• The Medical Bond: Using photosynthesis to make medicines and other useful substances

    Plants are amazing chemical factories. They take sunlight and use it and carbon dioxide to make energy for themselves. They also make oxygen, which we breathe. But they also make substances that can help heal us. Trad...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • The Food Court:  A new selection for the gluten-free menu

    Here are some unpalatable statistics: A total of 1.8 million Americans have celiac disease and nearly as many –– 1.4 million –– don’t know they have it. And ponder this: Nearly five times...
    Michael Bernstein
    last modified by Michael Bernstein
  • If the Model Suggests Link between Intelligence and Entropy....

    If the Model Suggests Link between Intelligence and Entropy, http://physics.aps.org/articles/v6/46 is my *maximization of entropy* a smart thing?
    Joseph Sabol
    last modified by Joseph Sabol
  • Flowers & Power: Scratchy, cheap jute fibers can make concrete stronger — sustainably

    Jute, that scratchy, stiff vegetable fiber used to make burlap sacks and twine, could have a brand-new use in the near future. According to a study in Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, it could serve as...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • The Food Court: This product of the olive is no snake oil

    Olive oil, that cooking liquid so popular today with chefs at home and in restaurants, hasn’t always been a culinary staple. There was a time when one of the few places you would find it was as a partner with re...
    Michael Bernstein
    last modified by Michael Bernstein
  • The Medical Bond: Hidden mold toxins lurk in some foods

    Aside from some molds growing on “stinky” cheeses, molds are generally not good for human consumption. For example, we all know to stay away from bread with tell-tale green spots or white cottony threads o...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • Flowers & Power: Those used coffee grounds are good sources of healthful antioxidants

    We’ve all heard how coffee is good for you. Recent studies have linked drinking coffee with a lower risk for developing many conditions, including type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • The Food Court: Unholy smoke! Stay away from my wine

    It’s pretty easy to fit the millions of people who drink wine into categories. They love red and hate white, or vice versa, or they like both kinds of wine. Taking it to another level, when it comes to the art o...
    Michael Bernstein
    last modified by Michael Bernstein
  • The Medical Bond: Mussels help scientists fight tooth sensitivity

    A substance in the sticky goo that mussels use to glom on to rocks and other surfaces could help ease tooth sensitivity. That’s welcome news to my ears — well, to my sensitive teeth!   Like 74 percen...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • Flowers & Power: A sustainable way to make a whale-vomit substitute used in perfumes

    Yes, whale vomit — although some experts suspect that this smelly, grayish, waxy intestinal secretion actually comes from the other end of the whale. It’s actually been known throughout the ages as an aphr...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • The Food Court: An explosion of nutrition and flavor

    Believe it or not, in those simpler days long ago, there was a buzz of excitement when the cereal mavens first dropped a handful of plump raisins into a box of breakfast flakes. For decades, breakfast-eaters only had ...
    Michael Bernstein
    last modified by Michael Bernstein
  • The Medical Bond: Celiac patients eating bread? Perhaps someday soon…

    Scientists report that someday soon, celiac patients might not need to go down the special “gluten-free” aisle of the grocery store anymore. They are making progress toward a pill that could allow celiac p...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • Flowers & Power: Taking greenhouse gases out of the Internet

    Scientists are taking steps to cut down on greenhouse gas emissions of the Internet and telecommunications industries? Huh? Who knew doing a Google search produced greenhouse gases, thereby contributing to climate cha...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • The Food Court: Box wine: Cooler is better

    To some people, it seems, the container is nearly as important as what it contains. Take beer and wine. Some time back, a bottle of a Portuguese rosé wine adorned book shelves across the United States.  Th...
    Michael Bernstein
    last modified by Michael Bernstein
  • The Medical Bond: Psychoactive substance exposes users to direct carcinogens

    People have chewed or smoked plants to achieve “highs” almost since time began. Sure, some people use psychoactive substances recreationally to escape the pressures of their lives. But they are also someti...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • Flowers & Power: Potentially toxic flame retardants found in many home couches

    Every year, about 3,500 people die in fires in the U.S. Firefighters responded to almost 400,000 house fires in 2010. Common causes of house fires are overloaded electrical outlets, portable heaters, knocked over cand...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • Flowers & Power: Diarrhea medicine ingredient expands from the pharmacy to the farm

    A nutrient-rich clay long used to treat diarrhea might help to solve a problem related to the *ahem* other end of the digestive tract. A new report shows that the mineral attapulgite could be useful as a sustainable s...
    Sam Lemonick
    last modified by Sam Lemonick
  • The Food Court: Keeping ahead of the curve for better beer foam

    There was a time, some of you will still remember, when you could count the number of well-known national breweries in the United States on the fingers of your mug-holding hand. I won’t do a commercial here and ...
    Michael Bernstein
    last modified by Michael Bernstein
  • The Medical Bond: Nanoparticles could treat traumatic brain injuries

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when there’s a bump or blow to the head, or when something (like a bullet) goes into the head. Every year, about 1.7 million people, including soldiers, auto accident victims...
    Katie Cottingham
    last modified by Katie Cottingham
  • Flowers & Power: Putting the brakes on container ship pollution

    Many Americans can still remember the high prices, long lines and rationing of the 1973 oil crisis. OPEC’s embargo only lasted five months, but the 1974 National Maximum Speed Law intended to reduce fuel consump...
    Sam Lemonick
    last modified by Sam Lemonick