• PressPac: Suburban sprawl accounts for half of U.S. household carbon footprint

    Here’s an item from this week’s PressPac that we thought you’d enjoy. The PressPac features summaries of articles appearing in our peer-reviewed journals and Chemical & Engineering News. To get t...
    Christine Suh
    last modified by Christine Suh
  • PressPac: Finally, a way to authenticate premium chocolate

    Here’s an item from this week’s PressPac that we thought you’d enjoy. The PressPac features summaries of articles appearing in our peer-reviewed journals and Chemical & Engineering News. To get t...
    Christine Suh
    last modified by Christine Suh
  • PressPac: Green space can make people happier for years

    Here’s an item from this week’s PressPac that we thought you’d enjoy. The PressPac features summaries of articles appearing in our peer-reviewed journals and Chemical & Engineering News. To get t...
    Christine Suh
    last modified by Christine Suh
  • PressPac: First plant-based ‘microswimmers’ could propel drugs to the right location

    Here’s an item from this week’s PressPac that we thought you’d enjoy. The PressPac features summaries of articles appearing in our peer-reviewed journals and Chemical & Engineering News. To get t...
    Christine Suh
    last modified by Christine Suh
  • PressPac: Toward lowering titanium’s cost and environmental footprint

    Here’s an item from this week’s PressPac that we thought you’d enjoy. The PressPac features summaries of articles appearing in our peer-reviewed journals and Chemical & Engineering News. To get t...
    Christine Suh
    last modified by Christine Suh
  • PressPac: Reducing the salt in bread without losing saltiness, thanks to a texture trick

    Here’s an item from this week’s PressPac that we thought you’d enjoy. The PressPac features summaries of articles appearing in our peer-reviewed journals and Chemical & Engineering News. To get t...
    Christine Suh
    last modified by Christine Suh
  • PressPac: Packaging insulin into a pill-friendly form for diabetes treatment

    Here’s an item from this week’s PressPac that we thought you’d enjoy. The PressPac features summaries of articles appearing in our peer-reviewed journals and Chemical & Engineering News. To get t...
    Christine Suh
    last modified by Christine Suh
  • PressPac: Personal care products possible sources of parabens for babies

    Here’s an item from this week’s PressPac that we thought you’d enjoy. The PressPac features summaries of articles appearing in our peer-reviewed journals and Chemical & Engineering News. To get t...
    Christine Suh
    last modified by Christine Suh
  • PressPac: Silkworms spin colored silks while on a ‘green’ diet

    Here’s an item from this week’s PressPac that we thought you’d enjoy. The PressPac features summaries of articles appearing in our peer-reviewed journals and Chemical & Engineering News. To get t...
    Christine Suh
    last modified by Christine Suh
  • Flowers & Power: Getting rid of bugs without pesticides

    Bugs are a big problem. They spread diseases, and people also can develop allergies to them. And, of course, they’re icky.   They often are a really huge problem in densely populated, urban, low-income pub...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • The Food Court:This one is not for the birds

    Sunflower seeds. Sesame seeds. Caraway seeds. Rye seeds. Pumpkin seeds. Surely, there must be an edible seed for everyone’s taste. Un-hulled sunflower seeds are a baseball player’s delight. Rye, caraway an...
    Michael Bernstein
    last modified by Michael Bernstein
  • The Medical Bond: New bandage is just like a scab

    Before I rammed my knee into the sharp edge of my desk a few weeks ago, I hadn’t had a scab in years — decades, even. Scabs are unsightly, but they are really important in protecting an open wound against ...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • Flowers & Power: Absorbing a new, environmentally friendly use for cotton

    Check the dictionary for the definition of versatile. You won’t find “cotton” there, and that’s a shame. Here are just some of the products that come from this worthy plant: textile and yarn ...
    Michael Bernstein
    last modified by Michael Bernstein
  • The Medical Bond: Welding tissues instead of getting stitches during surgery

    For many types of surgery or for a bad cut on the skin, stitches are just fine. They bring the tissues together and speed up the healing process. But for some types of surgeries, you really need something better&mdash...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • Flowers & Power: Fast pollution test could keep beaches open more often

    Ah, nothing like heading out to the beach in the summer. The warm sun on your skin, the hot sand between your toes, the waves crashing around you.   Unfortunately, the water isn’t always as pristine as it ...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • The Food Court:  The time is ripe for a new way to preserve fruits, veggies

    This can’t be true, but it does seem like bananas and avocadoes start ripening the moment you put them into your shopping bag. Within just a few days, these fruits and vegetables turn an overripe brown. It takes...
    Michael Bernstein
    last modified by Michael Bernstein
  • The Medical Bond: BRAIN initiative to better understand the brain

    The typical human brain weighs less than 3 pounds, is pinkish-beige in color and has the consistency of gelatin. It’s a crinkly thing, with lots of folds on its surface. Not that impressive. It’s actually ...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • Flowers & Power: Preserving China’s famous Terracotta Warriors and other relics

    You never know what you’re going to find when you go digging. In 1974, a group of farmers digging a well stunned the world with their discovery of the now-famous Terracotta Warriors and Horses in China.   ...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • The Medical Bond: Using photosynthesis to make medicines and other useful substances

    Plants are amazing chemical factories. They take sunlight and use it and carbon dioxide to make energy for themselves. They also make oxygen, which we breathe. But they also make substances that can help heal us. Trad...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • The Food Court:  A new selection for the gluten-free menu

    Here are some unpalatable statistics: A total of 1.8 million Americans have celiac disease and nearly as many –– 1.4 million –– don’t know they have it. And ponder this: Nearly five times...
    Michael Bernstein
    last modified by Michael Bernstein