bend, Ind.) also covered the item.]

 

If you have or know someone with  diabetes, you want to pay attention to this story. A new study in the Journal of Agricultural  and Food  Chemistry says garlic oil can help  protect the heart. Researchers found garlic has significant ability to help with  heart diseases. Studies show the garlic oil, when compared to corn oil,  protected the heart from damage. Results are being attributed to garlic oil's  potent mix of  antioxidants.

 

… From the  Blogs

 

Dr.  Emily Kane

“Natural  Health News You Can Use: October 2010”

October 7,  2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press  releases

 

A study has found that two simple  methods of “stressing” potatoes increase the antioxidant levels of these  vegetables substantially. The methods included immersing potatoes in salt water  and adding a small electrical charge between 10 and 30 seconds; and immersing  potatoes in water and subjecting them to ultrasound for 5 or 10 minutes… A study  concludes consumption of berries, and possibly walnuts, triggers a natural brain  mechanism that cleans up and recycles toxic proteins, which are linked to  age-related memory loss and dementia. Other studies found that antioxidant-rich  foods have anti-aging effects on the brain but this study pinpoints a completely  different way that berries stave off the mental effects of aging. These studies  were presented in Boston on August at the 240th annual meeting of  the American Chemical  Society.

 

FavStocks

“Brown  Chemists Develop Process to Simplify Waste Vegetable Oil to Biodiesel Process,  Chart Progress of Transesterification Reaction”

October 8,  2010

 

Two chemists at Brown University have streamlined the conversion  of waste vegetable oil (WVO) into biodiesel, eliminating the need for corrosive  chemicals to perform the reactions. In a paper published in the RSC journal  Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry, the chemists describe the waste vegetable  oil-to-biodiesel conversion in a single reaction vessel using environmentally  friendly catalysts and making the conversion six times faster than current  methods. In a separate yet related paper published in the ACS journal Energy & Fuels, a team led by Brown  chemistry professor Paul Williard has created a new technique to chart the  progress of the transesterification reaction in which virgin and waste oils are  converted into biodiesel fuel. The technique—DOSY, diffusion-ordered nuclear  magnetic resonance spectroscopy—observes virgin oil molecules as they shrink in  size and move faster in solution during the reaction. The reaction is complete  when all of the molecules have been converted into smaller components known as  fatty acid esters.

Comments yesterday by ACS President Joseph Francisco on the 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry have appeared in more than 3,000 news media outlets around the world with a potential audience of more than 1.5 billion people. Today’s coverage includes:

 

The Wall Street Journal (New York, N.Y.: daily circulation 2 million), USA Today (McLean, Va.: daily circulation 1.8 million), Time (New York, N.Y.: weekly circulation 3.36 million), CBS News (New York, N.Y.: 12.2 million monthly users), the Washington Post (Washington D.C.: daily circulation 578,482), the Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Ill.: daily circulation 516,032), Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 37.9 million monthly unique users), the Boston Globe (Boston, Mass.: daily circulation 232,432), MSNBC (New York, N.Y.: 39.9 million monthly unique users), Fox News (New York, N.Y.: 16.8 million monthly unique users), PBS NewsHour (Arlington, Va.: 1.1 million monthly unique users), the Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, Australia: daily circulation 212,700), the Age (Melbourne, Australia: daily circulation 197,500), the Seattle Times (Seattle, Wash.: daily circulation 263,588), Science News (Washington D.C.: bi-weekly circulation 130,000), National Public Radio (Washington D.C.: 3 million monthly unique users), New Scientist (London, England: weekly circulation 170,000), Bloomberg BusinessWeek (New York, N.Y.: weekly circulation 917,568), Discover Magazine (New York, N.Y.: monthly circulation 850,000), Nature News (London, England: weekly circulation 65,000), Canada.com (Toronto, Ontario: 5 million monthly unique users), the Montreal Gazette (Montreal, Quebec: daily circulation 141,000), the Austin American-Statesman (Austin, Tex.: daily circulation 151,520), the Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Atlanta, Ga.: daily circulation 195,592), the Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, Calif.: daily circulation 279,032), Zimbio (San Carlos, Calif.: 20.1 million monthly unique users) and the Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, Pa.: daily circulation 300,674).

 

A chemical kick-starter used in modern medicine, electronics and agriculture, was the catalyst for one American and two Japanese scientists to win the Nobel Prize in chemistry. The Royal Swedish Academy on Wednesday announced the award of its annual prize to chemists Richard Heck, 79, of the University of Delaware; Ei-ichi Negishi, 75, of Purdue University; and Akira Suzuki, 79, of Japan's Hokkaido University. They will equally share the $1.5 million prize, for creating, "one of the most sophisticated tools available to chemists today." "I would be telling you a lie if I said I was expecting the award," said Negishi at a news conference scheduled before his afternoon chemistry class for 300 sophomore students. "It was only a dream until today." Palladium catalysts allow for room-temperature creation of complex compounds in few steps on an industrial scale without unwanted byproducts. "This prize was just a matter of time," said Joseph Francisco, head of the American Chemical Society in Washington, D.C. "The reaction is just a fundamental thing found in the toolbox of every industrial chemist and the textbook of every chemistry student." Palladium catalysts serve as a matchmaker in forcing the carbon molecules to combine to make larger molecules. In reactions, the metal first latches onto the carbon atoms in small molecules, and squeezes itself out of the picture after wedding them.

