Upcoming Webinars

Characterizing quality attributes and other characteristics of biologics, vaccines, and gene vectors is essential at each stage of its discovery, development, production, and quality control. Analytical techniques based on light scattering have become powerful tools for characterizing various attributes include molar mass, size, aggregation, physical titer, thermal and colloidal stability.    In this webinar, we highlight robust, reliable, simple, quantitative, and fast ways to use three different light scattering techniques - batch dynamic light scattering (DLS), static light scattering (SLS), and massively parallel phase analysis light scattering (MP-PALS) - to characterize the stability of vaccines and gene therapeutic nanoparticles.    Key Learning Objectives: Basic DLS and MP-PALS theory and instrumentation  How DLS and SLS are applied to study the stability of AAVs and vaccines  How DLS and MP-PALS characterize the stability of lipid nanoparticles  How high-throughput formulation and stability studies are carried out with these techniques  Who Should Attend: Pharmaceutical scientists involved in analytical characterization and formulation of proteins, monoclonal antibodies, and gene therapeutic nanoparticles Scientists and managers in need of robust, reliable, simple, and fast methods for evaluating biophysical properties and stability Managers of academic labs and core facilities developing viral vectors and LNPs   Brought to you by:   Xujun Zhang, Ph.D. Application Scientist, Wyatt Technology Ann Thayer Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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In the development of biotherapeutics, a thorough understanding of a molecule’s product quality attributes (PQAs), and their effect on various structure-function relationships and long-term stability, is essential for ensuring the safety and efficacy of the product. At present, numerous routine chromatographic and electrophoretic assays are used to characterize and monitor individual PQAs. However, execution of multiple routine methods for batch release, stability time-points, and process/formulation development support becomes time and resource intensive, and often provides an indirect measure of biologically relevant PQAs. Introduced in 2015, the multi-attribute method (MAM), based on LC-MS peptide mapping and automation principles, provides simultaneous and site-specific detection, identification, quantitation, and quality control (monitoring) of PQAs.   A dedicated Pfizer team has been regularly employing MAM on an in-house MAM platform to support biotherapeutic process and product development. In parallel, this team has continually explored and implemented improvements in the Pfizer MAM platform, including sample preparation and data processing automation, to move toward the next generation of MAM. Recently, a pre-commercial demo model of the new Orbitrap Exploris MX mass detector was evaluated in-house by the Pfizer MAM team. Here, the results of the evaluation and an assessment of the Orbitrap Exploris MX mass detector’s suitability as a next generation MAM instrument are presented.   Key Learning Objectives: Pfizer MAM platform milestones for characterization and routine monitoring Automation of sample handling and data processing and reporting Evaluation and optimization of the Orbitrap Exploris MX mass detector for MAM Who Should Attend: Laboratory managers Chromatographers New product developers Brought to you by:   Andrew W. Dawdy, Ph.D. Principal Scientist, BioTherapeutics Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pfizer, Inc. Ann Thayer Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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Accurately identifying unknowns by searching a library of GC/MS spectral data is straightforward but often yields ambiguous results. Isomeric compounds that have the same molecular formula, but different structures, can give very similar spectral signatures. In addition, peaks with co-eluting compounds can lead to inconclusive or incorrect results.    Cerno’s GC/ID data processing software utilizes an advanced mixture deconvolution algorithm and then combines information from spectral libraries, retention index (RI) data, and accurate mass formula confirmation to identify unknowns on single quadrupole mass spectrometer systems. The software automatically generates RIs for detected compounds during a single or batch run, without running separate standards. Finally, it visually highlights correct identifications among a long list of possible matches. This post acquisition software works with most commercially available GC/MS systems.    Key Learning Objectives: Learn how to obtain retention index automatically from your unknown sample itself Learn how to obtain accurate mass and spectral accuracy on your single quadrupole GC/MS system Learn how to combine multiple ID metrics and quickly come to a conclusive answer Learn how to make your GC/MS analysis dramatically more productive  Who Should Attend: Analysts and lab managers utilizing GC/MS for qualitative or semi-quantitative analysis. Brought to you by: Don Kuehl, PhD VP of Product Development and Marketing, Cerno Bioscience Ann Thayer Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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Building a more sustainable future requires research innovations, but equally important is translating that research into technical solutions for industrial manufacturers where it can have a practical impact. “Frontier Fridays” returns to explore the science that will revolutionize the future of the human race.   Mark Mascal at the University of California Davis (a 2022 EPA Green Chemistry Challenge Award winner) will describe his work with Origin Materials, Inc. in developing and implementing a novel technology to replace chemicals commonly made from petroleum with products derived from forestry, agricultural and municipal wastes. This technology could change the environmental impact of the plastics industry, among others, by supplying chemical feedstocks that are both net zero-carbon and recyclable.   Modern chemical manufacturing depends upon purification via chemical separations and most industrial separations are achieved with energy-intensive, thermally driven processes (e.g., distillation) that account for 10-15% of global energy usage. Dr. Ryan P. Lively at Georgia Tech will describe how his research team and collaborators developed the first polymeric membranes for crude oil fractionation, an extremely complex hydrocarbon separation process that is vital to the production of modern fuels and chemicals. This new approach could drastically reduce the energy needed for industrial separations.   This ACS Webinar is moderated by Adelina Voutchkova, Director for Sustainable Development at ACS, and is co-produced with the ACS Committee on Science and the ACS Office of Sustainable Development as part of the 2022 Frontier Fridays series.
