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Upcoming Webinars

Technology born as a powerful drawing tool is now transforming and empowering a Chemist’s journey.    ChemDraw is the technology that parallels and powers the evolution of this journey. Designed with chemistry in mind, ChemDraw and ChemOffice+ Cloud accelerates countless administrative tasks that impede a Chemist’s ability to spend time on what matters most: Chemistry.    Join Pierre Morieux, a.k.a ChemDraw Wizard, to learn about the newest capabilities that will empower you to create beautiful chemical drawings more efficiently, communicate your research visually, and expedite mundane tasks such as managing molecules and reactions as well as everyday reporting.    Chemists can work more efficiently, communicate their research more clearly, and reach crucial information faster with ChemDraw.    Learn how powerful capabilities in the latest release of ChemDraw and ChemOffice+ Cloud v21 will dramatically increase your productivity and accelerate your chemistry research and discovery by enabling you to:    Improve the efficiency of your research by drawing entire complex reactions schemes in minutes with new hotkeys and improved shortcuts.  Effortlessly and expediently represent 3D organic and organometallic, inorganic, and supramolecular structures.  Make your ChemDraw files come to life with the ability to embed native, animated 3D models in MS PowerPoint directly.  Create chemistry lab reports in a few clicks with the new reporting capability of ChemOffice+, integrated with Signals Notebook.  Who Should Attend: Chemists  Research Chemists  Organic Chemists  Inorganic Chemists  Organometallic Chemists  Polymer Chemists  Ph.D. Students and Post-Docs  Patent Attorneys   Brought to you by: SPEAKERS Pierre Morieux, Ph.D. ChemDraw Global Marketing Manager, ChemDraw Wizard Melissa O'M eara Forensic Science Consultant, C&EN Media Group
PerkinElmer Webinar
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In this Webinar you will learn about the analytical techniques solving today’s challenges in battery component recycling. Learn about robust and practical atomic spectroscopy solutions which detect and mitigate against cross-contamination during the recycling process. See examples of TGA and STA in understanding the degradation and thermal properties of battery materials. Learn how this knowledge allows recyclers to understand the behavior of certain materials during processing. Drive the development of more circular input structures by finding the best laboratory analysis solutions for material reclaim and reuse.   Key Learning Objectives: Understand trends and challenges facing battery recyclers Get an overview of recycling processes and approaches Recognize and prevent cross-contamination of materials during the recycling process Compare ICP-OES vs ICP-MS technologies for materials reclaim Gain insights into pyrometallurgical recycling with TGA and STA analysis   Who Should Attend: Battery and energy storage researchers Laboratory managers Materials scientists Academic researchers in the field Principal investigators on energy-related projects Scientists at battery manufacturers or recycling specialists Brought to you by: Sascha Nowak Head of Analytics & Environment, MEET Battery Research Center Ryan Purcell-Joiner Senior Application Scientist, PerkinElmer Inc. Gerlinde Wita Global Market Leader, PerkinElmer Inc. Kieran Evans Application Scientist, PerkinElmer Inc. Jeff Huber Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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Native mass spectrometry (nMS), in which intact protein or nucleoprotein complexes are directly measured, commonly involves exchange of nonvolatile electrolytes (NaCl, PBS, Tris) for volatile electrolytes such as ammonium acetate. This can be time-consuming if offline buffer exchange spin cartridges are used.  Furthermore, some samples may not be stable if left in nonvolatile buffer for more than just a very short period of time. This problem can be avoided if an LC-compatible online buffer exchange column is used to separate protein complex from salt.  In this experiment, no attempt is made to perform size exclusion chromatography to separate protein complexes of different sizes but rather any protein complex that is injected onto the system is simply separated from low mass salts that would otherwise product heavily adducted protein complexes that appear as broad peaks in the mass spectrum.  This webinar will focus on the development of online buffer exchange (OBE) for nMS applications and will describe how the experiment is implemented and how it can be extended by coupling to affinity separation (e.g., IMAC-OBE) to be used to optimize protein overexpression.    Key Learning Objectives: The use of online buffer exchange for high throughput  native mass spectrometry   Online buffer exchange nMS allows to directly screen structural features of large biomolecules even if such biomolecules are not very stable in MS friendly buffers  How the coupling of affinity separation (e.g., IMAC-OBE) to online-buffer exchange can be used to optimize protein overexpression  Who Should Attend: MS practitioners  Researchers/ R&D Managers  Laboratory Managers/ Directors / Supervisors  Laboratory Technicians / Operators  Structural Biologists  Scientists in biopharma engaged in biotherapeutic characterization    Brought to you by:   Vicki Wysocki, Ph.D. Professor, Dept of Chemistry and Biochemistry The Ohio State University Catherine Dold Health & Environment Writer, C&EN Media Group
