John Garner

PLLA from PolySciTech used in developing bioscaffold with dedicated perfusion channel for improved cell-growth

Blog Post created by John Garner on Feb 15, 2018

Tan, 2018 PLLA bioscaffold.jpg

Tissue engineering is a new field which holds promise to replace damaged or missing bone, muscle, skin, and even nerve tissue in injured patients. This technology relies on use of cell-scaffolds to provide mechanical support to the growing cells, as well as maintain suitable oxygen perfusion, cell-compatibility, and blood flow. This technology holds amazing potential to prevent amputations or life-time paralysis in the wake of severe trauma. However, the exact structure and nature of the cell-scaffold has to be exactly designed in order for the new-growing tissue to succeed. Recently, researchers at Chonnam National University (Korea) used PLLA (PolyVivo AP007) from PolySciTech (www.polyscitech.com) to develop a novel bone-tissue scaffold with a dedicated perfusion channel to ensure flow of oxygenated blood to the growing cells. This research holds promise to provide for repairing or replacing severely damaged bone tissue without requiring an autograft. Read more: Tan, Shiyi, Jiafei Gu, Seung Chul Han, Dong-Weon Lee, and Kiju Kang. "Design and fabrication of a non-clogging scaffold composed of semi-permeable membrane." Materials & Design 142 (2018): 229-239. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264127518300418

“Highlights: A 3D polymer membrane architecture was proposed as a novel concept of bio scaffold. It had two sub-volumes that were intertwined but separated by a semi-permeable membrane. One sub-volume was used for cell culture, while the other served as a perfusion channel. Mass transfer was implemented through the interfacial semi-permeable membrane. Despite very high porosity, its strength & modulus was appropriate for bones or cartilages. Abstract: In this study, a novel concept of polymer scaffold was proposed based on 3D porous membrane architecture. It had two distinct sub-volumes intertwined with each other but separated by a single continuous smooth semi-permeable membrane. One sub-volume was used for cell culture, while the other served as a perfusion channel. Mass transfer was implemented through the interfacial porous membrane. Consequently, this scaffold was expected to be completely free from clogging problem due to growing tissue. The sample scaffolds of poly l-lactic acid (PLLA) was fabricated based on 3D UV photo-lithography and porogen leaching technique, which provided a P-surface-like architecture composed of porous membrane having smooth and fine texture with considerably high porosity. Despite high overall porosity of approximately 97%, these scaffolds had strengths and Young's moduli appropriate for regeneration of bones or cartilages. Wettability and permeability of polydopamine-coated PLLA porous membrane were sufficiently high. Keywords: 3D membrane architecture; Minimal surface; Scaffold; 3D lithography”

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