 

Reuters (New York, N.Y.: “viewed by more than 1 billion monthly”)

“Wasted Food, Wasted Energy”

October 6, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) press release

 

The amount of food wasted each year by Americans represents the energy equivalent of 350 million barrels of oil, or about 2 percent of the nation's annual energy consumption, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Texas say it takes the equivalent of about 1.4 billion barrels of oil to produce, process, package, and transport a year's worth of food in the United   States - between 8 and 16 percent of the nation's total energy consumption. And, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates, about 27 percent of food is wasted in the U.S. each year, including 33 percent of fats and oils, 32 percent of dairy products, 31 percent of eggs, and 25 percent of vegetables, according to the study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

 

Discover Magazine (New York, N.Y.: monthly circulation 850,000)

“My, This Beer Has Some Delicious Proteins”

October 6, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

“Not all chemicals are bad,” wrote humor columnist Dave Barry. “Without chemicals such as hydrogen and oxygen, for example, there would be no way to make water, a vital ingredient in beer.” Barry may have been right about the virtues of a cold one, but his description is missing a few chemicals: the proteins from beer’s other main ingredients, starch (often from barley) and yeast. To better understand this intoxicating chemical recipe, researchers at the University of Milan have published an expanded proteome, or protein library, of their lager of choice in the Journal of Proteome Research. They used a method called combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, or CPLL, which involves running the beer through sticky beads to capture its proteins—even the ones that present at low levels. They turned up 20 proteins from barley, 40 from yeast and two from corn, a vast improvement on the previous proteome, which showed just 12 barley and two yeast proteins.

 

NaturalNews.com (Toronto, Ontario: 300,580 monthly unique users)

“Garlic oil shows protective effect against heart damage in diabetics”

October 7, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Diabetes isn't a disease that only impacts the pancreas and plays havoc with blood sugar levels -- it ups the risk for a host of other health problems, from damaged vision to nerve pain. And over 30 percent of diabetics in the U.S. have some kind of heart disease, too, according to statistics from the Framingham study. In addition to large vessel disease and accelerated atherosclerosis, diabetes is also associated with diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), which enlarges the heart and makes it more thick and rigid than normal. Complications from cardiomyopathy include heart failure, abnormal heart rhythms, fluid buildup in the lungs and legs and death. But new research just published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry shows a simple, natural therapy -- garlic oil -- may prevent this potentially deadly heart problem which inflames and weakens the heart muscle.

 

Chemical Industry & Employment

“Chemical Industry & Employment Outlook webinar”

October 6, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

The blog is pleased to have been invited by the American Chemical Society (ACS) to join its online panel discussion on "Chemical Industry & Employment Outlook: Trends 2010 and Beyond", taking place via webinar on Tuesday 2 November. Its co-panellists will be Pat Confalone, Vice-President, Global R&D, Du Pont; and Susan Butts, Senior Director of External Science and Technology Programs, The Dow Chemical Company.

 

… Broadcast News

 

National Public Radio (Washington D.C.: 32.7 million weekly listeners)

“American, 2 Japanese Share Nobel In Chemistry”

October 6, 2010

 

American Richard Heck and Japanese researchers Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki won the 2010 Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing a chemical method that has allowed scientists to make medicines and better electronics. The winners all worked independently and developed the chemical process honored this year — using palladium as a catalyst to form carbon-to-carbon bonds, specifically "palladium-catalyzed cross-couplings in organic synthesis" — over several years. Using palladium metal in the chemical reactions makes those carbon bonds happen "very easily, very cleanly," said Joseph Francisco, president of the American Chemical Society and a colleague of Negishi's at Purdue University. It requires fewer steps than previous methods and avoids having to clean up unwanted byproducts, he said.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Sharon Palmer

“The Magic of Mushrooms as Medicine”

October 6, 2010

 

Nothing compares to the earthy fragrance and taste of mushrooms freshly sautéed in a bit of olive oil and garlic. But did you know that mushrooms are far more special than their delicious taste suggests? The most popular mushroom in America, white or button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) contain an abundance of ergosterol, according to an April 2009 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The Australian research team reported that commercial production of button mushrooms enriched with vitamin D through exposure to sunlight might be a practical approach for improving consumer health.

 

Tx ETD Association

“More on the ACS Publication Agreement”

October 7, 2010

 

Scholarly Communications at Texas A&M University has posted a detailed commentary on the new ACS publication agreement that might be of interest to graduate schools and libraries alike. A brief excerpt is posted below: The American Chemical Society, publisher of some 40 scientific, peer-reviewed journals, has just announced that it is rolling out a new ACS Journal Publishing Agreement for each of its journals between October 11 and October 25. The new Publishing Agreement replaces the former “ACS Copyright Status Form” that was oft-criticized for its highly restrictive terms that prohibited authors from using their own content in research and instructional activities. The new agreement was devised with the input of “ACS journal authors, editors, librarians, governance members, and legal counsel” to expand author rights and clarify author responsibilities.

By 10 a.m. this morning, comments by ACS President Joseph Francisco on the 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry had appeared in more than 125 news media outlets around the world with a potential audience of more than one billion people. More coverage will appear tomorrow in ACS in the News. Today’s coverage includes:

 

The Associated Press (New York, N.Y.: publishes content from 700 newspapers and 5,000 television and radio broadcasts), Reuters (New York, N.Y.: “viewed by more than 1 billion monthly”), ABC News (New York, N.Y.: 12.2 million monthly unique users), the Huffington Post (New York, N.Y.: 29.2 million monthly unique users), the Denver Post (Denver, Colo.: daily circulation 707,000), the Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, Calif.: daily circulation 616,606), the London Telegraph (London, England: daily circulation 673,010), Scientific American (New York, N.Y.: monthly circulation 676,000), the Houston Chronicle (Houston, Tex.: daily circulation 494,131), Salon (San Francisco, Calif.: 4.2 million monthly unique users.), the San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, Calif.: daily circulation 241,330), NewsMax (West Palm Beach, Fla.: 4.6 million monthly unique users) and AOL News (New York, N.Y.: 2.8 million monthly unique users).