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In forensic chemistry, the presence of drugs and novel psychoactive substances at low concentrations or in complicated mixtures present challenges to traditional analytical screening methods. At the same time, ensuring timely investigative information, determining appropriate analytical schemes and improving the safety of laboratory personnel, healthcare practitioners and crime scene investigators is crucial.     In this webinar, Colby Ott, PhD, Research Scientist at West Virginia University and Luis E. Arroyo-Mora, PhD, Professor at the Department of Forensic and Investigative Sciences at West Virginia University, will present the fundamentals behind electrochemical-surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (EC-SERS) and how the advantages of this technique can be leveraged for on-site screening of drugs of abuse. Our experts will describe how the SPELEC combination potentiostat-Raman spectrometer serves to provide simple, time-resolved data and how EC-SERS can be applied to other applications. Tune in to learn about two EC-SERS methods and their analytical performance as well as an assessment of authentic casework samples which will demonstrate the strength of this approach.    Key Learning Objectives: Develop a basic understanding of time-resolved electrochemical surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (EC-SERS)  Learn how EC-SERS provides a novel and effective screening platform for drugs of abuse  Discover the advantages of hyphenated EC-SERS instrumentation  Who Should Attend: Anyone interested in learning how spectroelectrochemical and time-resolved techniques can be leveraged to provide reliable and effective analytical platforms  Anyone working in the field of forensic science  Anyone interested in understanding how electrochemistry and Raman spectroscopy can work together to improve detection    Brought to you by:   Speakers: Colby Ott, Ph.D. Research Scientist West Virginia University Luis E. Arroyo-Mora, Ph.D. Associate Professor West Virginia University   Melissa O'Meara Forensic Science Consultant C&EN Media Group
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The identification of new chemical matter represents a critical step in the early stages of a drug discovery project. An increasingly broad collection of platforms are available to perform this task, some more suited to small, focused screening sets and some more adapted to very large screening sets. Recently traditional high-throughput biochemical assays with a functional read-out have been supplemented by a range of assays based on biophysical methods that address the physical interaction between ligand and protein, but are agnostic of the functional consequence (if any).    In this webinar we will focus on those techniques that seek to identify small molecule binders to target proteins using such ‘affinity selection’ methods. We will discuss the current state of the art for screening of fragments, small screening collections, and ultra-large diversity collections using techniques such as NMR, affinity selection mass spectrometry, and DNA-encoded library screens.      Key Learning Objectives: Review techniques that seek to identify small molecule binders to target proteins using such ‘affinity selection’ methods   Explore the current state of the art for screening of fragments, small screening collections, and ultra-large diversity collections using techniques such as NMR, affinity selection mass spectrometry, and DNA-encoded library screens.  Who Should Attend: Drug discovery scientists in academia Drug discovery scientists in biotech and pharmaceutical industry  Chemists  Biologists  Pharmacologists   Bioanalytical Scientists Biophysical Scientists Brought to you by:   Speakers: Dave Madge Vice President WuXi AppTec Alex Satz Senior Director, DEL Strategy WuXi AppTec Grzegorz Popowicz Head, Helmholtz Institute   Penny Jia AS-MS Project Leader WuXi AppTec Ann Thayer Contributing Editor C&EN Media Group
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The relative abundance of empty and full AAV capsids in gene therapy vector preparations is a critical quality attribute. A variety of methods are available to perform these measurements including SEC-MALS, which combines separation by size-exclusion chromatography with detection by multi-angle light scattering, UV/Vis, and differential refractometry. However, there are relatively few reports that compare these methods. This webinar compares the outcomes of numerous orthogonal characterization methods on a single vector preparation. We find that SEC-MALS not only provides favorable performance for quality control and product development applications, but that it is uniquely situated to be established as a platform method for the semi-quantitative measurement of empty/full ratios across AAV serotypes, transgenes, and manufacturing processes.   Key Learning Objectives: How SEC-MALS quantifies empty and full AAVs, as well as other attributes Are empty/full readouts from different assays comparable? Other light scattering techniques that quantify AAVs Who Should Attend: CMC teams supporting AAV-based therapies Scientists involved in AAV characterization, analytical method development, process development, and quality control Lab managers that need to select and support an optimal set of AAV characterization methods   Brought to you by: Speakers: Margaret Butko Associate Director, Protein Analytical Characterization at Adverum Prithwijit Sarkar Regional Manager, Northern California, Wyatt Technology Corporation Kelly McSweeney Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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The development of rechargeable Li-ion batteries (LIBs) has revolutionized electric vehicles and portable electronic devices. Further advancements are needed to improve the power density, safety, reliability, and lifetime of LIBs. ​​Over the past few decades, atomistic modeling of battery materials has complemented experimental characterization techniques and has become an integral part of the development of new technologies. Reliable atomic scale modeling enables rapid initial evaluation of large chemical and material design space accelerating the development cycle of next-generation battery technologies.    In this webinar, we will demonstrate how Schrödinger’s advanced digital chemistry platform can be leveraged to accelerate the design and discovery of next-generation battery materials with improved properties. We will discuss the application of both physics-based and machine learning techniques for understanding structure-property relationships of different components of batteries including electrodes, electrolytes and electrode-electrolyte interfaces. We also discuss the automated active learning framework for the development of state-of-the-art neural network force fields for modeling liquid electrolytes. The framework allows training the force field using highly accurate range-separated hybrid density functional theory data which enables accurate prediction of critical bulk properties of high-performance liquid electrolytes for application in advanced batteries.    Key Learning Objectives: Understand predictive capabilities of physics-based modeling for battery materials  Learn how automated high throughput simulation workflows enable rapid screening of new battery material candidates  Application of advanced neural network force fields for accurate electrolyte property prediction  Who Should Attend: Synthetic Chemists  Materials Scientists  Digitization Managers  R&D Scientists designing novel battery materials Brought to you by: Speakers: Garvit Agarwal Senior Scientist, Schrödinger Kelly McSweeney Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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