Oct
10

Basolo Award: Prof. Makoto Fujita (U. Tokyo), "Metal-directed Self-assembly for Constructing Nanoscale Discrete Structures and Developing Functions in their Cavities"

Created by Josh Kurutz on Oct 7, 2014

Friday, October 10, 2014 at Northwestern University, Technological Institute

Starts at 4:00 PM · Ends on Oct 10, 2014 at 9:00 PM, EDT (America/New_York)

  • Josh Kurutz

To honor the legacy of famed Northwestern Professor Fred Basolo, who was Chair of the NU Chemistry Department and also President of the American Chemical Society and strong supporter of the Chicago Section, Northwestern and the Chicago ACS gather together for this annual joint lecture and reception. This year, the Basolo Medal will be awarded to:

Professor Makoto Fujita

School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Japan

This year's event is part of Northwestern's Chemistry Department Reunion, which brings together student, postdoc, faculty, and staff alumni together with today's Northwestern Chemistry community.

PROGRAM FOR FRIDAY OCTOBER 10:

  • 4:00 - 6:30 Chicago ACS Registration
  • 3:00 - 5:00 Poster presentation (NU Labs and Centers)
  • 5:00 - 6:30 Basolo Lecture, preceded by Introductory Remarks
    • Peter Stair: Reunion welcome
    • Tom O’Halloran: Introduction of the event and History of the Basolo Medal
    • Josh Kurutz: Remarks from the Chicago Section ACS Chair
    • Chad Mirkin: Introduction of the Awardee and Presentation of the Medal
    • Makoto Fujita: Basolo Lecture
  • 6:30 - 8:30 Basolo Reception

DINNER

Buffet dinner which includes beef, chicken, eggplant lasagna and fettuccine.

Reservations for dinner are required by NOON TUESDAY OCTOBER 7. Please register using the "Register Now" buttons on this page. If you have questions or problems, please phone or email the Section office: 847-391-9091, chicagoacs@ameritech.net. PLEASE HONOR YOUR RESERVATIONS. The Section must pay for all dinner orders. No-shows will be billed.

Prof. Fujita's Biography:

Biography: Makoto Fujita is Professor of Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, the University of Tokyo, Japan.  He received his Ph.D. degree from the Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1987 under the guidance of Professor Tamejiro Hiyama.  After working in Chiba University (as assistant prof., lecture, and associate prof.) and the Institute for Molecular Science (IMS) at Okazaki (as associate prof.), in 1999, he was appointed as a full professor of Nagoya University.  In 2002, he moved to his current position.

            In view of constructing nanoscale discrete structures, Fujita has pioneered a novel principle of metal-directed self-assembly, in which transition-metal ions induce the spontaneous formation of targeted large frameworks.  His method features an extremely elegant use of square planar coordination geometry which was first demonstrated in 1990 by the self-assembly of a Pd(II)-bipyridine square complex.  Later on, a large variety of related molecules has been synthesized such as, in particular, cages, capsules, tubes, catenanes, and spheres.  Most of these structures have large hydrophobic cavities, within which Fujita elaborated and studied unique molecular recognition events that led to controlled chemical reactions and induced physical properties, at a very early stage of this research area.  These earlier studies have strongly contributed to triggering the rapid development of molecular self-assembly over the last twenty years.  Since 1994, Fujita has also actively contributed to the field of porous coordination networks. Dr. Fujita has about 280 publications between 1980 and 2013; more than 300 lectures and seminars at international or Japanese meetings, in universities or in industrial or governmental research centers.  According to ISI Web of Knowledge, Makoto Fujita is a "Most-Cited Scientists in Chemistry” (around 18,000 citations).  His h-index is equal to 71.

            Dr. Fujita’s awards and honors include:the ACS Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award, 2013; The Chemical Society of Japan (CSJ) Award, 2012; Kharasch Lectureship (University of Chicago), 2012; Abbott Lectureship (Illinois University), 2012; the 3rd Thomson Reuters Research Front Award, 2012; Leo Ezaki Prize, 2010; Japan Society of Coordination Chemistry Award, 2010; The Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Research Category, 2009; Honorary Professor of Renmin University of China (Department of Chemistry), 2007; G. W. Wheland Award, 2006; International Izatt-Christensen Award in Macrocyclic Chemistry, 2004: Silver Medal of Nagoya Medal Seminar, 2003; Earl L. Muetterties Memorial Lectures in Chemistry (UC Berkeley), 2003; Visiting Professor, Université Louis Pasteur, 2002 and 1999; Japan IBM Award, 2001; Gold Medal of Tokyo Techno Forum 21, 2001; The Divisional Award of the Chemical Society of Japan, 2000; Progress Award in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Japan; 1994.

Northwestern University, Technological Institute

2145 Sheridan Rd Evanston, IL United States