 

An American and two Japanese scientists won the 2010 Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing chemical methods widely used to make potential cancer drugs and other medicines, as well as slimmed-down computer screens. Richard Heck, Ei-ichi Negishi and Akira Suzuki were honored for their development four decades ago of one of the most sophisticated tools available to chemists today, called palladium-catalyzed cross couplings. It lets chemists join carbon atoms together, a key step in the process of building complex molecules. Their methods are now used worldwide in commercial production of pharmaceuticals and molecules used to make electronics, the Royal  Swedish Academy of Sciences said… The approach developed by the winners is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, in research labs and in commercial production of substances like plastics, said Joseph Francisco, president of the American Chemical Society and a colleague of Negishi's in Purdue's chemistry department. "It's truly quite fundamental work," he said. By using the metal palladium as a catalyst to make carbon atoms bond to each other, the approach makes those bonds happen "very easily, very cleanly," he said. It requires fewer steps than previous methods and avoids having to clean up unwanted byproducts, he said.

 

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia,  Pa.: daily circulation 288,298)

“Waste food? Waste energy”

October 5, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) press release

 

There are a lot of reasons not to waste food, beginning with the food itself. But now, scientists have calculated that a way the nation could immediately save 350 million barrels of oil a year is to stop wasting food. We could do it "without spending a penny or putting a ding in the quality of life," according to the American Chemical Society. The study, published in the society's semi-monthly journal, Environmental Science & Technology, showed that it takes the equivalent of about 1.4 billion barrels of oil to "produce, package, prepare, preserve and distribute a year’s worth of food in the United States." This amounts to 6 to 15 percent of energy consumption. Meanwhile, the Department of Agriculture estimates that about 27 percent of all food is wasted. The most-wasted food items -- racking up about 30 percent wasted -- are dairy products, grains, fats/oils, eggs, sugar and other sweeteners, according to the study.

 

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000)

“Building blocks of nanotechnology to be named National Historic Chemical Landmark”

October 5, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

The American Chemical Society (ACS) will honor the discovery of fullerenes, the scientific achievement that gave birth to nanotechnology, as a National Historic Chemical Landmark in a ceremony to be held at Rice University in Houston, Texas, on Oct. 11. Fullerenes are commonly called buckyballs, and they form the basis of nanotechnology, the field of engineering extremely small structures and devices. Nanotechnology has led to enormous research and product development opportunities in fields as diverse as antibiotics, superconductors and optics. "When Nobel Laureates Robert Curl, Harry Kroto, and Richard Smalley discovered buckyballs - a previously unknown molecular form of carbon - they changed the future of science," said ACS president Joseph S. Francisco, Ph.D. "We are proud to recognize these scientists. Their work expands our knowledge of pure science and it has created many practical applications."

 

MSNBC (New York, N.Y.: 39.9 million monthly unique users)

“Super yarn in works for space suits, bulletproof vests”

October 5, 2010

 

Super-strong, highly conductive yarns made from extraordinarily thin carbon tubes could one day find use in spacesuits, bulletproof vests and radiation suits, researchers now suggest. Carbon nanotubes are hollow pipes just nanometers or billionths of a meter in diameter — dozens to hundreds of times thinner than a wavelength of visible light. They can possess a range of extraordinary physical and electrical properties, such as being roughly 100 times stronger than steel at one-sixth the weight. Now scientists in China reveal they have made composite yarns from carbon nanotubes and plastic that are both very strong and electrically conductive. The researchers first wove pure carbon nanotube yarns as free of physical defects as possible, to ensure it had good electrical conductivity. They next impregnated a strengthening plastic into the empty spaces inside this yarn, using a solvent that did not leave any leftovers behind that would detract from the yarn's electrical properties. The scientists detailed their findings online September 10 in the journal ACS Nano.

 

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (Milwaukee, Wisc.: daily circulation 217,755)

“Supercomputer simulations help unravel the origins of life”

October 5, 2010

 

A research team at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is using supercomputer simulations to examine an organic chemical reaction that may have led ribonucleic acids evolve into early life forms. "Computer simulations can provide insight into biological systemcs that you can't get any other way," said Jeremy Smith, who directs Oak Ridge's Center for Molecular Biophysics. "Since these structures are changing so much, the dynamic aspects are difficult to understand, but simulation is a good way of doing it." Researchers focused on types of RNA called ribozymes which can store genetic information and catalyze chemical reactions, both of which are necessary for the formation of life. The study appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

 

PhsOrg.com (Evergreen, Va.: 1.3 million monthly unique users)

“Ozone damage of molecules in the lungs”

October 5, 2010

 

Lungs are lined with a mixture of molecules to ensure that they function well. For example, some of these help with the removal of inhaled particles. Retention of a moist film at the surface is also crucial. Recent work published in Langmuir provides important ideas as to how some of these molecules are affected by ozone that can arise as a pollutant in the atmosphere and is known to be a severe pulmonary irritant. The new study has focussed on phospholipids that are major components in both walls of biological cells and the fluid that covers the surface of the lungs. Simple measurements of layers of these molecules spread at a water surface suggested that a few ppm (parts per million) of ozone in oxygen can cause rapid degradation of a certain type of phospholipid followed, unexpectedly, by much slower changes over hours that arise from loss of the material from the surface.

