Matthew Ranaghan - A second-site suppressor of a folding defect functions via interactions with a chaperone network to improve folding and assembly in vivo.

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      Publication Details (including relevant citation   information):

      A second-site suppressor of a folding defect functions via   interactions with a chaperone network to improve folding and   assembly in vivo.  Parent, K. N., Ranaghan, M. J., Teschke, C. M.   (2004) Mol.   Microbiol. 54 (4): 1036-50. (DOI:   10.1111/j.1365-2958.2004.04326.x)

     

      Abstract:

    Single amino acid substitutions in a protein can cause misfolding and aggregation to occur. Protein misfolding can be rescued by second-site amino acid substitutions called suppressor substitutions (su), commonly through stabilizing the native state of the protein or by increasing the rate of folding. Here we report evidence that su substitutions that rescue bacteriophage P22 temperature-sensitive-folding (tsf) coat protein variants function in a novel way. The ability of tsf:su coat proteins to fold and assemble under a variety of cellular conditions was determined by monitoring levels of phage production. The tsf:su coat proteins were found to more effectively utilize P22 scaffolding protein, an assembly chaperone, as compared with their tsf parents. Phage-infected cells were radioactively labelled to quantify the associations between coat protein variants and folding and assembly chaperones. Phage carrying the tsf:su coat proteins induced more GroEL and GroES, and increased formation of protein:chaperone complexes as compared with their tsf parents. We propose that the su substitutions result in coat proteins that are more assembly competent in vivo because of a chaperone-driven kinetic partitioning between aggregation-prone intermediates and the final assembled state. Through more proficient use of this chaperone network, the su substitutions exhibit a novel means of suppression of a folding defect.

      Address (URL): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15522085