Bren Mark Felisilda - Investigation of a solvent-cast organogel to form a liquid-gel microinterface array for electrochemical detection of lysozyme

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  Publication Details (including relevant citation   information):

Investigation of a solvent-cast organogel to form a liquid-gel microinterface array for electrochemical detection of lysozyme

  FelisildaBren Mark B   ; Alvarez De Eulate, Eva ; Arrigan, Damien W M

    Analytica chimica acta, 17 September 2015, Vol.893,   pp.34-40 [Peer   Reviewed Journal]

  Abstract:

    Ion transfer at aqueous-organogel interfaces enables the   non-redox detection of ions and ionisable species by voltammetry.   In this study, a non-thermal method for preparation of an   organogel was employed and used for the detection of   hen-egg-white-lysozyme (HEWL) via adsorptive stripping   voltammetry at an array of aqueous-organogel microinterfaces.   Tetrahydrofuran solvent casting was employed to prepare the   organogel mixture, hence removing the need for heating of the   solution to be gelled, as used in previous studies. Cyclic   voltammetry of HEWL at the microinterface array revealed a broad   adsorption process on the forward scan, at positive applied   potentials, followed by a desorption peak at ca. 0.68 V,   indicating the detection of HEWL in this region. Application of   an adsorption step, where a constant optimized potential of   0.95 V was applied, followed by voltammetric detection   provided for a linear response range of 0.02-0.84 μM and a   detection limit of 0.030 μM for 300 s adsorption. The   detection limit was further improved by utilizing differential   pulse stripping voltammetry, resulting in detection limits of   0.017 μM, 0.014 μM, and 0.010 μM for adsorptive   pre-concentration times of 60, 120 and 300 s, respectively,   in unstirred solutions. These results are an improvement over   other methods for the detection of HEWL at aqueous-organic   interfaces and offers a basis for the label-free detection of   protein. 

  Address (URL): http://www.sciencedirect.com.dbgw.lis.curtin.edu.au/science/article/pii/S0003267 015010028

 

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