 

Australian Food News (Victoria, Australia)

“GM soy linked to birth defects, cancer: new study”

October 6, 2010

 

Monsanto’s herbicide Roundup used on genetically manipulated (GM) Roundup Ready crops is linked to human cell death, birth defects, cancer and miscarriages, says a report released at the European Parliament by an international group of scientists. The report comes at a crucial time for Australia, where a popular infant soy formula has tested positive to unlabelled GM soy and corn, and Roundup Ready canola and cotton are grown. The report, “GM Soy: Sustainable? Responsible?”, highlights new research by Argentine government scientist Professor Andrés Carrasco and an international coalition of scientists. They found serious health impacts from Roundup’s active ingredient, glyphosate, other chemicals in the formulated herbicide and its breakdown products. The report also provides a global overview of scientific papers and other documents on the impacts of GM soy production. The new research is published in the American Chemical Society journal ‘Chemical Research in Toxicology’.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Genetics Times

“Reducing gene-damaging impurities in medicines”

October 5, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Drug manufacturers have been adjusting to strict new government standards that limit the amount of potentially harmful impurities in medicine, according to the cover story of the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), ACS' weekly newsmagazine. The impurities are "genotoxic," capable of damaging the DNA in genes. Although drug companies are complying with the guidelines, some regard the limits as too strict, the article notes.

 

NC State News Center

“Anastas believes science, technology offer ‘green’ solutions”

October 5, 2010

 

Today, most people have biochemical substances in their systems that weren’t even known before 1945, Dr. Paul Anastas of the Environmental Protection Agency told an audience at N.C. State University during the fifth Borlaug Lecture held Oct. 4. Known as the “Father of Green Chemistry,” Anastas told the audience that innovation is required to help society reduce its dependence on products and processes that rely on toxic substances. Anastas, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency assistant administrator for the Office of Research and Development, is known for his groundbreaking research on the design, manufacture and use of minimally toxic, environmentally friendly chemicals. Prior to joining the EPA, he was on the faculty of Yale University, served as founding director of the Green Chemistry Institute headquartered at the American Chemical Society and worked in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

Discovery News (Silver Spring, Md.: 9.7 million monthly unique users)

“Beer Gets Boost with Microbrew View”

October 4, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

A common brand of German beer was found to contain 54 types of proteins, more than four times the amount found in any other beer, a finding brought to light with a technique normally used in the biomedical field. Besides giving insight into what makes beer what it is, the technique could help beer drinkers learn more about what they’re buying. The findings could also help manufacturers detect contamination or make a foamier, clearer or otherwise better product. “This opens up a completely new horizon in beer analysis in general, and also in the analysis of any beverage,” said lead author Pier Giorgio Righetti, of the The Polytechnic Institute of Milan. “We are now analyzing a lot of other beverages and finding a lot of surprising things that producers don’t know are in their beverages.” In total, the team reported in the Journal of Proteome Research, they found 17 barley proteins, 2 corn proteins, and 35 yeast proteins. Different types of beer would likely contain different proteins, Righetti said.

 

Des Moines Register (Des Moines, Iowa: daily circulation 116,876)

“Save energy; eat leftovers”

October 4, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

[ABC News Radio (New York, N.Y.), Ars Technica (San Francisco, Calif.: 1.5 million monthly unique users), Inhabitat (New York, N.Y.: 783,400 monthly unique users) and KBOI News/Talk 670 (Boise, Idaho: 4,500 monthly unique users), also covered the item.]

 

We used to be made guilty about throwing away food by the specter of starving children in India (or numerous other places). There’s still starvation in today’s world, but now we have another reason to not throw away food; it wastes energy. An article in the journal Environmental Science and Technology reports that the U.S. wastes the equivalent of 350 million barrels of oil per year that are used to produce the estimated 27 percent of all food that is wasted or thrown away. Researchers Michael Webber and Amanda Cuéllar of the University of Texas, who authored the article, note that food contains energy and requires energy to produce, process, and transport. Estimates indicate that between 8 and 16 percent of energy consumption in the United States went toward food production in 2007. The article states that Americans waste 33 percent of fats and oils they prepare and 31 percent of sweets.

 

Examiner.com (Denver, Colo.: 13.9 million monthly unique users)

“American Chemical Society - climate change resources”

October 4, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

The American Chemical Society (ACS) today posted a new online collection of resources related to climate change on October 1, 2010, including audio and visual presentations from a recent ACS forum on the science of climate change and video from an ACS press briefing on this forum. The forum featured four world-class experts who discussed the state of the science and the importance of dealing with this issue in a scientifically informed manner. The climate experts and their presentations include Michael McElroy, Ph.D., Professor of Environmental Studies, Harvard University and James McCarthy, Ph.D., Professor of Biological Oceanography, Harvard  University.

 

Yahoo! Shine (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 7.5 million monthly unique users)

“Trying to lose weight? Drink more water”

October 4, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

Forget diet pills and cleanses. A new study suggests that an effective weight-loss aid is available straight from your kitchen sink. Drinking two 8-ounce glasses of water before breakfast, lunch, and dinner while also cutting back on portions may help you lose weight and keep it off for at least a year, according to research presented today at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, in Boston. "As part of a prudent, low-calorie weight-loss diet, adding water may help with weight-loss success," says Brenda Davy, Ph.D., the lead author of the study and an associate professor of nutrition at Virginia Tech, in Blacksburg. Dietitians have long recommended drinking water as a way to shed pounds, but little research has been done to confirm this conventional wisdom, the researchers say. Though small, Davy's study is the first randomized controlled trial to examine the benefits of "preloading" with water before meals.

