It’s not uncommon for an oral presenter to feel anxious: “What if Senior Professor Dr. X asks a probing question I cannot answer?  What if there is complete equipment failure despite my efforts to mitigate them?”  Often, these nervous feelings are unwarranted and the presentation proceeds as planned.


I presented my oral talk today.  The title “Solution Structures and Models Describing the Thioreoxin System from Mycobacterium tuberculosis,” described my work at Marquette University.  Our lab is using NMR methods to calculate the solution structures of the thioredoxins—small proteins that control the protein thiol redox state in a cell—from M. tb.  Since M. tb. resists oxidative killing in part by this system, we are working to design new inhibitors that target this system with the goal of indentifying new therapeutics.


The presentation went as expected and seemed well-received.  Two follow-up questions were asked and I was able to answer them with confidence.  Overall, it was a great experience to present to an international audie