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Catalysts facilitate the creation of almost all synthetic materials we interact with everyday. New materials require new catalysts with enhanced and novel properties. Traditional synthetic approaches for materials discovery are expensive and slow. First-principles simulation has become a reliable tool for the prediction of structures, chemical mechanisms, and reaction energetics for the fundamental steps in homogeneous catalysis. Details of reaction coordinates for competing pathways can provide the fundamental understanding of observed catalytic activity, selectivity, and specificity. Such predictive capability raises the possibility for computational discovery and design of new catalysts with enhanced properties. Unfortunately, this is an arduous process that requires meticulous maintenance, specialized training, and accounting of hundreds of files and properties.   To facilitate the fundamental understanding, design, and discovery of novel catalysts, an automated enterprise solution was designed and developed for collaboration between synthetic and computational chemists on a single web-based platform.    Key Learning Objectives: Discover the predictive capabilities of physics-based modeling in reactivity and catalysis.  See how automated high-throughput screening accelerates synthetic discovery.  Learn how a web-based platform can generate more ideas and drive innovation through the collaboration of computational and synthetic chemists.  Who Should Attend: Synthetic Chemists  Materials Scientists  Chemical Engineers  Digitization Managers  R&D Scientists designing novel materials    Brought to you by:   Thomas Mustard Scientific Lead of Catalysis and Reactivity, Schrödinger Kelly McSweeney Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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The characterization of extractables and leachables (E&L) is an integral part of ensuring biocompatibility for many medical devices and pharmaceutical products. Guidance for E&L has been provided in USP <1663> and <1664> for pharmaceutical products and in ISO 10993-18 for medical devices. The first step in the E&L process involves detection of those compounds which are suspected to be at or above the level of toxicological concern. This process is accomplished through the use of the Analytical Evaluation Threshold (AET) which links the toxicologically relevant concentration to the observed analytical signals. A significant problem in AET evaluation is caused by response factor (RF) variation. It is an unfortunate reality that compounds which are at equivalent concentration do not always or even often give equivalent signal response on various detector systems including mass spectrometers. Recent publications have highlighted these risks for both LCMS (Jordi, et al. J. Pharm. Biomed. **bleep**. 2018, 150, 368–376) and GCMS (Jenke and Odufu, Journal of Chromatographic Science 2012;50:206–212). The prominent and necessary use of surrogate standards for AET evaluation introduces error into the precise estimation of the signal strength which corresponds to the toxicologically relevant concentration. To overcome this problem, an uncertainty factor has been introduced into the AET equation and regulatory agencies have provided recommendations as to values for the UF (GC/MS with UF =4, LC/MS with UF =10). While this approach does account for response variation, it also introduces other difficulties including lower AET values which can be difficult or impractical to achieve which then require additional sample concentration due to limited instrument sensitivity. This has the potential to counteract the perceived benefit resulting in compound loss or degradation and additional regulatory scrutiny of the sample preparation process. This approach also results in a significant potential for false positives (I.e., compounds that are below the AET concentration are determined to have a peak area above the threshold associated with the AET). An alternative approach is therefore desirable. In this webinar, a new case study will be presented using the multidetector approach to AET evaluation contrasted with the use of the recommended UF of 4 and 10 for a model polymer system. The multidetector approach leverages the independence of the response factors for a given compound obtained on different detectors and chromatographic systems to overcome potential weak signals on any one detector and thus reduces the reliance of the method on UF to overcome response variation. The multidetector approach was summarized in two recent publications (Jordi, et al. J. Pharm. Biomed. **bleep**. 2020, 186, 1-14 and Jordi, et al. PDA Journal, vol. 75, No. 2 2021, pg. 289-301). The effectiveness of using a combination of triple detection Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LCMS) with Ultraviolet (UV) and Charged aerosol detection (CAD) as well as Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS) will be presented. Quantitation for a series of reference compounds characteristic of the polymer systems will be used to gauge the potential for false positives using the different AET approaches. Finally, the benefits of this approach for detection of compounds with little to no mass spectrometry response will be highlighted.   