 

Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.6 million monthly unique users)

“Powerful Supercomputer Peers Into the Origin of Life”

October 4, 2010

 

Supercomputer simulations at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are helping scientists unravel how nucleic acids could have contributed to the origins of life. A research team led by Jeremy Smith, who directs ORNL's Center for Molecular Biophysics and holds a Governor's Chair at University of Tennessee, used molecular dynamics simulation to probe an organic chemical reaction that may have been important in the evolution of ribonucleic acids, or RNA, into early life forms. Certain types of RNA called ribozymes are capable of both storing genetic information and catalyzing chemical reactions -- two necessary features in the formation of life. The research team looked at a lab-grown ribozyme that catalyzes the Diels-Alder reaction, which has broad applications in organic chemistry. The research was published as "Magnesium-Dependent Active-Site Conformational Selection in the Diels-Alderase Ribozyme" in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

 

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000)

“Rensselaer professors Dordick and Interrante named ACS Fellows”

October 4, 2010

 

Two Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute professors have been named 2010 fellows of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Director of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS) and the Howard P. Isermann '42 Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering Jonathan Dordick and Professor Emeritus of Chemistry Leonard Interrante were both recognized by the ACS for their "outstanding achievements in and contributions to the science, the profession, and service to the society." "Both of these esteemed researchers and educators have had a major impact on their fields," said Rensselaer Provost Robert Palazzo. "Dr. Dordick is among the foremost biocatalysis and bioengineering experts in the world. His recent discovery of antibacterial coatings could protect thousands of people from harmful bacterial infections and his work to develop biochip technologies is transforming the way we view the modern drug discovery process. "Dr. Interrante is both a polymer pioneer and successful entrepreneur. He has developed sophisticated new materials utilized in technologies around the world, including the Hubble Space Telescope. His pure silicon carbide-forming polymer is the only of its kind commercially available in the world, paving the way for an entirely new generation of high-temperature, high-strength ceramic composites." The ACS honored the new fellows at the society's fall national meeting.

 

BYU News (Provo, Utah)

“BYU offers events for National Chemistry Week Oct. 19-23”

October 4, 2010

 

Brigham Young  University’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is offering the community a chance to go “Behind the Scenes With Chemistry” during a weeklong celebration held at various campus locations Tuesday through Saturday, Oct. 19–23. The event, held in conjunction with National Chemistry Week and in association with the Central Utah section of the American Chemical Society, will include science exhibits and activities for people of all ages and interests. Chemistry magic shows will be held in W111 and W112 Ezra Taft Benson Building during the week to illustrate principles of chemistry through entertaining demonstrations. A series of lectures called “Chemistry in the Movies” will use popular cinema to delve into science Thursday, Oct. 21, in W140 Benson Building.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Everything about Diabetes

“Garlic May Prevent Heart Disease in People with Diabetes”

October 5, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Many studies have explored the health benefits of garlic, but few have looked at its impact on a form of heart disease that affects people who have diabetes. Now the results of a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry indicate that garlic has “significant potential” for preventing diabetic cardiomyopathy. Authors of the new study point out that people who have diabetes have at least a twofold risk of dying from heart disease. Specifically, diabetics are susceptible to diabetic cardiomyopathy, in which the heart tissue is inflamed and weakened in response to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels).

 

Oz Garcia

“Turmeric May Help Prevent Osteoporosis”

October 4, 2010

 

I have been touting the health benefits of turmeric for years. In fact, 5 years ago, I formulated a beverage where turmeric was the key ingredient. For centuries, turmeric has been used in Ayurvedic medicine as a treatment for a variety of problems, from stomach pain to arthritis. Past studies have touted this yellow spice’s anti-inflammatory effect, but nothing as conclusive as this new report. I just finished reading a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, that detailed the health benefits of turmeric and how it can prevent osteoporosis. In the research conducted out of The University of Arizona, turmeric proved an effective resource for preventing osteoporosis, bone loss, which is a significant concern for postmenopausal women, among others.

AOL News (New York, N.Y.: 3.1 million monthly unique users)

“Study: US Food Waste Is a Huge Energy Drain”

October 2, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) press release

 

[Twenty-five other media outlets, including Oneindia (Bangalore, India: 7.3 million monthly unique users, Treehugger (New York, N.Y.: 2.2 million monthly unique users, the Baltimore Sun (Baltimore, Md.: daily circulation 201,830) and Science Daily (Rockville, Md.: 3.6 million monthly unique users), also covered the news.]

