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ChemistryQuest
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Chemical Holograms?

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Hello, I’m writing a sci-fi story and had questions regarding my concept for how holograms could work in it. 

The idea is that an invisible, photo-reactive gas is released from an emitter, then computer-controlled lasers are fired to different points within the cloud to “draw” a 3D image out of glowing particles, sort of like how SLA resin printers work, only the particles would glow instead of solidifying from the lasers. Is this a viable concept? 

Secondarily, if this is feasible, how would various environmental factors like temperature and humidity affect these chemical holograms? Would they be able to be used outdoors? I had an idea for something called “H-smog,” which would be like a glowing smog created under certain conditions when the activated hologram particles sink to lower altitudes and collect in alleys and stuff. 

Thanks so much for your time! 

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William3391
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Re: Chemical Holograms?

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@ChemistryQuest wrote:

Hello, I’m writing a sci-fi story and had questions regarding my concept for how holograms could work in it. 

The idea is that an invisible, photo-reactive gas is released from an emitter, then computer-controlled lasers are fired to different points within the cloud to “draw” a 3D image out of glowing particles, sort of like how SLA resin printers work Subway Listens , only the particles would glow instead of solidifying from the lasers. Is this a viable concept? 

Secondarily, if this is feasible, how would various environmental factors like temperature and humidity affect these chemical holograms? Would they be able to be used outdoors? I had an idea for something called “H-smog,” which would be like a glowing smog created under certain conditions when the activated hologram particles sink to lower altitudes and collect in alleys and stuff. 

Thanks so much for your time! 


Your concept of using an invisible, photo-reactive gas to create a 3D image using computer-controlled lasers is an interesting one. While I am not an expert in this field, I can tell you that there are some similarities between your idea and the way holograms work in real life.

Holography is a technique that enables a wavefront to be recorded and later reconstructed. It is best known as a method of generating real three-dimensional images but also has a wide range of other applications. In principle, it is possible to make a hologram for any type of wave. A hologram is a recording that captures and stores an interference pattern. It can be created by capturing light from a real scene or generated by a computer, in which case it is known as a computer-generated hologram.

Regarding your question about the feasibility of your concept, I would say that it is possible to create a 3D image using the method you described. However, the exact details of how it would work would depend on the specific properties of the gas and the lasers used. Additionally, the environmental factors you mentioned, such as temperature and humidity, could potentially affect the performance of the hologram. For example, if the gas is sensitive to temperature changes, then it may be more difficult to use the hologram outdoors in certain weather conditions.

As for your idea of “H-smog,” it is an interesting concept. However, I would caution that creating a glowing smog could have negative environmental impacts. It is important to consider the potential consequences of such a technology before implementing it.

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William3391
New Contributor

Re: Chemical Holograms?

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@ChemistryQuest wrote:

Hello, I’m writing a sci-fi story and had questions regarding my concept for how holograms could work in it. 

The idea is that an invisible, photo-reactive gas is released from an emitter, then computer-controlled lasers are fired to different points within the cloud to “draw” a 3D image out of glowing particles, sort of like how SLA resin printers work Subway Listens , only the particles would glow instead of solidifying from the lasers. Is this a viable concept? 

Secondarily, if this is feasible, how would various environmental factors like temperature and humidity affect these chemical holograms? Would they be able to be used outdoors? I had an idea for something called “H-smog,” which would be like a glowing smog created under certain conditions when the activated hologram particles sink to lower altitudes and collect in alleys and stuff. 

Thanks so much for your time! 


Your concept of using an invisible, photo-reactive gas to create a 3D image using computer-controlled lasers is an interesting one. While I am not an expert in this field, I can tell you that there are some similarities between your idea and the way holograms work in real life.

Holography is a technique that enables a wavefront to be recorded and later reconstructed. It is best known as a method of generating real three-dimensional images but also has a wide range of other applications. In principle, it is possible to make a hologram for any type of wave. A hologram is a recording that captures and stores an interference pattern. It can be created by capturing light from a real scene or generated by a computer, in which case it is known as a computer-generated hologram.

Regarding your question about the feasibility of your concept, I would say that it is possible to create a 3D image using the method you described. However, the exact details of how it would work would depend on the specific properties of the gas and the lasers used. Additionally, the environmental factors you mentioned, such as temperature and humidity, could potentially affect the performance of the hologram. For example, if the gas is sensitive to temperature changes, then it may be more difficult to use the hologram outdoors in certain weather conditions.

As for your idea of “H-smog,” it is an interesting concept. However, I would caution that creating a glowing smog could have negative environmental impacts. It is important to consider the potential consequences of such a technology before implementing it.

ChemistryQuest
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Re: Chemical Holograms?

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Thank you for such an in-depth and detailed response! As this is a fictional work, as long as it’s scientifically “plausible” that such a thing could exist with technological development invested into creating it, then I am satisfied to use it as an element of a hypothetical future. As far as the environmental impact is concerned, it is something I was planning to have be addressed - the work is meant to be a dystopian world where the destruction of the environment for commercial purposes is one of the main issues the heroes must fight against. H-Smog produced by holographic advertisements leaching toxic chemicals into the air and water is just one example of that. 
thank you again for such a detailed response, I appreciate you taking the time to clarify these things! 

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michaljacks51
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Re: Chemical Holograms?

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Your concept sounds fascinating! Using a photo-reactive gas and lasers to create chemical holograms could definitely work in a sci-fi setting. However, environmental factors like temperature and humidity might impact their stability and runaway children visibility. Integrating "H-smog" adds an intriguing layer to your story, creating a unique atmospheric effect.

 
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markhelbert21
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Re: Chemical Holograms?

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Your concept of chemical holograms is fascinating! It aligns with advanced technology principles and could add a unique twist to your sci-fi story. Considering stackedjeans.store  environmental factors like temperature and humidity could definitely enrich the realism of your hologram system.

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