Key Learning Objectives: Objective 1: What is the Analytical Evaluation Threshold and how should it be applied?   Objective 2: Review a Case study comparing the use of regulatory agency recommended approaches to AET evaluation and a multidetector approach.   Objective 3: How can using a multidetector approach reduce the need for large UF and by extension the need for additional sample preparation steps?  Who Should Attend: Laboratory managers  Chromatographers  New product developers    Brought to you by:   Dr. Mark Jordi President, Jordi Labs Jeff Huber Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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Continuous manufacturing (flow chemistry) is a key element in the green-chemistry landscape of a pharmaceutical company. In this webinar, Benjamin Martin, PhD from Novartis will use case studies to illustrate the drivers for continuous processing for clinical supplies, the challenges navigated during process R & D, and a summary of how the sustainability metrics, Process-Mass-Intensity (PMI) and Total CO2-Release (TCR), are positively affected.     Hongwei Yang, PhD from WuXi STA will show how industry collaboration between Pharma companies and CDMOs with strong capability to quickly develop or transfer in a flow process and assemble customized lines at plant-scale can accelerate the implementation of continuous manufacturing for drug substance supply with a cost-effective and greener process.    Key Learning Objectives: Sustainability metrics for continuous manufacturing (CM) in pharmaceutical industry  Key drivers for using CM at the clinical stages  How Innovators and CDMOs can work together to speed implementation of CM and bring therapies to patients faster.  Who Should Attend: Pharmaceutical & Fine Chemists  Academic Chemistry Researchers  Process & Development Chemists  Drug Discovery Chemists    Brought to you by: Benjamin Martin, Ph.D. Associate Director Science & Technology Continuous Manufacturing-Upstream Network Leader, Novartis Hongwei Yang, Ph.D. Executive Director and Head of Flow Chemistry, WuXi STA, a subsidiary of WuXi AppTec Melissa O'Meara Forensic Science Consultant, C&EN Media Group
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There is a trend in the materials industry towards thinner and thinner coatings that create new applications and enable both material and cost savings. However, as coatings become thinner, the traditional methods for coating hardness testing become less accurate or fail entirely.     Although methods are available for measuring the hardness of thin films, up until now, they have tended to be both price-prohibitive and require extremely complex and difficult to use instrumentation.     With the introduction of the Hit 300, accurate hardness testing of thin films is now both accessible and affordable for any lab or production site developing new coating materials.     Anton Paar is proud to present “Accessible and Affordable Hardness Testing of Thin Coatings,” a live webinar discussing the benefits and limitations of traditional hardness testing as well as new developments that enable accurate and affordable hardness measurements of ultrathin coatings.     This webinar will include real-life applications of hardness testing methods, including:     • Hardness testing of cutting tool coatings     • Analysis of thin DLC films     • Alumina-based coatings     • Paints and other polymers    Key Learning Objectives: New developments that have made hardness testing of thin coatings easier to use and more cost-effective  Real-life applications of hardness testing methods that can be done more efficiently with the newest generation of instruments  Who Should Attend: Research Scientists  Laboratory Managers  University Researchers  Quality Engineers    Brought to you by:   Mark Haase Commercial Product Specialist, Anton Paar Kelly McSweeney Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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Multidimensional measurements integrating liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) provide valuable polarity, structural and mass information simultaneously for lipidomic analyses and show tremendous power for attaining more confident lipid identifications. For all of their advantages, LC-IMS-MS measurements are highly complex and result in huge datasets which are difficult to process in a timely fashion. Thus, developing a data analysis workflow that is capable of accurate and rapid molecular analyses is essential.   The freely available, open-source software Skyline offers targeted processing of lipid data which ultimately allows for confident identification of diverse lipid species. We have developed sample-specific lipid spectral libraries which include over 700 target lipids from multiple lipid categories. Each target lipid is populated with m/z values, normalized retention times, ion mobility collision cross section (CCS) values, and known fragmentation patterns. These values were manually extracted from LC-IMS-MS experimental data and verified using existing literature.   