Two U.S.-based students have received the 2016 Kenneth G. Hancock Memorial Award, presented by the American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute (ACS GCI). Each recipient receives $1,000 USD. The award was formally presented at the 20th annual Green Chemistry & Engineering Conference held in Portland, Oregon, July 14-16, 2016.

 

This year’s recipients are Jesse Vanderveen and Austin Evans.

 

Austin Evan's research, titled “A Sulfur-Limonene Polysulfide Synthesized Entirely from Industrial Byproducts and Its Use in Removing Toxic Metals from Water and Soil”, is to devise sustainable methods to synthesize and supply polymers.Evens is a recent graduate from the University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.

 

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Jesse Vanderveen’s research, titled “Switchable Hydrophilicity Solvents: Benign alternatives to volatile organic solvents for syntheses, extractions, and separations”, is to identify SHS with desirable properties related to performance as well health, safety, and environmental impact. Vanderveen is a rising senior at Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

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Evens and Vanderveen both received the Hancock Award during the Welcome Reception at the 20th Annual GC&E Conference.

 

If you are interested in applying for the Hancock Memorial Fellowship or another green chemistry award, please take a look at the ACS GCI awards page for application deadlines and details.

 

 

 

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