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Many in the wastewater field lament the fact that the development of toilets and water carriage flushed in an era of massive clean water use simply for moving poop around. Part 2 of the History illustrates the development of toilet technology.

 

A Brief (Illustrated) History of Human Waste Disposal -- and its possible future.

Part 1. Cesspits & Outhouses
Part 2. Toilets & Water Carriage
(attached pps)
Part 3. Sewerage
Part 4. Sewage Treatment
Part 5. Wastewater Treatment
Part 6. The Future: Wastewater Reclamation

 

Interested in the history of analyses of water and wastewater?

 

     What parameters were first measured to detect contamination of drinking water supplies?

     What was the first APHA Standard Method of Water Analysis?

The following is a six-part series of not-too-serious slide shows chronicling the evolution of human waste disposal practices - and their possible future.

 

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A Brief (Illustrated) History of Human Waste Disposal

Part 1. Cesspits & Outhouses
Part 2. Toilets & Water Carriage
Part 3. Sewerage
Part 4. Sewage Treatment
Part 5. Wastewater Treatment
Part 6. The Future: Wastewater Reclamation

 

These slide shows were presented at the venerable Missouri Water and Wastewater Conference in October, 2010.

(MWWC is primarily an organization of water and wastewater plant operators.)

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Water Fountain - Sicily

 

The evolving, tragicomic slide show, The Story of Bottled Water, explores the phenomenal growth of the industry, the recent challenges to its adverse environmental impacts, and some of the extremes reached in the creative marketing of packaged water. To this day, the story continues.

 

My interest in bottled water developed in 1980 after I obtained 101 finished drinking waters from Missouri public water supplies and analyzed them for total organic carbon (using the newly introduced low-level TOC analyzer) and total bacterial cell counts (using epfluorescent microscopy). I compared the results with waters then being sold in glass, often colored glass, bottles. Thereafter, friends and associates began bringing me bottles of water from an increasing array of venues. Tracking the development and marketing of these products then became a hobby.

 

Full disclosure. I drink tap water.

 

John O'Connor

 

 

The Story of Bottled Water has been updated. The original file has been removed and a modified Story is now appended.

 

 

We are grateful to those who take the time to make comments, offer corrections and share insights.