 

Forget drafty windows and aging cars -- a new study says one of the biggest wastes of energy in America could be the food in your garbage can. Every rotten tomato or unwanted chicken wing represents wasted energy, since the calories in the food are never consumed. And the energy that went into growing the food, processing it, packaging it and transporting it to the consumer is also wasted. Each year, American food waste represents the energy equivalent of 350 million barrels of oil, according to new research from the University of Texas. That's enough to power the whole country for a week -- just sitting in the trash can rotting. "As a nation we're grappling with energy issues," Michael Webber, associate director of the university's Center for International Energy and Environmental Policy, told AOL News. "A lot more energy goes into food than people realize." This isn't small potatoes on a global level either. Agriculture is a major contributor to climate change, with the U.S. agricultural sector representing about 7 percent of the country's total greenhouse gas emissions in 2008, even before taking into account the energy used to process and transport the food. (Environmental Science & Technology)

 

Examiner.com (Denver, Colo.: 13.9 million monthly unique users)

“BP Oil Spill - learning from Exxon Valdez”

October 1, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Traces of crude oil that linger on the shores of Alaska's Prince William Sound after the Exxon Valdez oil spill remain highly biodegradable, despite almost 20 years of weathering and decomposition, scientists are reporting in a new study. Their findings, which appear in ACS' semi-monthly journal Environmental Science & Technology, suggest a simple approach for further cleaning up remaining traces of the Exxon Valdez spill the largest in U.S. waters until the 2010 Deepwater Horizon episode. Albert D. Venosa and colleagues note that bacteria, evaporation, sunlight, and other items in Mother's Nature's clean-up kit work together to break down the oil and make it disappear. The scientists collected oil-contaminated soil from different beaches in Prince William Sound and treated the samples with phosphorus and nitrogen fertilizer in the presence of excess oxygen from the air. Oil in the fertilized samples biodegraded up to twice as fast as oil in the unfertilized control samples, but significant biodegradation occurred even in the unfertilized controls. The results showed that oxygen supply was the major bottleneck, or limiting factor, in the field that prevented further decomposition of the oil.

 

EmaxHealth (Hickory, N.C.: 140,400 monthly unique users)

“Garlic May Prevent Heart Disease in People with Diabetes”

October 3, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

[Medical News Today (U.K.: 1.1 million monthly unique users) also carried the story.]

 

Many studies have explored the health benefits of garlic, but few have looked at its impact on a form of heart disease that affects people who have diabetes. Now the results of a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry indicate that garlic has “significant potential” for preventing diabetic cardiomyopathy. Authors of the new study point out that people who have diabetes have at least a twofold risk of dying from heart disease. Specifically, diabetics are susceptible to diabetic cardiomyopathy, in which the heart tissue is inflamed and weakened in response to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). In 2003 in Diabetes Care, a report on diabetic cardiomyopathy noted that because the disease “is now known to have a high prevalence in the asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patient, screening for its presence at the earliest stage of development would be appropriate in order to prevent the progression to CHF (congestive heart failure).

 

Reuters (New York, N.Y.: “viewed by more than 1 billion monthly”)

“Leti Demonstrates the Integration of CMOS-Compatible Plasmonic Optical Waveguides with Silicon Photonic Devices”

October 1, 2010

 

CEA-Leti, a leading European research and development institute in the field of silicon photonics technology, today announced that it has demonstrated the efficient integration of silicon photonic devices with fully complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-compatible plasmonic optical waveguides. This new capability sets the stage for the fabrication of smaller, faster and more efficient opto-electronic interfaces, which could ultimately allow the development of significantly higher-performance sensors, computer chips and other electronic components. The plasmonic-optical devices were designed and fabricated by Leti, which collaborated with France’s Université de Technologie de Troyes (UTT) for additional near-field scanning optical microscope testing and characterization. The project results were presented earlier this month at the Group Four Photonics 2010 show in Beijing, and published in Nano Letters, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

 

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, Calif.: 11 million monthly unique users)

“Professor Dr. Alexander (Sandy) Lawson is Awarded the 2011 Herman Skolnik Award”

October 4, 2010

 

Elsevier Properties SA today congratulated its Research and Development Director, Professor Dr. Alexander (Sandy) Lawson, for receiving the 2011 Herman Skolnik Award. Presented by the American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Chemical Information (CINF), the award recognizes outstanding contributions to and achievements in the theory and practice of chemical information science and related disciplines. The prize consists of a $3,000 honorarium and a plaque, which Sandy will receive following a symposium scheduled for the ACS Fall National Meeting in Denver, Aug. 28-Sept. 1, 2011, during the International Year of Chemistry. Sandy will also be one of the symposium presenters.

 

The Plain-Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio: daily circulation 291,630)

“A. Schulman promotes two managers: On the Go”

October 3, 2010

 

A. Schulman Inc.: Gustavo Perez was appointed general manager and chief operating officer of the Americas and Derek Bristow as general manager and chief operating officer of Asia, for the Fairlawn plastic additives company. American Chemical Society: Robert Weiss was named a fellow. Weiss is the Hezzleton E. Simmons professor of engineering at the University  of Akron.

 

Westminster News (Salt Lake City,  Utah: 13,200 monthly unique users)

“Westminster Helps Kick Off National Chemistry Week”

October 1, 2010

 

The Salt Lake City section of the American Chemical Society, in partnership with Westminster College, will observe National Chemistry Week on Oct. 9, 2010, with a public event at the Salt Lake City Library, Main Branch, at 10:30 a.m. The event is free and open to children of all ages. This year’s theme, “Behind the Scenes with Chemistry,” gives families an opportunity to learn about the mystery behind effects that seem magical, as well as provides hands-on art and science projects. Projects will demonstrate the science and chemistry behind special effects that are used in television and film. Other activities will explain the mystery of color changing and shape changing effects. In total, there will be 20 different activities to engage children and family members of all ages. The kick-off event will also include a science magic show.

