news102816.jpgBio-based Cosmetic Start-up Amalie Beauty Inc Uses Natural Ingredients Grown in MIT Grad's Backyard Garden

October 27, 2016 | Indystar

 

MIT 2014 alumna Megan Cox created a line of “Farm to Face” products as a naturally-derived alternative to conventional cosmetics. Using ingredients grown in Cox’s grandparents’ Indiana backyard, Amalie Beauty Inc. plans to begin selling a line of face oils on November 1st, alongside the already successful Wink eyelash treatment which increases the body’s natural production of prostaglandins.

 

U.S. vs. EU: Chemicals Substitution Faceoff

October 27, 2016 | Green Biz

 

The European Union is far ahead of the United States in terms of legislative mandates that restrict the use or require substitution of highly hazardous chemicals. How well are EU governments and companies doing to develop safer substitutes, and how does their investment of resources and capacity building compare to the U.S.?

 

Alliance Launched to Support the Growth of the UK Bioeconomy

October 24, 2016 | Biomass Magazine

 

On Oct. 19, five established R&D centers across the U.K. announced a new alliance, BioPilotsUK. This alliance will seek to position Britain as a global leader in biorefining technology development and biobased product manufacture—two key elements of the bioeconomy.

 

Commercial CO2 Re-use Moves a Step Closer as Innovation Program Seeks Industrial Partners

October 24, 2016 | Business Green

 

The EnCO2re open innovation programme, formally launched at the K-Fair in Düsseldorf on Friday, is being led by cleantech incubator Climate-KIC and high tech polymer specialists Covestro. It aims use captured CO2 to replace fossil fuels as a feedstock in the manufacture of plastics.  The programme already has more than a dozen research partners in seven countries, however EnCO2re said is now ready to work with industrial partners deploy its CO2 re-use solutions at scale.  EnCO2re argues the CO2 re-use market has the potential to grow to up to 3.7 billion tonnes per year, 20 times its size today and equal to roughly 10 per cent of global emissions.