Recently developed aspects of the Skyline small molecule interface are utilized in this workflow including IMS spectrum filtering and retention time prediction (iRT) using a set of ~20 endogenous lipids for gradient correction and LC alignment. Application of lipid CCS value filtering further increased lipid annotation confidence and greatly improved the signal to noise ratio for the target species. These lipid spectral libraries have undergone additional validation studies and have recently been made publicly available through Skyline’s online repository Panorama.   In comparison to previous studies of NIST SRM 1950, this workflow when coupled with an LCIMS-CID-MS platform gave hundreds of confident annotations using a single sample extraction and analysis platform.   Key Learning Objectives: Learn to overcome challenges with large,  highly complex datasets generated from liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry lipidomic analyses. Developing sample-specific multidimensional lipid libraries using Skyline. Build a workflow leveraging Skyline automation features such as small-molecule spectral libraries, drift time filtering, iRT retention time prediction, analysis of multiple adducts, and neutral loss fragments. Who Should Attend: Lipidomics researchers Chromatographers/Mass spectrometrists Drug development scientists   Brought to you by:   Kaylie Kirkwood, Ph.D. North Carolina State university Kelly McSweeney Contributing Editor C&EN Media Group
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Characterizing quality attributes and other characteristics of biologics, vaccines, and gene vectors is essential at each stage of its discovery, development, production, and quality control. Analytical techniques based on light scattering have become powerful tools for characterizing various attributes include molar mass, size, aggregation, physical titer, thermal and colloidal stability.    In this webinar, we highlight robust, reliable, simple, quantitative, and fast ways to use three different light scattering techniques - batch dynamic light scattering (DLS), static light scattering (SLS), and massively parallel phase analysis light scattering (MP-PALS) - to characterize the stability of vaccines and gene therapeutic nanoparticles.    Key Learning Objectives: Basic DLS and MP-PALS theory and instrumentation  How DLS and SLS are applied to study the stability of AAVs and vaccines  How DLS and MP-PALS characterize the stability of lipid nanoparticles  How high-throughput formulation and stability studies are carried out with these techniques  Who Should Attend: Pharmaceutical scientists involved in analytical characterization and formulation of proteins, monoclonal antibodies, and gene therapeutic nanoparticles Scientists and managers in need of robust, reliable, simple, and fast methods for evaluating biophysical properties and stability Managers of academic labs and core facilities developing viral vectors and LNPs   Brought to you by:   Xujun Zhang, Ph.D. Application Scientist, Wyatt Technology Ann Thayer Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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In the development of biotherapeutics, a thorough understanding of a molecule’s product quality attributes (PQAs), and their effect on various structure-function relationships and long-term stability, is essential for ensuring the safety and efficacy of the product. At present, numerous routine chromatographic and electrophoretic assays are used to characterize and monitor individual PQAs. However, execution of multiple routine methods for batch release, stability time-points, and process/formulation development support becomes time and resource intensive, and often provides an indirect measure of biologically relevant PQAs. Introduced in 2015, the multi-attribute method (MAM), based on LC-MS peptide mapping and automation principles, provides simultaneous and site-specific detection, identification, quantitation, and quality control (monitoring) of PQAs.   A dedicated Pfizer team has been regularly employing MAM on an in-house MAM platform to support biotherapeutic process and product development. In parallel, this team has continually explored and implemented improvements in the Pfizer MAM platform, including sample preparation and data processing automation, to move toward the next generation of MAM. Recently, a pre-commercial demo model of the new Orbitrap Exploris MX mass detector was evaluated in-house by the Pfizer MAM team. Here, the results of the evaluation and an assessment of the Orbitrap Exploris MX mass detector’s suitability as a next generation MAM instrument are presented.   Key Learning Objectives: Pfizer MAM platform milestones for characterization and routine monitoring Automation of sample handling and data processing and reporting Evaluation and optimization of the Orbitrap Exploris MX mass detector for MAM Who Should Attend: Laboratory managers Chromatographers New product developers Brought to you by:   Andrew W. Dawdy, Ph.D. Principal Scientist, BioTherapeutics Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pfizer, Inc. Ann Thayer Contributing Editor, C&EN Media Group
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