 

North American Press Syndicate (New York, N.Y.: 3,015 monthly unique users)

“Contest Corner”

October 2, 2010

 

If your kids have ever watched a movie or TV show and asked, “Wow, how did they do that?” they may be interested to learn that many seemingly magical special effects are really chemistry at work. You can help children learn more about chemistry and special effects by participating in National Chemistry Week (NCW) 2010. As part of this year’s celebration, the American Chemical Society (ACS) is hosting a national poster contest for kids from kindergarten to 12th grade. Invite students to create a poster that celebrates the theme “Behind the Scenes with Chemistry.” Anyone can join in the celebration of NCW 2010 and get ready to celebrate the International Year of Chemistry 2011 (IYC 2011) by visiting www.acs.org/iyc2011.

 

The Daily Tar Heel (Chapel Hill,  N.C.: 3,800 monthly unique users)

“Chemistry magazine ranks doctoral program in top 10”

October 4, 2010

 

The doctoral program in chemistry is one of the top in the nation, according to the magazine Chemical & Engineering News. The magazine analyzed data from the National Research Council. The release of the survey data was highly anticipated, with the council assessing doctorate programs at 212 colleges and universities in the U.S.

 

… From the Blogs

 

Green Car Congress

“American Chemical Society Posts Online Collection of New Resources on Climate Change”

October 4, 2010

 

The American Chemical Society (ACS) has posted a new online collection of resources related to climate change, including audio and visual presentations from a recent ACS forum on the science of climate change and video from an ACS press briefing on this forum. The forum featured four experts who discussed the state of the science and the importance of dealing with this issue in a scientifically informed manner

 

Front Side Bus

“Crystal cantilever lifts objects 600 times its own weight”

October 1, 2010

 

For a long time, scientists have been trying to transform the collective movements of tiny molecules into useful mechanical work. With this goal in mind, a team of researchers from Japan has developed a crystal cantilever that exhibits reversible bending upon alternate irradiation with ultraviolet (UV) and visible light. They’ve demonstrated that the crystal cantilever can lift metal balls that weigh up to 600 times more than the cantilever itself. Masakazu Morimoto and Masahiro Irie from Rikkyo University in Tokyo, Japan, and the Japan Science and Technology Agency have published their study on the crystals in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (Milwaukee, Wisc.: daily circulation 217,755)

“Scientists seek the proteins that make beer yummy”

September 30, 2010

Origin: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) PressPac

 

Scientists in Italy have answered a powerful question by deciphering the set of proteins that make up one of the world's most popular beverages: beer. Reporting in the monthly Journal of Proteome Research, Italian scientists identified 20 barley proteins, 40 proteins from yeast and two proteins from corn. The study led by Pier Giorgio Righetti said, "These findings might help brewers in devising fermentation processes in which the release of yeast proteins could be minimized, if such components could alter the flavor of beer, or maximized in case of species improving a beer's aroma." A few months ago Righetti authored a separate study reporting on the proteins found in a glass of red wine.

 

Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, Australia: daily circulation 207,013)

“Call me crazy, but the school building program is turning boys into girls”

September 30, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

[The Age (Melbourne, Australia: daily circulation 197,500) and The Brisbane Times (Brisbane,  Australia: 120,000 monthly unique users) also covered the item.]

 

There was a small flurry of aghastness recently when primary school canteens were exposed as serial breachers of government healthy-food nazism. By ''healthy'', here, we mean essentially non-fattening, worried as we are that before they hit 30 the roly-poly little dears will blow the nation's entire health budget on diabetes, heart disease, joint replacement and fully funded lap-banding. But from the child's-eye view, as I recall it, the whole point of the school lunch-order is to eat forbidden trash… Xenestrogens are industrially synthesised compounds - chemicals, in a word - that are not estrogen but have estrogen-like effects. They are in almost everything, from petrol fumes to food additives to sunscreens to plastics (especially food packaging) to drinking water (which may also contain actual estrogen, which so many women ingest daily either as the pill or hormone replacement). It's like feminism's revenge; our whole environment is becoming estrogen-soaked. A 2008 study published in the Chemical Research in Toxicology journal found that two chemicals in particular - propyl gallate and 4-hexylresorcinol - were estrogen-mimickers, likely to be acting as endocrine disrupters in the food chain. It concluded that "some caution should be issued for [their use] as food additives". Far from using caution, however, we gaily add these chemicals to cosmetics, hair products, food packaging and food itself. They're in edible fats, oils, mayonnaise, shortening, baked goods, candy, dried meat, fresh pork sausage, dried milk and throat lozenges.

 

United Press International (Washington D.C.: 1.6 million monthly unique users)

“Garlic oil aids in diabetic heart disease”

September 30, 2010

Origin: OPA PressPac

 

Garlic oil shows a protective effect against diabetic cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease in people with diabetes, researchers in Taiwan say. Wei-Wen Kuo of the China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan, and colleagues say people with diabetes have at least twice the risk of death from heart disease as others -- heart disease accounts for 80 percent of all diabetes-related deaths. The scientists fed either garlic oil or corn oil to laboratory rats with diabetes. Animals given garlic oil experienced beneficial changes associated with protection against heart damage. The changes appeared to be associated with the potent antioxidant properties of garlic oil. The researchers identified more than 20 substances in garlic oil that may contribute to this protective effect. "In conclusion, garlic oil possesses significant potential for protecting hearts from diabetes-induced cardiomyopathy," the study authors say in a statement. The findings are published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

 

Reuters (New York, N.Y.: “viewed by more than 1 billion monthly”)

“Airgas to Host Session at Rubber Expo 2010 & 178th Technical Meeting on Characterization of Splits in Rubber Parts - Cryogenic versus Melt-flow Fronts”

