Steven Stellman - Adipose concentrations of organochlorine compounds and breast cancer recurrence in Long Island, New York

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      Publication Details (including relevant citation   information):

      Muscat, J. E., Britton, J. A., Djordjevic, M. V., Citron, M. L.,   Kemeny, M., Busch-Devereaux, E., Pittman, B., Stellman, S. D.   12 (12) 1474-8-

      Abstract: Several studies have measured the   association between blood or adipose concentrations of   organochlorinated compounds (OCs), such as pesticides and   polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and breast cancer. The   estrogenic effects of OCs might adversely affect breast cancer   recurrence. The participants were 224 women with nonmetastatic   breast cancer enrolled in a New York-based case-control study.   Supercritical fluid extraction followed by gas chromatography was   conducted on adipose surgical specimens to determine OC   concentrations. The mean follow-up time from surgery was 3.6   years. Thirty women (13.4%) were diagnosed with a recurrence. The   concentration of pesticides and PCBs was correlated with baseline   age and body mass index, but not with cancer stage. The highest   tertile of total PCB concentration was associated with an   increased risk of recurrence [relative risk (RR), 2.9; 95%   confidence interval (CI), 1.02-8.2 versus the lowest tertile].   The risk for the highest tertile of the PCB congener Ballschmiter   and Zell 118 was 4.0 (95% CI, 1.3-4.9). There was an increased   risk for the middle level of the most abundant pesticide,   1,1-dichloro-2,2-di(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (RR, 2.3; 95% CI,   0.9-5.7), and for beta-hexachlorocyclohexane, but not for their   highest levels. Self-reported home termiticide exposure, alcohol   consumption (> or = 1 drink/day), and race were not associated   with prognosis. The RR for current cigarette smoking at diagnosis   was 2.1 (95% CI, 0.9-5.1). In contrast to previous data showing   no relationship between OC exposure and risk of breast cancer in   these women, adipose PCB concentrations were associated with   tumor recurrence. Pesticide levels were not related to   recurrence.

      Address (URL): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14693740