September 30, 2010

 

Airgas, Inc. will host a session on identifying the root cause of split-related defects in molded rubber parts during the American Chemical Society Rubber Division’s Rubber Expo 2010 & 178th Technical Meeting to be held October 12 – 14, 2010 at the Frontier Airlines Center (formerly Midwest Airlines Center), Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The presentation will be given on Tuesday, October 12 at 10:30 a.m. in Room 203B by Donald Madda, program manager for industrial cryogenics within the Engineering Solutions Group of Airgas Merchant Gases. “Identifying the cause of split-related defects in molded rubber parts is the critical step in correcting the problem,” Madda said. “Our presentation is designed to help manufacturers of rubber products determine whether a split defect is caused by cryogenic processing or whether it is simply exposed by cryogenic processing. Splits caused by typical cryogenic processing exhibit different physical characteristics at the split compared to the physical characteristics of flow front problems that may occur during filling of the mold cavity.”

 

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, N.J.: monthly circulation 80,000)

“American Chemical Society Webinar focuses on careers in intellectual property for chemists”

September 30, 2010

Origin: OPA press release

 

News media and others interested in the chemical sciences are invited to join the next in a series of American Chemical Society (ACS) Webinars™ focusing on building a career that combines chemistry and intellectual property (IP). Scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 7, from 2 - 3 p.m. EDT, the free ACS Webinar™ will feature Robert J. Koch, an attorney with the Washington, D.C., law firm of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP, speaking on Careers in Intellectual Property for Chemists. Participants will learn: The three most available paths to move from the lab, industry or the classroom into the IP field, How knowledge of chemistry and/or lab experiences may fit into the vastly different worlds of patent procurement and patent enforcement, Which IP positions are in urgent need of technically qualified people and which IP fields show high prospects for future demands and Why it's never too late for a chemist to enter into the IP arena.

 

Medical News Today (U.K.: 1.1 million monthly unique users)

“Growing Nanowires Horizontally Yields New Benefit: 'Nano-LEDs'”

October 1, 2010

 

While refining their novel method for making nanoscale wires, chemists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) discovered an unexpected bonus - a new way to create nanowires that produce light similar to that from light-emitting diodes (LEDs). These "nano-LEDs" may one day have their light-emission abilities put to work serving miniature devices such as nanogenerators or lab-on-a-chip systems... In recent work published in ACS Nano, Babak Nikoobakht and Andrew Herzing increased the thickness of the gold catalyst nanoparticle from less than 8 nanometers to approximately 20 nanometers. The change resulted in nanowires that grew a secondary structure, a shark-like "dorsal fin" (referred to as a "nanowall") where the zinc oxide portion is electron-rich and the gallium nitride portion is electron-poor. The interface between these two materials - known as a p-n heterojunction - allows electrons to flow across it when the nanowire-nanowall combination was charged with electricity. In turn, the movement of electrons produced light and led the researchers to dub it a "nano LED."

 

KSAL News (Salina, Kan.)

“Scientist to Speak About Origin of Life”

September 30, 2010

 

A renowned scientist will speak at K-State Salina about the search for the origin of life. Donald M. Burland, former executive officer and acting director of the National Science Foundation's Division of Chemistry, will present "What Happened in That 'Warm Little Pond': The Search for the Molecular Origins of Life" at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 12, in the College Center Conference Room at Kansas State University at Salina. His presentation is on the history of the quest for the origin of life and provides possible answers to common questions: Will it ever be possible to know how life started? How can we determine when an area is worth investigating and when it is beyond current scientific prowess? What short-term advances will be made in this pursuit? The lecture is part of the American Chemical Society National Tour Speaker Presentation and is hosted by the American Chemical Society-Wichita section. It is free and open to the public.

 

Nanowerk (Honolulu, Hawaii: 91,500 monthly unique users)

“Hydrogen fuel for thought”

September 30, 2010

 

New research by Rice University scientists suggests that a class of material known as metallacarborane could store hydrogen at or better than benchmarks set by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program for 2015. The work could receive wide attention as hydrogen comes into play as a fuel of the future for cars, in fuel cells and by industry. The new study by Rice theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and his colleagues, which appears in the online Journal of the American Chemical Society, taps the power of transition metals scandium and titanium to hold a load of hydrogen molecules -- but not so tightly that they can't be extracted. A matrix made of metallacarboranes would theoretically hold up to 8.8 percent of its weight in hydrogen atoms, which would at least meet and perhaps surpass DOE milestones issued a year ago for cars that would run on hydrogen fuel.

 

… From the Blogs

 

The Gifted Corner

“The Magic of Chemistry at Roanoke College”

September 30, 2010

 

Dr. Gail Steehler will be presenting the Magic of Chemistry this Saturday, October 2,  2:00 p.m. in Massengill Auditorium at Roanoke College.  There will be amazing demonstrations to delight the whole family with fantastic colors, illusions, and explosions!  Be entertained, learn a little chemistry, and enjoy your liquid nitrogen ice cream. This event is sponsored by the Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society and the Chemistry Department.

 

Dr. Emily Kane

“October natural health news you can use”

September 30, 2010

Origin: OPA National Meeting press release

 

A study has found that a gene in a specific virus can turn adult stem cells into fat cells. The study shows that many cases of obesity can be blamed on a specific virus named “human adenovirus-36 (Ad-36)”. This does not mean that obesity is always the result of a particular virus; but it does suggest that many cases of obesity may stem from infection by this virus. This study was presented at the 234th annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Boston.